Fitting a new harddrive

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by Michael_aust, May 26, 2005.

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  1. Michael_aust

    Michael_aust Registered Member

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    I am wantng to fit a new harddrive to my computer. I was just wondering if I am correct in how you do it. Unscrew the current hard drive out new one in reattach the ide cable and power into the new one and fire my machine back up. Is that all there is to it? Or is there a little more I need to do like fiddle in the bios or anything? I simply wanting to remove my current 80gb and put in a 120 gb or something because i want to isntal SUSE but the manufacturer of my pc have done something to the harddrive that is preventing me.

    Is that all there is to it?

    Michael :)
     
  2. ME-MARJA

    ME-MARJA Guest

    MICHAEL, DIDN'T YOUR NEW HD COME WITH A CD TO 'WALK' YOU THROUGH THE PROCESS FIRST??

    ARE YOU SURE IT IS COMPATIBLE WITH ALL YOUR OTHER COMPONENTS?

    THIS MIGHT SOUND SILLY - BUT, ARE YOU SURE IT FITS IN THE DRIVE SPACE? ALOT OF PEOPLE DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT THAT- MAKES FOR A FRUSTRATING DAY!

    PUTTING IN THE HD, ISN'T THE HARDEST PART, IT'S MAKING SURE IT 'GETS' ALONG WITH THE REST OF YOUR COMPUTER, THERE SHOULD BE A CD WITH YOUR NEW HARD DRIVE...........??
     
  3. ME-MARJA

    ME-MARJA Guest

    YOU SHOULDN'T HAVE TO 'MESS' WITH ANYTHING ELSE, I NEVER HAD TO.

    JUST MY OPINION, SURE THERE ARE MORE PROS OUT THERE!

    CHEERS!

    MARJA:cool:
     
  4. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    Mike,

    I am assuming that you want a fresh install, that you don't want or need the data from the old drive. And I am assuming that you want only one drive in the system. Please correct me if my assumptions are wrong.

    Generally, the swap is as simple as you said. You must make sure that the jumpers on the new drive is set the same as the old drive. The BIOS should recognize the drive. There are exceptions to this however.

    Some old, and I mean OLD systems, need to be told specifics about the drive in the BIOS. Some systems do not like the CS (Cable Select) jumper setting, they prefer either SL (Slave), or MA (Master). You will have to play with these.

    Also, if the drive is an newer 80 conductor ATA cable, with a blue connector on one end, then the blue connector must be plugged into the motherboard.

    Here are some articles that explain things better than I can:

    40 Conductor:
    http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/confCable-c.html
    80 Conductor:
    http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/confCable80-c.html

    Please post the make and model of your PC so that I can help you more efficiently.
     
  5. Michael_aust

    Michael_aust Registered Member

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    Yeh im just doing a simple swap between the old one and new one. I dont have anything really to transfer over. The stuff I do want to keep like music I already have backed up to cd so its alright. Yeh I think it should be compatable with my current hardware. I havent done anything to my computer at all. I'm just going to buy a bog standard 120 gb maxtor ide drive. There are not really any specialist parts on my pc its prtty much just a bog standard family computer. I havent bought it yet, sol il check the measurments out.

    The computer isnt old I bought it like last september time. I have asked a friend about the particular drive im buiyng as he has purchased the exact same drive, infact it was the one he recomended to me and he said it was a straight forward instalation, even with really specific specialist components.

    Im only going to be doing a straight swap. Having to set up my computer for two drives is to advanced for me as I havent really fitted much to cpmputers other then cd drives and ram. Plus id need to go out and buy new cables as well an figure out where they plug into on the motherboard etc.

    I'm not sure if the hdd comes with a walk through cd. If it as easy as replacing a cd drive then I shoudltn have any problems I managed to do that without any trouble.

    So from what I have said should it be straight forward do you think?

    The make of my pc Is Iqon, I think its a small Irish company. Nearly all the multimedia parts are made by philips. I'm not sure what model it is. The companonets are petty bog standard.

    Thanks for your help

    Michael.
     
  6. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    Most new hard drives come with a cable. It is just as easy to add another drive as it is to replace one. Just make your new drive a slave.
    Western Digital as well as most of them come with easy to follow instructions and all the software you need.
     
  7. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    Since your computer is that new, you more than likely have the 80 conductor cable with three connectors as illustrated:

    http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/z_000553idecable80.jpg

    If you want a two drive system, it is quite simple. Put the master (boot) drive on the connector at the end of the cable. Put the slave drive on the connector middle. You may be able to leave both of the jumpers at CS (Cable Select). If the BIOS does not recognize the drives then set the slave to SL, and the master to MA. Don't be afraid to dive in. Even if you plug the cable in wrong, or set the wrong jumpers, you won't break anything.

    iQon PC
     
  8. Michael_aust

    Michael_aust Registered Member

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    When you day they come with all the software id need. What exactly do you mean by it. What does the software do?
     
  9. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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  10. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    Not to speak for Ronjor, but what I think he is talking about is the software that comes with some drives, like Western Digital. In your case, you will not need to use the software.

    Here is an example of some of the software that comes with Western Digital drives:

    http://support.wdc.com/download/index.asp?cxml=n&pid=4&swid=1

    I usually put the software disk in a drawer and forget about it. It used to be with old PCs that you needed the software to access the entire drive. The older PCs had a limitation on how much drive space that they could access on one partition. You do not have this problem.
     
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