Google is using fingerprint for account opening.

Discussion in 'privacy problems' started by Joao Silva BR, Apr 21, 2017.

  1. Joao Silva BR

    Joao Silva BR Registered Member

    Joined:
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    Brasil
    I did some testing and found out that:
    - If I do 24 hours without creating an account, it's done automatically. (http://i.imgur.com/QOJEEgq.png)
    - If I then create a new account, Google does the verification in 2 steps. (http://i.imgur.com/Dx3KVCj.png)
    (Always deleting cookies and resetting ip)

    This test can be done and reproduced as many times as you want.

    Creating multiple Google accounts is not the point here. I am vigilant about Google being acting like a spy on my device.


    I ran several tests, all Google can identify me: VirtualBox, OS formatting, Linux, Antidetect, Random Agent Spoofer, CanvasBlocker.
    (My idea is not to use these programs, but to test Google tracking)

    In Tor it is not possible to disable the proxy. Google blocks account creation by default. So it is not possible to verify.


    But...

    I did an ultimate test:
    - I stayed 24 hours without creating a Google account.
    - I entered Tor and tried to create the account. Tor allegedly blocked the Fingerprint Canvas.
    - Then I usually logged in to Firefox and tried to create an account. And Google has requested verification in 2 steps.
    (Always deleting cookies and resetting ip)

    Conclusion: Tor "leaked" the fingerprint to Google. So Google was able to compare the data and block on the second attempt (Firefox).


    Google, being a large corporation, must have developed some kind of Fingerprint technique. Similar to Canvas Fingerprint, but not identical, so it is not yet being blocked.
    It is also possible that another factor is being leaked by Tor, but equally dangerous and identifiable.


    If Google is using this undetectable technique in Google Accounts, they may well be using it in all their other services (Youtube, Search, Translate) and nobody knows.


    This is scary to me. What good is VPN and Tor services if companies are monitoring us with more sophisticated Fingerprint methods?


    (I used the translate for this post).
     
  2. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    What about IP address? Did you use a VPN service?

    Install VirtualBox, and create Debian and PC-BSD VMs. Install VPN clients in both VMs, using different services. The VMs have independent virtual disks, and no direct access to anything on the host disk. Debian and PC-BSD VMs have different virtual graphics drivers. So I doubt that Google can link activity on them.
     
  3. Joao Silva BR

    Joao Silva BR Registered Member

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    Location:
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    My ip address is dynamic. Just reboot the modem and ip update automatically.
    Look:
    Http://i.imgur.com/3z8ArOw.png
    Http://i.imgur.com/n31mcgk.png

    About VM and different Operating Systems:
    Actually, I had done a test with Windows XP and Windows 7 and they have different fingerprints. I did another test installing a second Windows 7, and Google detected that it was the same fingerprint. So it ends up being a binary solution.

    I believe there is currently no solution to this. This is an undetectable problem for Tor and other blockers. They can not block simply because they do not detect.

    If Google is using an unusual fingerprint algorithm, surely other companies are too. We surf the internet and we can cross with this algorithm on any site, we're being watched and receiving personalized content based on what they decided on us, and we do not even know.

    I believe that Tor and the plug-ins first need to identify the problem, and then find the solution.

    From the research point of view of what this is:
    - I found that by changing the resolution of the computer (independent of the browser screen) in many cases Google does not block. I do not know why. I suppose the resolution may interfere with the projection of the image on the screen (if it is a Canvas-like technique). Perhaps the experts can explain better.
    - I have another computer, here on the same network. Suppose I create a Google Account on my computer. Then I can create it on the other computer. In the 2 cases I can not create it on the second try.The network does not seem to be decisive for the blockade. Clearly it's something related to the motherboard or video card.
    - In another test I installed the same monitor on another computer with the same resolution. The result was similar to the previous test. It seems to indicate that the motherboard or graphics board are determining factors and the screen resolution is a secondary factor..
     
  4. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    Some sites can identify you by the way you type. I don't know if they can collect enough data during account setup to identify you this way. Though you can ask somebody else to try and create second account.
     
  5. Joao Silva BR

    Joao Silva BR Registered Member

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    Brasil
    I've come to think of it.

    But if this were valid in this case, I would not be able to create a second account on another computer on the same network.
     
  6. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    Yes, you're right, I missed that one.
     
  7. liba

    liba Registered Member

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