Do you know a good USB-Stick brand/model that has few failures?

Discussion in 'hardware' started by __Nikopol, Dec 3, 2018.

  1. __Nikopol

    __Nikopol Registered Member

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    Hi

    I need some sticks and so I was wondering if you guys, who are administrators in offices and such, have an advice on what to buy. You probably have extensive experience with how certain USB sticks perform and may even be responsible for providing the whole company with quality sticks.

    Please share your secrets with me/us! :)
     
  2. Firecat

    Firecat Registered Member

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    Kingston. They're not the fastest for the price, and they don't usually have metallic builds and glitzy compact shapes - but by far, their USB sticks have survived a ton of use and abuse over the years for me.

    SanDisk is fine too for the reliability factor, but I have observed the performance roll off quickly over time. The only other brand I would recommend is PNY/HP (they are both the same most of the time).

    In India, we give out MoserBaer sticks when we need something on mega cheap, but those sticks usually have all failed within 5 years.
     
  3. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    I think one of the common misuses of such USB devices is to store important files on them. These devices are not meant for archival purposes. They are primarily used for the "temporary" storage of "copies" of files that need to be physically transported to a different site. For example, to take a copy of a file from home to work or school.

    I have seen such devices stop working after zapped by static. I have seen them accidentally stepped on. And I am aware of several getting lost or stolen. Because these are handled by humans, I am aware of two that were chewed up by pet dogs, along with a pair of eyeglasses. And I heard of another that was dropped in a urinal currently being used. :sick:
     
  4. Infected

    Infected Registered Member

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    I have a Kanguru USB. It has a lock switch. Very nice, has never failed on me.

    Code:
    https://www.kanguru.com/storage-accessories/flash-drives.shtml
     
  5. __Nikopol

    __Nikopol Registered Member

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    I've heard about one of those stories where a guy accidentally lost his usb stick in a parking lot or motorway roadhouse lot thing, came back a couple years later and accidentally found it again. It was still working despite rain and mud and stuff. I think I remember pictures of it.
     
  6. trott3r

    trott3r Registered Member

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    Only one to die on me was a datastore stick.

    I tend to buy on design nowadays like the pny metal one seems to act like a heat sink with a good locking mechanism to attached to my keys.
     
  7. reasonablePrivacy

    reasonablePrivacy Registered Member

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    I think that sensitive, important files should be shared by internal, private network infrastructure of company.

    If you use Linux you can try F2FS filesystem (filesystem designed by Samsung for Flash-based storage) to increase lifetime of a USB flash drive, but you won't be able to read files from Windows machines :/
     
  8. __Nikopol

    __Nikopol Registered Member

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    Nah, it's just for boot mediums or interchanging between computers. I don't even need a big one. 8 or 16 GB are good enough.

    Thanks for all the answers so far! :) Sounds like Kingston wins my money. However, are all Kingston sticks MADE by Kingston? Or are there some that are just rebranded because Kingston wanted to save some money? You know, stuff you hear about from time to time
     
  9. Firecat

    Firecat Registered Member

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    Thing with USB sticks is that there are 3 aspects to it: the actual memory (the "storage"), the controller (the part that manages the electronics and interfaces with the computer), and the build quality with all the housing and mechanical parts etc. The memory is made by few well known companies like Intel, Micron, Hynix, Toshiba etc. and the controller is usually from Intel, Phison, 3S Systems or SanDisk/Toshiba.

    All of the USB stick manufacturers are buying the memory and controller from the above companies and then building the housing/parts themselves. Now the main difference comes down to build quality and testing - for example, Kingston generally tests much more rigorously than many smaller brands - given they actually run a separate division for validation and contracted testing of memory products. Kingston tends to prefer Hynix memory compared to many other brands (e.g. Sony, SanDisk) that tend to gravitate towards Toshiba memory (said to be slightly less reliable due to some technology difference).

    So, Kingston USB sticks are made and designed by Kingston - they are not rebrands, but they do use the memory and controller from other manufacturers. The thing with Kingston is they've always assembled parts bought from other suppliers but have always been consistent and rigorous when it comes to quality control.

    I may not have thought of this as a big deal ten years ago, but I have had a lot of flash drives over the last 11 years and the only ones to withstand abuse and still run at near optimal efficiency are Kingston and PNY/HP (95% of the time, HP USB sticks are PNY rebrands). SanDisk too still runs but over long term, not nearly as good as when it was new.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2018
  10. __Nikopol

    __Nikopol Registered Member

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    Ah, thank you! That is what I wanted to know :)
     
  11. xxJackxx

    xxJackxx Registered Member

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    I've never had any brand fail. I've got a PNY and a Buffalo (still the fastest one I have ever used) that are 12 years old each and still working.
     
  12. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    I cannot recall any of my own devices failing either. But I am careful how I handle them after a friend zapped his with static after just pulling it out of his pocket!

    Generally, mine have been retired because I got a higher capacity model.

    Looking in my little box of flash drives, I have one that is as big as a Bic cigarette lighter that has a whopping capacity of 64Mb. I suspect at that time, 64MB was probably thought to be "more than I will ever need!" :rolleyes:
     
  13. xxJackxx

    xxJackxx Registered Member

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    I know someone that fried an entire computer with static. It was just a paperweight after that. I leave the caps on my USB sticks, It seems to help.
     
  14. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    I've seen several. When I was stationed in Phoenix and Albuquerque, it got so dry, you could zap yourself just by squirming in your chair. We kept spray bottles filtered water mixed with 1 teaspoon of fabric softener that we would regularly spray on the carpet to keep static at bay.

    Routine training of personnel included reminders to reach for Earth grounding points before reaching inside equipment, or connector contacts, etc.
     
  15. shmu26

    shmu26 Registered Member

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    The USB sticks you don't want to rely on are the ones they give out for free. They don't last.
     
  16. __Nikopol

    __Nikopol Registered Member

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    I have read the amazon reviews off the Kingston sticks under 20 €. Doesn't sound very good. All very slow despite USB 3.0 and moderate failrate. The best one I found under 20 € has 16-22 MB/s write speed. That's 8 € for 16 GB: DataTraveler SE9 G2
    That's USB 2.0 speed. :(

    I don't even need 16 GB, 8 would be enough but there is no good 8 GB available. It's just a boot medium for live OSs. (Yes, maybe it doesn't need to have a fast write speed, but still)
     
  17. longshots

    longshots Registered Member

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    Yes, but we are in an age of demand, and the "good" USB suppliers don't supply 8Gb sticks anymore.
    I endorse the use of Kingston DataTraveler USB's - am currently using G3's and they're great. They are a slide unit [no lid to lose] and not over width so they can be used alongside other inputs in hardware that has regulation spacing.
    Along with Corsair they don't heat up to ridiculous temperatures after prolonged use.
    I also have the need to use a "secure" USB - from impact, shock and water. For this I use the Corsair Flash Survivor Stealth Drive 256Gb - we all drive the "car" that suits our needs.
    I rate Corsair USB's alongside Kingston as the best to use.
     
  18. __Nikopol

    __Nikopol Registered Member

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    Well, Kingston and everyone else still has 8 GB models.
    I realized more space equals faster storage. I found two other sticks that seem better to me: Transcend JetDrive 790K with 32 GB and relatively high speeds for 7€ each. Or Intenso Premium Line 32 GB also good speeds for 9€

    I hesitate to buy Kingston because the reviews are bad, speed is slow and space is less in comparison. Did they change device manufacturer or what happened here?
     
  19. Firecat

    Firecat Registered Member

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    1) Sticks with more capacity are generally better for speed. This is because many manufacturers will use defective memory in lower capacity drive (I. E. For example, 16GB NAND memory in which many cells are defective will be repurposed as 8GB provided it passes the tests). While this is a way for manufacturers to save profits, it also means less reliability over long term and poorer speeds.

    2) I have already stated that Kingston is not the best speed at the price and that other brands are likely to do better speed wise.

    3) Space might be less due to a variety of reasons including file system and reservation of some memory blocks for wear leveling. This is a method used to reserve some memory to reuse in the event that the controller finds some memory cells bad over several years of use. Generally I have seen SanDisk and Toshiba give the lowest free space, and wear leveling mechanism is a trade secret for any brand.

    As for Kingston, they use memory controllers from various brands, so a drive I buy may have different free space reported from yours, even if they have the same colour and model number etc.

    I would not worry too much about reviews, Kingston by far is a leader in the market for reliability and that reputation is earned, not bought.

    4) Transcend is basically the Asian equivalent of (USA based) Kingston, though they tend to favour performance over reliability. But Transcend products have been rock solid and reliable for me - it's just that they usually cost higher than Kingston, and so when making the choice I usually end up with Kingston instead. :)

    You can get transcend, it won't disappoint.
     
  20. __Nikopol

    __Nikopol Registered Member

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    Interesting. I didn't know that about low capacity sticks. I think I get the Transcent one. It compares better to all Kingston I see in Amazon because it's faster and bigger at the same price. This is germany, so your experience may vary

    EDIT: Yes, I bought two transcent ones. I would've liked Kingston too, but not when the speed is so low. That is very bad. I generally expected more speed from 3.0 or 3.1 devices.

    What is the reason they are still as slow as 2.0?
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018
  21. Hiltihome

    Hiltihome Registered Member

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  22. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

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    USA still the best. But getting worse!
  23. __Nikopol

    __Nikopol Registered Member

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    It looks good, but the reviews make it sound like you need to DIY a little more stability and ruggedness into it, using glue and solder. The tube however could probably be used for many different sticks. If this thing would have been as well-made as it looks, you could drop it from any height. I think I could make it survive any height if I had one.
    Why do manufacturer always half-ass their products?
     
  24. Circuit

    Circuit Registered Member

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    We now live in a throw-away society.:(

    "Term describes a critical view of over-consumption and excessive production of short-lived or disposable items over durable goods that can be repaired.
     
  25. __Nikopol

    __Nikopol Registered Member

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    I guess it will only change after we had the third or fourth global market crash due to either global warming, oil scarcity or both. I wonder how we will make our money then.
     
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