Doesn't the system restore function do this already?

Discussion in 'FirstDefense-ISR Forum' started by ejr, Jun 20, 2006.

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  1. ejr

    ejr Registered Member

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    This may just show my ignorance, but what is the advantage of using this software versus the built in System restore point in XP?
     
  2. crofttk

    crofttk Registered Member

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    Oh, lordy, where to start ?

    I think I'll just kick back and let one of the other FD-ISR fans give you the lowdown.:p
     
  3. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    I agree Oh lordy.

    Let see.

    Ejr

    Your system is trashed, you can't even get to safe mode or where you can select system restore. Ever see the message file ntloader(or what that file is) can't be found. Not a problem for FDISR

    You want to uninstall all your security software and test a new security suite. Then when your done, you want your system back exactly like it was before you started. System restore can't do this, but FDISR can.

    I could go on, but are you starting to get the picture.

    Pete
     
  4. JRCATES

    JRCATES Registered Member

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    Hey Pete.....this brings up a question I have regarding First Defense - ISR. Once you've created a "Snapshot"....and then encounter something that causes you to want to "load" or use that snapshot.....won't any programs you have installed SINCE THEN (as well as all of the anti-virus, anti-spyware definitions, etc.) be null and void? Or does FDISR have some way of keeping program/defintions updates or upgrades....as well as other programs you may want to keep since the Snapshot was taken? Or do you basically have to "create" a NEW snapshot every time a program is updated, or a new one added that you want to keep?

    Hope that makes sense.....
     
  5. tobacco

    tobacco Frequent Poster

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    Here's my view of XP's system restore.Worked once, failed me 3 times.Nuff said!.
     
  6. crofttk

    crofttk Registered Member

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    That's an emphatic NO ! You merely update/refresh your other snapshot (the secondary, or any other snapshot or archive).

    Any source snapshot additions are added to the target snapshot and any source deletions are deleted from the target.

    Because updates are so quick, I actually update an archive snapshot on my laptop from my primary every hour during the business workday.

    Creating or copying a snapshot completely is the lengthiest FD-ISR operation but updates are a snap unless you've had extensive changes. You MIGHT compare an update to an incremental "backup" except it's incorporated into the full "backup". However, I would caution you against using the word "backup" around FD-ISR fans :ouch: since that word WAY understates FD-ISR's versatile capabilities.
     
  7. ejr

    ejr Registered Member

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    Why can't system restore do this? Before you uninstall your secuity suite...create a restore point. Then uninstall, install the new software. test it. Then restore. Isn't thjat how system restore works?

    In any case, I'm not saying that this product isn't better than system restore. Just not certain that you last example was a valid reason why.

    Of course, I've never used system restore. Am I correct in my understanding of how it works?
     
  8. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    Hi Ejr

    From the XP help stuff:

    System Restore does not replace the process of uninstalling a program. To completely remove the files installed by a program, you must remove the program using Add or Remove Programs in Control Panel or the program's own uninstall program. To open Add or Remove Programs, click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.

    When you use FDISR to "refresh" a snapshot you have been playing in all trace of what you are doing is gone.

    For example. I run KAV,Outpost, and some other stuff like OA, SSM etc. When I wanted to evaluate Norton's Suite for a comparison, I booted to my secondary snapshot, and uninstalled KAV,Outpost, and all my other stuff, and then installed Norton's Suite. Norton stuff can be tough to get rid off. So I just booted back to my primary, and did a refresh of my secondary. It is now exactly like my primary, and any trace of what I did is gone, like it never happened.

    I'd be curious how many people that rely on System Restore would try this test. Run a registry cleaner and while it is cleaning, hit the power reset. I had one freeze and had to power reset. Did a dandy trash job on my system. Just booted to my secondary snapshot and it was fixed in 5 minutes.

    You are right, though you can potentially lose stuff. That is why I do a refresh of my secondary snapshot at least once a day, and if I am going to install anything, I refresh before doing it. That way if all goes to hell in a hand basket, I am covered.

    Pete
     
  9. WSFuser

    WSFuser Registered Member

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    system restore doesnt restore files except maybe system ones. it mostly focuses on restoring registry entires iirc.
     
  10. wilbertnl

    wilbertnl Registered Member

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    You need a live example to understand the advantage of FD-ISR:

    1. Install FD-ISR.
    2. create a second snapshot by copy/update from your primary.

    Now the test starts:
    3. create a Windows restore point.
    4. delete the C:\Programs Files folder, including all subfolders.
    5. delete C:\Winows\system32, including all subfolders.

    Check the results of the test:
    6. Reboot.
    7. See how fast you get this working again with Windows System Restore.
    8. See how fast you are up and running by booting in the copy of the FD-ISR snapshot.

    Don't worry, FD-ISR is going to safe you from the here created disaster.

    And share with us your experience!
     
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