Google to Turn Over Identities of Anonymous Gmail Users

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by lotuseclat79, Sep 14, 2009.

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  1. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Registered Member

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    Internet firms help Canadian courts ID authors of controversial email.

    -- Tom
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 14, 2009
  2. axle00

    axle00 Registered Member

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    This is why I don't use any Google products...
     
  3. caspian

    caspian Registered Member

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    I have several gmail accounts. I use a different one for each message board that I belong too, and I NEVER login without first connection to Xerobank.

    More recently I have received some popups from Gmail wanting me to give them an alternate email.....claiming that they need it in case I lose my password. haha!
     
  4. box750

    box750 Registered Member

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    I stopped using Gmail the day the decided to scan for your incoming and outgoing email content in order to check it out and include what they call "relevant" advertising. Good riddance Gmail!
     
  5. Pfipps

    Pfipps Registered Member

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    I don't understand why people are solely criticizing google? This scanning of emails for ads/spam and responses to occurs on every type of web mail service. Also, even if you were an "anonymous" gmail user, a law enforcement agency or lawyer can simply get a subpoena to get the records from your ISP! This thread is more of a google bash than about understanding the total concern about privacy, and I am still concerned about the real issue.

    What I am concerned about, is that someone who is angry at a person behind an email can get a lawyer to get the records behind that address. The court process is more important than anything else. Obviously, there is a larger cost with the lawyer, but it is still a problem.

    Also, thought crimes aren't as pursued as vigorously in the US as compared to Canada and other European countries, and so I am not as concerned. The bottom line is to mask yourself as much as possible if you think you are at risk.
     
  6. I no more

    I no more Registered Member

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    Not if you create and access it like Caspian said. That's how to be truly anonymous. I only have one personally identifiable e-mail address with my ISP. Every other e-mail address I have was created through Tor (probably about 100 so far). Given that Tor is my ISP, good luck finding me. Someone can subpoena to their hearts content, and all they'll get for their trouble is the image of me flipping them off. :thumb:

    Edit: I don't have 100 e-mail addresses. I throw them away when I'm done.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2009
  7. Pfipps

    Pfipps Registered Member

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    I was talking about the focused Google bashing more than actually disagreeing with the privacy issue. But as I said, It is still difficult to get subpoenas because of all the hoops....I can see record companies doing so...but that's why I said masking was good.
     
  8. I no more

    I no more Registered Member

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    I know what you mean. I agree. We shouldn't think of Google as any worse than Yahoo, Microsoft, etc. Whether it's gmail or hushmail, I treat them all the same. They all get accessed through Tor.
     
  9. Less

    Less Registered Member

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    as long as there are proper proceedings or from the authorities for investigations...... it should be ok...
     
  10. Escalader

    Escalader Registered Member

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    Rather than do all this email id's why not just encrypt all your email? Unless you don't want to provide the unlock key to the guy on the other end of your message?

    I must be missing something:oops:
     
  11. CaixFang

    CaixFang Registered Member

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    That process just got a lot easier down in TX where it is now a crime to post threats or post multiple "harassing" posts on multiple sites against a user. (Ex you post on your ex's myspace and facebook that she is a hoe because she cheated on you with your best friend - you are now a criminal)

    Now that you have committed a crime under TX law, any court is going to grant a motion to reveal your identity based on your posts. Myspace, fb, ISP's, whomever aren't going to fight it, they are going to comply.

    Recently passed law down there, and they have already started using it and filing charges against teenagers "harassing" each other.

    Once the public accepts this law, it will just pave the way for easier access to who you are online, and I'm sure they are selling it under protecting your children, not opening the door to the end of privacy online.

    (Not that fb, myspace, etc are in any way private, much the contrary, but this is just the opening stages of this all. Today myspace, tomorrow everyplace....
     
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