ghostwall vs windows firewall

Discussion in 'Other Ghost Security Software' started by richo, Jan 29, 2006.

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  1. richo

    richo Registered Member

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    I was wondering what the key differences were between Ghostwall & Windows Firewall (in XP2), & what advantages Ghostwall may have. Also, does Ghostwall protect adequately with default "out of the box" settings?
    Many thanks.
     
  2. SwordOfSecurity

    SwordOfSecurity Registered Member

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    you can find the differences on the website for ghostwall for this. but imo, i think they are relatively the same, except ghostwall is a bit more flexible with a few useful options, such as: block/allow all traffic button, basic rules that you can set, and relatively detailed logs. the default rules settings should be fine for ghostwall (i remember asking this before) according to some other forum members--although i wish they didn't have just those basic ones for your protection (seems like its not enough and too basic). if you are relatively unknowledgeable for firewalls, i would say windows firewall would be easier for you (windows icf still passed the shields up tests perfectly). however, ghostwall is better for the people who know how to use firewalls a bit more
     
  3. richo

    richo Registered Member

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    Thanks for the reply. I suspect you're right... Windows firewall is probably adequate, I'm tired of using security products that use too many resources. GhostWall however does seem like a good quality "light" firewall.
     
  4. pbajoe

    pbajoe Registered Member

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    Ghostwall actually functions more like a hardware, rule-based firewall than the Windows Firewall. For example, how could you block an IP in the Windows Firewall from connecting to your machine? I don't think you can without some trickery in the Windows Firewall. Ghostwall, it's easy. Just add a rule. A few months ago I built a new server for a gaming clan I'm a member (and leader) of. Unlike predecessors, I wanted a better way to be able to block gamers from coming in and crashing the game. Or at least stop them from coming back and doing it again. I would be using only Ghostwall but for the life of me, could not get Remote Desktop to work through Ghostwall. I had TCP 3389 opened in Ghostwall but RD would not work. So, I had to resort to using the Windows Firewall in XP x64. Then I got the idea to just use Ghostwall to block specific IP's and then an Allow All rule at the end. I move the rules of blocked IP above the Allow All rule and voila!

    So, now when we have a game crasher in the server, we grab her IP and create a rule in Ghostwall and they no longer can crash our server. Now of course, if he happens to have DHCP from his ISP, then he could be back but in the case of one person, I banned their whole subnet. Most are static addresses anyway, so it's already proved it's value! Plus it shows you the last 50 blocked addresses and tracks bandwidth usage. The only downside is the user logged on must be a local Admin or Ghostwall will give an error and not start.

    So, I'd have to disagree that Ghostwall and the Windows Firewall are the same or similar. Ghostwall is much better and if someone could get RDP working through it, there wouldn't be a need for the Windows Firewall at all. And Ghostwall is free to boot as well (but you already knew that).

    Joe
     
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