Electrical carriage of Network

Discussion in 'hardware' started by tradetime, May 15, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. tradetime

    tradetime Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2006
    Posts:
    1,000
    Location:
    UK
    Hi, have a question regarding the use of this type of device in the home.
    http://www.ebuyer.com/product/150039
    Given that most houses in a street run off the same powerline, is it possible that a network setup in your hme using this could carry, say to your nextdoor neighbour, or even beyond?
     
  2. tradetime

    tradetime Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2006
    Posts:
    1,000
    Location:
    UK
    No thoughts?
     
  3. BlueZannetti

    BlueZannetti Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2003
    Posts:
    6,590
    Well, as the link that you provided explicitly indicated....
    so..., do the math.

    Short answer - yes - treat like wireless.

    Blue
     
  4. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Posts:
    2,272
    Location:
    Nebraska, USA
    I would not use them. In theory, they should work fine, and I am sure they do work fine, in a controlled setup. But house wiring is often old, not up to code, not properly grounded, and should never be assumed good. Unless you KNOW your house wiring is good, I would choose another method for networking.
     
  5. YeOldeStonecat

    YeOldeStonecat Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Posts:
    2,345
    Location:
    Along the Shorelines somewhere in New England
    Yes they can, depending on your neighborhood, proximity of neighbors, distance, etc etc. Like mentioned above...treat it like wireless...secure it. The powerline adapters come with easy to follow instructions for setting up encryption so you can secure your own network and keep the neighbors out.

    I've used them myself....currently living in an old 3 story farmhouse, poor quality electrical in it. Worked fairly well when running 2 of them, when I added a 3rd..started having issues (had to powercycle them once or twice week). This was back when powerline adapters first came out, they've improved/matured since then. Better than wireless in many aspects.
     
  6. tradetime

    tradetime Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2006
    Posts:
    1,000
    Location:
    UK
    Ok thanx for the replies
     
  7. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Posts:
    2,272
    Location:
    Nebraska, USA
    Sure that is possible but note the signal is not very strong and distance matters too. I think apartment dwellers should be especially cautious as
    Absolutely. With wireless, a badguy can be hiding in the bushes, or parked across the street, or even further away if equipped with a simple directional antenna and at least see your wireless network. So anything that does not transmit RF is capable of being much more secure. If I had my choice of using house wiring or wireless, I would use Ethernet. :doubt: Okay - if that is not a choice, use the most current 802.11x standard wireless technology and secure it to the max. Sadly, the wireless industry continues to procrastinate settling on a standard so we are still, after way too many years, only at 802.11n-Draft. This means Linksys/Cisco, Netgear, D-Link, etc. do not have to guarantee their 11n-Draft products are 100% compatible with each other's 11n-Draft products. And, as seen way too often, they are not. So much to the delight of these procrastinators, it is often recommended you purchase all your wireless devices from the same maker (see why they may not be anxious to settle on a standard? :().

    My problem with a house wiring network is more safety than security - not discounting security at all, however - as that is a given. Anything that can plug into the wall can kill! Setting that minor detail aside too, another problem is noise - electronic noise, also called interference - not good for network performance. Other devices in the building can, and often do, introduce unwanted anomalies on the circuit. When these anomalies are big, we call them surges, spikes, sags, and dips - all bad, and the very reason all computers should be on a UPS.

    Anomalies routinely occur any time a high-wattage device cycles on and off. These devices include refrigerators, toasters, coffee pots, microwave ovens, hair dryers, water coolers, etc. If any of those type devices/appliances are nearby, even in the best wiring circumstances, I would not trust test powerline network adapters to isolate the anomalies from the rest of my hardware, or my data.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.