Got an APC Back-UPS XS!

Discussion in 'ten-forward' started by spy1, Mar 5, 2004.

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  1. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    Feeling a lot better about not getting hammered on the computer this summer by storm-caused power interruptions.

    (Always wondered what the previous two summers worth of those contributed to the premature failure of my previous HD, too).

    Info: http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp?id=1051384662012&skuId=5248172&type=product

    Why you need a UPS: http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp?id=cat12077&type=page&guideID=1043363120353&categoryRep=cat00001

    and:

    http://pcnineoneone.com/howto/ups1.html . Pete
     
  2. subratam

    subratam Registered Member

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    APC Back up here too :D
    UPS are a must to keep sensitive parts in the computer alive.
     
  3. bigc73542

    bigc73542 Retired Moderator

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    APC here also. just un plug out of the wall and keep active till the storm is over.
     
  4. puff-m-d

    puff-m-d Registered Member

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    I have used an APC UPS for about 3 years now.... Might just be me, but it seems my system has been more stable since having it ;) ....

    Regards,
    Kent
     
  5. bigc73542

    bigc73542 Retired Moderator

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    I believe that you get a more constant flow of power. Which is a good thing. ;)
     
  6. Valkyri001

    Valkyri001 Registered Member

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    ;)Check to see if you have Batteries or Capacitors.
    Capacitors are maintenance free and supply output power for limited time (short) interval.
    Batteries need to be discharged every now and then to maintain perfect condition and supply output power for limited (longer) interval.
    While batteries are lasting longer (suspended electrolite) they are not truly maintenance free, and they are much more expensive. Properly cared for they could ( theoretically ) last 20 / 30 years. I have a set that are 19 years old.
     
  7. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    Hmm - deeper technical specs reveal that it's "Surge Energy Rating" is 420 joules - is that good enough?

    The batteries (and it is batteries, not capacitors) are "Maintenance-free sealed lead-acid battery with suspended electrolyte: leakproof).

    So, I need to let them totally discharge now and again to get the most out of them? Jerk the plug and just let it do it's thing?

    Also, there's a newer version of the PowerChute software out that I've d/l'ed (I have 1.3 currently, but 1.4 is available) - but - I'm not seeing any way to shut down the existing PC software prior to un-installing it (there's no "Quit" or "Exit" on the right-click SYSTRAY icon for PowerChute).

    Maybe I'm just supposed to install the newer version "over-the-top"? But that doesn't seem like a good idea if the old version is actually running, does it? Does anyone know? Pete
     
  8. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    Okay, patient guy that I am (<g>), I went ahead and clicked to install the latest PowerChute software.

    It detected the old version, shut it down and installed the new with no problem. Pete
     
  9. HandsOff

    HandsOff Registered Member

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    Spy and Valk,

    No UPS, but I have a box of candles and an abicus...Just in case.

    actually, I wish i had a UPS, but would it really help? If I wasn't around and the power went out, does the software instruct the computer to shut itself down, or will it rely on me (a loosing proposition) to do something? If it doesnt then wouldn't it just delay the bad effect?

    I bet your right about the steady flow thing. for a circuit the fuctuations probably represent "wearing out".

    I am envisioning a $20.00 maintnance free model that will shut down my computer while I continue uninterupted sleep in my armchair.

    - HandsOff
     
  10. Cloudcroft

    Cloudcroft Registered Member

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    I got an APC UPS last year because of all the power drops in my small community. At one time last year during the summer, the power would drop several times a day, so the computer would restart each time. As far as I can tell, the UPS has prevented this from happening since it was installed. I should have gotten it years ago.
     
  11. Valkyri001

    Valkyri001 Registered Member

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    :Dspy1, thats correct, I do mine about every 2 months, which is excessive as the recommended is 2 times a year or once every six months. I also care for a set that is ( tested ) every 30 days, so how often you do them is entirely up to you. The new suspended electrolites are very good and will last 5 - 6 years without maintenance. In other words you don't have to do anything at all for that time period. Manufacturers say the period is 8 years but I have found some that only lasted 2 - 3 years unnattended. APC has some higher end stuff that most likely has software that can actually ( shutdown ) your machine, I'd check for that option. The joules thing is in laymans terms the amount of surge that it can handle. 420 is a very decent number for most local applications as your ( voltages ) should be fairly constant. Not more than 10% surge. ( ie: 120 + - 12 = 108 - 132 ) Most power plants are more worried about this than you are, so they are concerned at 117 - 123. Your UPS is filtering this to probably 3% or less. Some are 5%. As your motherboard can handle that 3% thing it doesn't like 5%. I just had to change a power supply the other day after a storm, but that was on an unprotected machine.
    :DHandsoff, Only the higher end UPS's will actually shut down ( log off ). Mostly they give you protecting during storms and such and when like Cloudcroft said, small power companies and large drops in power. The companies call it ( Henry's ), their generators can't handle large drops ( we all turn our ac's on at the same time ) and it takes the generators a time to catch up. Your voltage takes a jump and then as things settle down these swings go all over the place and your machine takes the beating and the heating, even the lower end UPS's can cure this type of problem.
    Hope this helps and doesn't confuse you more.
    UPS's in general will help you out. Add a really good Surge suppressor with about 1500 or more Joules protection for lightning and you'll be super safe. Thats were the money goes as these protectors are not cheap.
     
  12. 2dazed

    2dazed Registered Member

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    Spy1, Thanks for that 3rd link. I'll check it out later this afternoon. We just have snow storms where we're at right now, but anything protecting my baby girl here is worth looking into. :)
     
  13. 2dazed

    2dazed Registered Member

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    Spy1, Thanks for that 3rd link. I'll check it out later this afternoon. We just have snow storms where we're at right now, but anything protecting my baby girl here is worth looking into. :)
    Sorry for the double post. I backed up to check the notification box. Guess my little darlin' wanted to make sure Spy1 got the message. :rolleyes:
     
  14. HandsOff

    HandsOff Registered Member

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    I didn't know surge suppressors were that expensive. I rely on whaterver protection my triplite gives me. (essentially it is a box the has 5 separate switches for power and a master power switch). It probably offers no more protection than a power strip with a switch. On the bottom it says voltage protection is 500 V - (LN) whatever that means. I was at Fry's to by a power strip and they had one of their crazy deals where these boxes were cheaper than i power strip. Since I am a recovering gagetoholic I bought three.

    It really sounds smart to have a UPS, maybe when I have a few spare bucks.

    As an aside I have developed a bad habit of always leaving my computer on. It is a carryover from having a computer that took forever to boot. Hence the Five switch boxes. I got in the habit of turning off the monitor, speakers, modem, printer, and scanner, but leaving the brain on.

    Actually, I am somewhat proad that I can leave XP running for days and weeks. Sure could not do that with Windows 95!

    - HandsOff
     
  15. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    You're all quite welcome. (And, thanks, Valkyri001 for the "joules" info).

    The model I got (which cost $150+tax) does shut the computer down - you can either choose to have it shut down 5 minutes in to a power loss or or five minutes before the battery goes south.

    The amount drop or surge before it kicks in is also selectable.

    I'm slap tickled with it.

    HandsOff - a 500 volt surge would fry everything in your house. Pete
     

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