Global treaty may make your ISP spy on you

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by lotuseclat79, Feb 24, 2010.

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  1. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Registered Member

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    Global treaty may make your ISP spy on you.

    -- Tom
     
  2. tobacco

    tobacco Frequent Poster

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    Where's the "Starship Enterprise" when you need em. "Beam Me Off" this god forsaken planet :p
     
  3. MrBrian

    MrBrian Registered Member

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  4. Warlockz

    Warlockz Registered Member

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    This thread should be a sticky, everyone should know about this! they have been talking about it for like 6 years now, a plot to spy on everyone and an excuse to do it!
     
  5. Noob

    Noob Registered Member

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    Screw them, we will make our own internet then!! :D
     
  6. MrBrian

    MrBrian Registered Member

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  7. hierophant

    hierophant Registered Member

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    So what will they do with encrypted packets? I use secure VPNs for both work and play, as do many professionals. Some of my work is highly confidential, under court order. If the use of secure VPNs for file sharing became prevalent, as I presume it would, they'd have to individually investigate millions of users. That'd be quite a burden, IMHO, as well as unconstitutional.
     
  8. chronomatic

    chronomatic Registered Member

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    Most every torrent client already supports encryption. I have it setup in mine to always use encryption. However, where they get you is by having your IP address show up in a swarm. This is why it's a bad idea to use public torrent sites.
     
  9. hierophant

    hierophant Registered Member

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    If I did torrent, I'd use XeroBank, Mullvad or another anonymous VPN, with non-VPN traffic firewalled. I'd also put everything in an encrypted filesystem.
     
  10. apathy

    apathy Registered Member

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    Between these horrible international treaties and RIAA wanting your search engine, ISP, DNS hosting to police you, things are getting rough. it is even bad for some 5 year old kid dancing on youtube to some song that he didn't get written permission to play. Don't turn around! Der Kommissar's in town!!!
     
  11. noone_particular

    noone_particular Registered Member

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    File sharers should take several legitimate media files that the industry doesn't have any control over, encrypt them several different ways, then continuously send them back and forth through the file sharing networks. Overload their traffic monitoring until they surrender.

    About the only way people can stop or slow down this process towards total surveillance is to resist it. Give them all what they're looking for, in system choking quantities.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2010
  12. Konata Izumi

    Konata Izumi Registered Member

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    Oh my god! :eek:
     
  13. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    Like a few long movies in the public domain from archives.org:
    http://www.archive.org/details/feature_films
     
  14. noone_particular

    noone_particular Registered Member

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    That's one example. Recordings of road noise or a bunch of musician wanna-be's making noise in a garage. Open Source software and operating systems packed into ISOs that are the same size as Windows setup disks or commonly pirated apps. The better P2P apps have schedulers built in that could do this automatically at hours the user need the bandwidth. E-mails containing all the keywords they look for along with gibberish or a simple message such as "monitor this". Scripts could enable them to be sent, resent, and deleted. Scripts could send encrypted gibberish through instant messaging apps.
    If we don't stand up and say "enough", it'll keep getting worse.
     
  15. MrBrian

    MrBrian Registered Member

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  16. Tarnak

    Tarnak Registered Member

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    With international treaties like this we are doomed/damned! ;)
     
  17. cm1971

    cm1971 Registered Member

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    No kidding. If the RIAA had their way there would be no Internet.
     
  18. Pinga

    Pinga Registered Member

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  19. vasa1

    vasa1 Registered Member

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    Pity the fool who has to monitor me. Paint drying will be more exciting.
     
  20. PJC

    PJC Very Frequent Poster

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    Since my ISP sees everything I see,
    I am Not surprised at all...;)
     
  21. Pinga

    Pinga Registered Member

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    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/blog/2010/dec/22/you-ask-we-search-december-22
     
  22. hierophant

    hierophant Registered Member

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    Maybe you ought to do something about that, then ;) Or not, as you like.
     
  23. PJC

    PJC Very Frequent Poster

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    Any suggestion?
    Since ISPs see everything, and I do Not want any Browsing-Speed reduction...
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2010
  24. hierophant

    hierophant Registered Member

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    ISPs (and their friends/masters) do indeed see all your traffic, and so you want that traffic to provide as little information as possible. By connecting via Tor or an "anonymous VPN" service, you reveal only its entry URL, and hide the sites that you're connecting to. You also hide your IP address from those sites.

    Also, when connecting via Tor or an "anonymous VPN" service, your traffic to the service's entry node (and indeed, until its exit node) is encrypted. That provides privacy from all participants between you and the service's exit node. If your content is sensitive, you'll want to also use end-to-end encryption (e.g., TLS/SSL and OpenPGP).

    For Tor, I believe that Vidalia is your best choice as a new user. There are many "anonymous VPN" services, and they've been thoroughly discussed in many threads on Wilders.

    Of course, in using an "anonymous VPN" service, you are trusting its operators, in the same way that you'd otherwise be trusting your ISP. In using Tor, OTOH, you are trusting its design and integrity.

    It's unlikely that either approach will substantively reduce your browsing speed, unless you're downloading or uploading very large files. In my experience, Tor is much faster now than it used to be. However, if you need more than 1-2 Mbps, you'll want an "anonymous VPN" service.
     
  25. blitzman

    blitzman Registered Member

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    Excellent thoughts..
     
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