Downloads from NewEgg.com...

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by data7, May 13, 2006.

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  1. data7

    data7 Registered Member

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    Since it appears that downloading the current build for TI9 from acronis is a must, has anyone purchashed TI9 from NewEgg.com, and subsequently downloaded the latest version from Acronis after registering? Thanks.

    Regards
     
  2. rafael

    rafael Registered Member

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    I bought a retail ( boxed ) copy of TI 9.0 from newegg.com, registered the product ID found in the manual, and downloaded the updated build.
    Don't forget to copy your user name and password to access future updates.
     
  3. Secure1

    Secure1 Registered Member

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    I bought my copy from Newegg. Worked fine. I just registered and downloaded the latest update from Acronis after I got the serial number and initial download from Newegg.
     
  4. data7

    data7 Registered Member

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    Thanks for the info! So, it sounds like NewEgg.com provides a serial number when you purchase the "download" version from them. I was concerned that I may not get the needed product code when I purchase the "download" version, that seems to come in the user manual with the "boxed" version.

    Are there any special caveats to be aware of when installing the latest version of TI9 from the Acronis website? Thanks again!

    Regards
     
  5. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    If you are installing vers 9 overtop v8; and if you are using the Acronis Secure zone, you will need to un-install the old zone and re-create the new zone.
     
  6. data7

    data7 Registered Member

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    Thanks for the tip!

    It sounds like the "Secure Zone" could be quite for life saver if you suddenly cannot boot into Windows.

    Regards
     
  7. Tatou

    Tatou Registered Member

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    Hello data7

    As a long time user I would not suggest using the Secure Zone unless there is no other option because of your configuration.

    I suggest either an external USB drive or another internal drive to store the tib file if you are backing up your system drive (or other partition/drive).

    Don't forget to build yourself an ATI Boot disk so you can boot if your system drive or partition goes west.

    The other way to boot is with a Bartpe disk. A BartPE boot disk is handy if not essential as it allows you to boot into a Window's environment which is faster for a lot of people than the Linux based Acronis version. You can use the plugin from Acronis or the Mustang version. At www.reatogo.de you can find the easist way to build BartPE.
     
  8. data7

    data7 Registered Member

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    Okay, thanks for the help.

    Actually, I was not aware that using the Secure Zone feature is not advisable. I guess I don't quite underatand the reason for this.

    At this point I don't have an extra hard drive or usb drive to use for backups. My plan was to create the .tib files on my C drive, and then copy them to a DVD using Roxio 6. My C drive only amounts to about 18 GB, so I thought that this would not be too difficult. Buying a separate USB drive for only 18 GB seems a little extreme. Perhaps I am missing something though.

    Regards
     
  9. Tatou

    Tatou Registered Member

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    Hello again

    For some people the Secure Zone works well but as you will see here there is a lot of discussion around problems people. My biggest worry would be if you have it on your c drive then if the drive goes bad then your backup has gone bad too.

    To me it adds another bit of complexity to the whole operation. I prefer to have my backups remote from the computer so I can store them away from home. I also keep another backup on an another internal IDE drive


    However your DVD solution is better than the direct writing. It really comes down to time and convenience.

    How often are you going to backup the 18gig?

    Thats 9 DVD's if you follow Acronis in the FAQ. They recommend 2 gig on each DVD as the file size on a DVD is usually limited to 2 gig. Else follow Resident True Image Guru "Menorcaman" suggestions in an earlier post

    Many people prefer to use the "two-step" method as they find it more reliable. In this case, you create a split image to your HD and then burn either DVD-ROM (ISO) or DVD-ROM (UDF) compilations onto blank DVD+/-R or DVD+/-RW disks. If a DVD+/-RW has previously been UDF formatted then it must first be "blanked" by erasing the UDF file system via your UDF packet writing software.

    When creating the initial image to your hard drive, choose the option to split the size manually and just type in the required size into the space provided (ignore the drop down pick-list). For DVD-ROM (ISO) compilations, enter a size of 1492 MB and burn up to a maximum of three .tib files per DVD. If planning to burn DVD-ROM (UDF) compilations then enter a size of 4.3 GB. Ensure you burn "Single Session" compilations and that each DVD is "Finalized" as part of the burn process. I also strongly recommend that you reduce the burn speed to around half the maximum rated speed of your DVD recorder or media being used, whichever is the lesser. This greatly reduces the likelyhood of data corruption because modern, high-speed, recorders can be too clever for their own good when it comes to burning a full disk of pure data (one bad byte on single disk renders the whole image useless).

    Whichever method you use to create a multiple-DVD image, when the time comes to verify or restore it, you need to insert the last disk first and then follow TI's prompts for subsequent changes. Therefore it's a good idea to number each disk with a marker pen after it's been recorded.



    You will need to verify tib files on hard drive and also verify when u burn to DVD

    This will take time and needs you to be present to change DVDs. Where a external or internal drive can be backed up to and verified easily. If storing remotely from the computer is important then a USB enclosure and IDE drive is the bees knees.

    Your call of course but having tried DVDs once I won't go back.
     
  10. shieber

    shieber Registered Member

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    Disk drives are relatively cheap and ideally, you will keep more than one backup. So a second Harddisk is a good Idea if you can swing the bucks. Although you are only backing up 18gb, you could keep several copies on a drive that was larger.

    If your system seems totally screwed up you can restore an image from, say, yesterday, but find out that, the system screw-up actually had already occured by then. In which cas it will be nice if you can go back to an earlier backup. How often you make an image and how many you keep is a matter of choice.

    Also, as has been pointed out already, if your drive goes south, a secure zone on that drive won't be any help. However, an image on another drive means you could replace the drive that went south, restroe the image, and be back in business quickly, having lost no more data changes than occured between when you made the back and when you restored.

    good luck,
    sh
     
  11. data7

    data7 Registered Member

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    I probably would not need to back up more than once a month or so. It sounds like the USB drive is the way to go. Not being all that familiar with USB drives, my understanding is that I can purchase a USB 2.0 drive (100 GB or so) and merely connect it to my USB 2.0 port. The internal connection inside the device should not be a concern, and the power will come from the USB connection. Please correct me if I am off base here. Thanks for the help!

    Regards
     
  12. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    There is a lot of good common sense in the preceding posts. Much comes down to a matter of personal preferences.

    If your backups reside solely inside the Acronis Secure Zone, you have a major risk. The drive can fail or become corrupt.
    If your backups reside solely inside an external drive, you still have a major risk. Again, the drive can fail or be corrupted or infected.
    If you store your backups on both, your odds of recovery are greatly improved that at least one set of backups will be available when needed.
    If you additionally store them on CD or DVD, odds improved even more. This gives you 3 or 4 different avenues to hope your data will be accessible.

    I personally have my Acronis Secure zone created on a second internal drive. If my boot drive fails, I do not loose my backup files. If the user has only a single hard drive, then being able to create the secure zone provides storage space for backups. Any backup is better than no backup but relying only on the Secure Zone is very unsafe.

    ....my current backup procedure & programs:
    1. I perform most of my full image backups from inside the Recovery Console at bootup so there is no issue of "files in use", etc. You can backup to any device from inside the Recovery console. Or, optionally, you can create backups/recovery by booting using a user created Acronis Boot CD.

    2. I create/store one set of always current backups inside the Acronis Secure Zone (hidden partition).
    3. I create/store additional sets of reasonably current backups on other internal and external drives (both used). File size adjusted to fit CD or DVD's. I alternate using both Acronis TrueImage 9 and PowerQuest Drive Image 7.

    4. I copy the CD sized backups files (created in step 2) from the to cd or dvd's.
    5. I never create a backup directly to CD or DVD media. It takes too long. I do not have the patience to babysit the computer waiting to feed individual CD's.
    • Finally:
      a. If I lose my boot drive, I can create a new one using this software either to clone or restore from the Acronis Secure Zone; or the other internal or external drives; or the backup set stored on CD/DVD.
      b. Or, if I lose the other internals or even the other externals, I still have all the multiple set of cd's which I have accumulated.
      c. Recovery time would be within minutes--not hours or days. Following my procedure, I have multiple options in recovery restoration.

    Simply put, you need multiple methods of storing your backups. If one method fails, you needs alternate choices. That's why I store my backups on four different devices/media. I use my computer only for non-business use but would not want to have to recover by having to re-install XP and all my programs. An image restore is my choice for recovery. It is quick and efficient and easy to do.
     
  13. rafael

    rafael Registered Member

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    I used to back up in the same hard drive and later on copy the back ups to rewritable dvds.These dvds require care. Will have errors due to warping when stored at high temperature or get scratched over time from handling.

    Since hard drives have become cheap, I now have a cloned hard drive which I update once a month. And an external hard drive for daily back ups, connected to USB using an inexpensive IDE to USB adaptor from newegg.com. Once funding permits, I will buy an enclosure with built-in cooling fan/s to house the external drive. This setup works for me. It's simple and very reliable so far. I still use dvds from time to time for backups of very important data and jobs for additonal peace of mind. These dvds are stored in fire-proof safe away from my computer.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2006
  14. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Rafael,
    It is in your best interest to NOT use re-writable media for backups. Use once and finalize. Any of our hard drives including the USB can get ruined by one major disaster. Keep the media uptodate that is stored in the safe.
     
  15. data7

    data7 Registered Member

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    I was under the impression that smaller USB drives are available that are simply a hard drive that is connected to the system by the USB connector, and is not housed in an enclosure that provides a connection from the IDE to USB conector. Perhaps I am mistaken on this.

    Regards
     
  16. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    You can get anything from a fancy enclosure to what appears to be nothing more than some cables. Obviously there is an IDE / USB chipset in the adapter somewhere.

    I don't use external drives of any kind but perhaps somebody can address the power supply issue. Is the power delivered by a USB port adequate or do you have to have (or better to have) a "brick" power supply for the device. I raise this because of a post where the poster burned out the USB ports on his MB because of using a SATA/USB box.
     
  17. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    If it were me,
    I would not connect a USB hard drive to my computer unless it had its own external power supply.

    I would not buy a hard drive enclosure which does not come with its own power supply. Just read the specs carefully as to what the kit includes.
     
  18. x=y+z

    x=y+z Registered Member

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    Most enclosures for 2.5” hard drives do not need external power supplies because they can operate on USB bus power. I have three 2.5” USB2.0 enclosures that run on USB bus power without any problems. On the other hand, enclosures for 3.5” hard drives do require external power supplies.
     
  19. rafael

    rafael Registered Member

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    I have stopped using rewritable dvds since write-onces are now very cheap
     
  20. rafael

    rafael Registered Member

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    The IDE to USB adaptor I have came with a power supply. I have been using this for almost a year with no problems at all.
     
  21. shieber

    shieber Registered Member

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    Same here. No probs whatsoever running the 2.5" drives (really laptop drives in a small case with a built in adaptor) using the USB power source. The need for external power depends on the power requirments of the drive -- if they exceed what the USB source can provide, then you *need* another power source -- you don't *need* one otherwise. It so happens that the 2.5" drives tend to fall within the margin for the USB power while large format drives do not. Personally, I think there are enough wall-warts in the world already ;-)


    sh
     
  22. Howard Kaikow

    Howard Kaikow Registered Member

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    Yes..
     
  23. thebigdintx

    thebigdintx Registered Member

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    i've found the most cost effective and easiest way is to use a 3.5" drive placed inside an external usb enclosure. the 3.5" drives are cheaper than the 2.5" laptop drives. once you have purchased the drive enclosure, then if the drive in it ever fails, you can just buy another 3.5" drive, and re-use the enclosure. i keep the external drive off, and turn it on every few days just to create a disk image to it, then turn it off again.
     
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