GPG key 2048 vs. 4096

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by Stifflersmom, Aug 22, 2013.

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  1. Stifflersmom

    Stifflersmom Registered Member

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    I recently started using GPG keys with my email. I didn't notice it when I set up my key but the encryption is 2048 RSA. The highest is 4096.
    In order to change my key strength, I believe i have to create another key which involves revoking my current key (you can't just delete keys).

    Is it worth changing the strength of the key now before too many people save my key? Can someone confirm that there is no way to change it, that I have to revoke the certificate (since I uploaded the key to the public server) and then start a new key? Thanks.
     
  2. 0strodamus

    0strodamus Registered Member

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    I'm not a GPG expert, but I will confirm that you have to revoke the original public key and replace it with a new one. If there is a way to edit an existing public key, it will be news to me.
     
  3. JackmanG

    JackmanG Former Poster

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    Yes I would go ahead and do it.

    This article is pretty old, but it should offer some useful info.

    And see here for a list of PGP best practices.
     
  4. Stifflersmom

    Stifflersmom Registered Member

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    Thanks guys. Once again, I appreciate you taking the time to answer my questions and help me.
     
  5. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

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    You only need to revoke if you sent it to a public key server. You absolutely can just delete, and have your friends delete, the key, if you didn't put it on a key server.

    PD
     
  6. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    I can't think of any reason to use the smaller key. With today's computers you will notice no difference, but the security is hugely improved. Just simple math, which is irrefutable.
     
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