Does nod32 detect yapbrowser?

Discussion in 'NOD32 version 2 Forum' started by webyourbusiness, Feb 11, 2007.

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  1. webyourbusiness

    webyourbusiness Registered Member

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  2. danieleb

    danieleb Registered Member

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    I don't mean to be rude, but wouldn't it be a better idea not to install Yapbrowser in the first place? An anti virus is a good "backup", but so is the users judgment. An anti virus cannot replace this. :)

     
  3. ASpace

    ASpace Guest

    I personally have no idea if you can install this Yapbrowser without Zango (and if this "browser" is not malicious itself) but ->
    NOD32 does detect and removed Zango + variants . I personally have done this plenty of time and NOD performed great . If installed afterwards , NOD should pop-up with alert that mal files are loaded in memory , load the on-demand scanner and delete these infected (dll mostly) files after reboot . Since the on-demand scanner detects these , AMON should also detect them and prevent you from installing the malicious "browser" or its bundled adware :thumb:
     
  4. webyourbusiness

    webyourbusiness Registered Member

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    danieleb,

    talk about stating the obvious - of course it's best not to install the browser - but it's bundled with something that is commonly found on machines some of us run across in our cleaning of infestations.

    Of course, I am not going to be installing YapBrowser any time soon - I want to be sure that this kind of trojan-like behavior is included in the detection of EITHER:

    Adware/Spyware/Riskware

    or

    Potentially Dangerous Applications

    or preferably by signature as a general threat

    I'd like to know if NOD32 detects it, if so, what category it's classified as - because detection of these categories can be turned off by the end-user.

    We all know that good judgement is a fine thing - while we're at it, how about pointing out that hind-sight is a wonderful thing?

    I merely make the point because the article I linked to spells it out - there is a EULA, it's a download that requires some kind of "informed consent" - yet the application does something that I am going to assume that most people would not expect - and that is something that COULD have legal implication, at least here in the USA.

    Even agreeing to adware funded applications doesn't imply you want to view kiddy porn - so the question I think I asked is really rather valid... why would you expect to get child porn along with ads for online gambling and gaming sites?

    I know many of the machines I've cleaned had a LOT of adware - some users just don't get that this kind of thing really is on the margin - Zango just pushed themselves WELL PAST the point of annoying ads into a whole new territory - and that's not something you could expect every user to be aware of.

    hth

    Greg
     
  5. ASpace

    ASpace Guest

    Greg , this Yep browser can be downloaded from
    freedownloadscenter.com and from
    www.freedownloadscenter.com/Network_and_Internet/Misc__Web_Browser_Tools/Yep.html
    (pls , do not open them)

    and it is a site that spreads lots of malicious stuff
    http://pandaman.my.contact.bg/sitesamc.PNG

    About the categories , an end user should have them both enabled . I can't remember how exactly is Zango categorized by ESET , may be the Support knows .
     
  6. webyourbusiness

    webyourbusiness Registered Member

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    thx for the info hitech_boy!
     
  7. ASpace

    ASpace Guest

    You are most welcome , Greg :thumb:
     
  8. lodore

    lodore Registered Member

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    omg that is Sick!
    lodore
     
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