Error: E000101F4: Failed to write data on the disk

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by 1980MetalHead, Mar 13, 2009.

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  1. 1980MetalHead

    1980MetalHead Registered Member

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    I'm trying to restore a backup image to a RAID 0 using ATI 11 (build 8101) and I get the titled message error. I just reinstalled Windows XP and then reinstalled ATI 11 and tried the restore. I tried earlier to restore and clicked on Ignore All and it gave me the missing NTLDR file message. Needless to say it screwed up everything. Here is my previous posting in regards to my problem: https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=235971

    Anyone have any ides?:blink: o_O
     
  2. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    You gave the critical piece of information in your previous post:

    The problem is that in order to restore the boot partition, whether on a single disk or a RAID array, TI has to reboot into the Linux environment whether the restore is started from Windows or from the Rescue CD.

    When you boot from the TI Rescue CD, you can see the problem more easily. The C: RAID array is not seen, only the backup drive. Therefore, it's not possible to restore the backup. You need a boot disk that can see your RAID array, that is one that has the proper drivers to support your RAID chip set.

    There are several possibilities. The first is a Linux Rescue CD that has newer drivers. The fastest is to download the TI 2009 Trial, install it on any computer and create the 2009 Rescue CD. Test that to see if it can see your RAID array. The 2009 Rescue CD will restore TI 11 backup images.

    Because there are some reports of problems uninstalling TI 2009, it would be best if you installed it on a system that has a full backup that can be restored if necessary to "remove" TI 2009.

    You could also contact TI Tech Support and ask them to provide an ISO image of a boot disk that supports your RAID. The Tech Suppor Chat is probably the fastest way to get support.

    Other possible boot disks are a BartPE or WinPE boot disk with the TI 2009 plugin. You can use the WinPE disk on an XP system to restore an image made with TI 11. The easiest way to create one of these disks is to pick the WinPE disk and create it on a system with TI 2009 installed using Mustang's PE builder. Here are the links:

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=222284
    http://www.mechrest.com/plugins/index.html

    I'm not sure whether Mustang's system will work with the trial version of TI 2009. You could ask him about that on his web site (the second link).

    Let us know how you decide to proceed and the outcome.
     
  3. 1980MetalHead

    1980MetalHead Registered Member

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    I downloaded ATI 2009 and created a boot CD. I got it to see my RAID hard drives. It shows them as D: not C:. My extra internal HD is labeled as C:. I've tried the restore twice now and it shows the folders in the drive, but it won't boot into Windows. I get the "windows root system32 hal.dll corrupt or missing" error message. I've tried rebooting and repairing Windows with an install disc, but bootcfg /rebuild doesn't work saying it "failed to successfully scan disks for Windows installations. This error may be caused by a corrupt file system, which would prevent Bootcfg from successfully scanning." it then tells me to chkdsk, which I have done countless times now and every time I get "The volume appears to contain one or more unrecoverable problems." When I do a dir of the drive D: I get nothing. It shows my folders and files in my other internal drive. I've tried getting to the i386 folder on the Windows XP, but no success although the dir shows them. I'm stuck and I'm about to just reinstall Windows from scratch simply because ATI 11 or 2009 won't work properly. Any more ideas? Would greatly appreciate it before I scrap it. :doubt:
     
  4. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    This isn't unusual in the Linux environment. At least all the drives are visible. However, the file corruption is not normal.

    It's possible that the Linux drivers are not right for your system. In a case such as this, a BartPE boot disk with the TI plug in would allow you to add the Windows drivers for your RAID chip set on booting.

    It's also possible that there is a problem with one of the hard drives in the RAID array. If you have a disk for checking the drives, run that and confirm that the array has no errors.

    Attempting to do a clean reinstall of Windows would be another test for drive and memory problems. It would allow you to run CHKDSK C: /R on the RAID array to see if there are any errors.

    I'm sure you are very frustrated at this point. It's really annoying when a backup system fails to restore. Unfortunately, until you've tested the restore you don't know whether you really have a useful backup.

    If it's possible, it might be worthwhile taking one of the drives in the RAID array and setting it up as a single drive and attempting a restore to it. That assumes that one drive is large enough to hold the full restore.
     
  5. 1980MetalHead

    1980MetalHead Registered Member

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    Interesting. I will try and do a chkdsk on each drive. I did once do a fresh install of Windows XP, and it seemed to be fine. I want to to avoid a fresh install of Windows and Office due the hassle of having to call Microsoft and do the activation thing! That's why I got Acronis. After I check each disk I will try a restore to one of the disks to see if it works properly. The BartPe with AT drivers? I've tried BartPe once and didn't get too acquainted with it. :doubt:
     
  6. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    Sounds like a good plan.

    The True Image Plug-in for the BartPE is on the Acronis web site. There are links to instructions on how to create a BartPE disk on the forum.

    If it has been more than six months since you activated XP on this system, you can proably do a clean reinstall, even with lots of new hardware, without any problem with having to call to get it activated. At least, that has been my experience. If you do have to call, they don't really hassle you as long as you just explain that it's the same computer but you added new... They then give you a new install code to use.

    I'd like to hear how things go.
     
  7. 1980MetalHead

    1980MetalHead Registered Member

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    I've actually re-installed Windows XP so many times due to rebuilding my computer about 3 times, that each time I have to do a fresh install I have to call - I'm talking at least 20 times of re-installing over the past 6 years! Right now I'm trying to restore my image to just one of my 150 GB Raptors to see if it'll take. I'm not sure, but I think I may found one other thing that was causing my problem. I have a ASUS A8N-SLI Premium motherboard that has two different ways of setting up RAID. One is to use a separate controller from the regular SATA slots. The separate controller is Silicon Image, and it when the drives are hooked up they do not display in BIOS unless they set in a RAID ARRAY. When I hook them to the regular SATA slots then I can set the RAID ARRAY using NVIDIA RAID drivers. Now the drives show in BIOS, but I do not have them set in RAID ARRAY. Well, while typing this the restore completed, but I still get the "windows root system32 hal.dll corrupt or missing" error message. I guess now I can try the bootcfg/rebuild trick to see if it works. What a hassle! :mad:

    Tried the Windows repair and it now actually sees the Windows installation where it didn't before. It wouldn't rebuild, but I'm now doing a chkdsk /r, which is taking a while. I'm crossing my fingers!
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2009
  8. 1980MetalHead

    1980MetalHead Registered Member

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    Well, here's the rest of the story! The first Raptor I restored wouldn't work after trying several chkdsk's and it did state it found and repaired one or more problems. I then took the second Raptor and did a restore to it, and it booted into Windows. I bought these Raptors a little over a year ago, so I guess I'll be contacting Western Digital about a replacement. What a freakin' headache! :eek:

    I guess I'll be using one instead of two Raptors for now.

    Thanks John for the suggestions. It did make me dig deeper into the problem though it wasn't what I wanted to find. :)
     
  9. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    That's sure a good news/bad news result. Actually, you are very lucky that you tried the bad Raptor first. If you had picked the other one, you'd have thought the problem was due to the RAID settings or chip sets.

    After reading a bit about RAID 0, I've concluded that it's not of any value unless it is impossible to buy a drive large enough for what is needed. That's not likely to be the case today when 1-1.5 TB drives are not too expensive.

    I know RAID 0 is supposed to be faster than a single drive, but the benchmarks I've seen show very little improvement. However, the complexity can cause very significant difficulties as you have found.

    Certainly, you need an image backup program like TI if you have had to reinstall Windows so many times. I have a test machine that I have restored perhaps a third that many times in the last five years. TI has made it quick and easy to get back to a clean or simpler previous state or to switch from a smaller to a larger hard drive. I've never had to do a clean reinstall.

    I hope you have the same good fortune now that you are getting the problem sorted out.

    My experience with WD has been very good in replacing drives under warranty. They send the new drive, and you send the old drive back in the box the new drive came in. It's quick and cheap. For a reasonable price, you can upgrade a drive instead of doing a straight replacement if you decide to go that route.

    Let me know the final round in this battle, but it's clear that you are the winner. :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2009
  10. 1980MetalHead

    1980MetalHead Registered Member

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    I downloaded the diagnostics tools from WD and did a write zeros and full media scan on the suspected Raptor with no errors. Since I have an image I know works I plan on cleaning the other Raptor and setting up my RAID 0 again and see if I can get it working again. Sounds crazy, but I hate giving up when testing shows its okay. I've learned alot over the years from just testing what I can from forums and besides it fun! As far as performance with RAID, I've noticed the speed difference. I've always used 7200 RPM drives and always read setting up RAID is faster. I made the investment and bought two WD Raptors that spin at 10,000 RPM and set them up in RAID 0. It whizzed thru the Windows install a little over 20 minutes. Boot up time was real short. I even bought two WD 7200 RPM SATA II drives and set my son's computer up in RAID 0 and it was faster. A few days ago I used TI to restore his computer (too many games installed mucked it up) and it worked flawlessly, so I know the program works. I guess it depends if someone wants to spend the extra money and time to set up a RAID ARRAY for faster performance or not. I have several external HD's and one NAS with 300 GB so extra storage is not a problem. I personally wanted the RAID just for speed, not capacity. All-in-all if my next attempt fails, then I will contact WD for a replacement. I'll let you know what happens. Thanks. :cool:
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2009
  11. 1980MetalHead

    1980MetalHead Registered Member

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    This is unbelievable! Or maybe not. I fought with this problem until 2:20 in the morning and gave up. I decided to sleep on it. I got up and decided to go back to my studying for A+ days (never got certified) and changed the SATA cable. The end on the HD side was a 90-degree angle connector. I had run all the diagnostics and it said the drive was fine with no errors. I swapped with a new cable, set it back it back to my original RAID controller, did another restore, and wallah - I've got Windows! All of this for just a freakin' cable. After countless hours over about five days of fighting this problem it comes down to a simple cable. Well, I hope this helps someone else. :) :)

    George
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2009
  12. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    That is one of the amazing things about computers, but you are on the bleeding edge with a 10,000 RPM drive, so there's more stress on each part. It is odd that the diagnostics didn't have a problem with the cable, but TI does put a heavy load on the system when restoring.

    Good detective work.
     
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