Do i need an AV on my Phone?

Discussion in 'mobile device security' started by hdwydgw534, Nov 15, 2016.

?

Do you use an AV on my Phone?

  1. Yes

    62.0%
  2. No

    38.0%
  1. guest

    guest Guest

    from my understanding, experience and point of view:

    1- non-rooted/jailbreaked device: you don't really need since you don't have full access to the OS , however you should be careful with what apps you install (do your research) , what access they request, etc...

    2- Rooted/jailbreaked device: Now you really need an AV, by rooting it, you just gave full access to the core of the OS, a malicious app could compromise the functioning and all datas of your device.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 15, 2016
  2. entropism

    entropism Registered Member

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    That's not how it works. Assuming you're using Android here - if you stick to the Google Play Store, don't download dumb stuff from there (Like say, https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ScaryFakeCall) and stick to reputable apps? You're fine. Also, check permissions on apps you DO download, to make sure it's relevant. A flashlight app doesn't need access to your call logs and internet, but it DOES need access to your camera (for the flash). Oh, and stay away from Cheetah Mobile. Long known as basically malware themselves in the Android community, despite being a snake oil "security" company.

    If you're rooted? Apps will ask your permission for root access. Same rules as above, but If you don't recognize it, don't grant access. Simple. If an app doesn't NEED root (and few truly do), then it has no reason to have that access, and you should probably reconsider WHY it's asking.

    That being said? Don't root unless you know what you're doing. Know WHY you're doing it. Figure out if you can do it without root (most stuff can).

    I have lifetime license to Zemana's mobile solution, so I have that on my phone simply because it doesn't affect it at all. I've never seen it catch anything, I doubt I ever WILL see it catch anything.
     
  3. guest

    guest Guest

    Tell that to average Joes, they want those dumb stuff...

    you don't know what stuff the supposed to be "legit" apps may do, granting root access is allowing everything.

    root = removing bloat apps from the vendor, installing a ROM, fully using some apps (firewall, backup, deep cleaners, etc... ). Avergae Joe shouldn't root, anyway they won't know how to do it ^^

    same here, mostly i'm using its other features.
     
  4. fax

    fax Registered Member

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    Yes on Android
    Not really on iOS
    No on Windows Mobile 10
     
  5. daman1

    daman1 Registered Member

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    I have a lifetime license to Zemana and use that on my Galaxy S5, has it caught anything? No will it? Maybe but I guess it can't hurt to have it on there as I see no system impact from it.
     
  6. Martin_C

    Martin_C Registered Member

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    Voted NO since we're running Windows 10 Mobile on all our smartphones here. :thumb:
     
  7. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    I run only apps from App Store and don't have an AV on my iPhone.
     
  8. Azure Phoenix

    Azure Phoenix Registered Member

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    Well, I don't think there are any AV for IPhone.

    https://9to5mac.com/2015/03/19/apple-app-store-antivirus/
    "Apple has seemingly decided to crack down on antivirus and antimalware apps, removing them from the App Store"
     
  9. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    Yes you're right. Those are not classic antiviruses, more like mobile security suits for backups, finding lost phone and similar.
     
  10. Overkill

    Overkill Registered Member

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    Seriously? I have been using there apps forever with no issues
     
  11. chrisretusn

    chrisretusn Registered Member

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    I voted yes. I have a Samsung S7 Edge that comes pre-installed with McAfee VirusScan anti-malware technology from Intel Security.
     
  12. roger_m

    roger_m Registered Member

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    The thread title is do I need an AV on my phone, but the poll is do I use an AV. I voted yes, because while I don't believe I need an antivirus on my phone, I do use one, as my phone came with one preinstalled which can not be removed.

    With Android phones (and tablets) I believe that if you only downloads apps from the Play Store, and also check the permissions they use (as entropism suggested), then there is no need for an antivirus. I've downloaded literally hundreds of apps from the Play Store oer the last few years. I've also used numerous third party app stores and installed plenty of apps manually by downloading and running the apk file, and have also not got infected. The third party app stores often find updates for existing apps and even Google services. Despite all of this (and that face usually all my devices are rooted), I've never got any malware. The worst I've had is some apps which some security software considered to be adware, but nothing acutally harmful.


    Basically, it won't hurt to run an antivirus, as it really shouldn't cause any performance or battery life impact, but you most likely don't need to.
     
  13. bellgamin

    bellgamin Very Frequent Poster

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    Is there something special about Win10Mob that causes you to say that?
     
  14. guest

    guest Guest

    He put an HIPS on it :p (just joking)
     
  15. Martin_C

    Martin_C Registered Member

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    Due to the locked down nature of the OS, I could face 3 things.

    1. A application breaking out of its isolation in the sandbox - never seen it happen on Windows 10 Mobile.

    2. A breach of Edge combined with a breach of the locked down mobile OS - never seen it happen on Windows 10 Mobile.

    3. Somebody hitting me on the head with a big baseball bat and installing a application while I'm unconscious - never heard of it actually happen anywhere.

    So apart from keeping alert about loose baseball bats, I feel rather secure on this OS :thumb:
     
  16. bellgamin

    bellgamin Very Frequent Poster

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    @ Martin . . .
    Sandbox = Good reason!
    "Never seen it happen" = Never look behind you. Someone may be gaining on you. :eek:
     
  17. entropism

    entropism Registered Member

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    The average user here isn't that dumb. People who root generally aren't that dumb


    And that's exactly why I said what I said. Know what you're installing. Know WHY you're installing it. If you root and install, say, Titanium Backup, you can expect it to ask for root permission. If a random process asks, you deny and investigate. Having an AV has nothing to do with this, because nothing will protect against stupid. This isn't an AV concern anyways, it's about knowledge.

    Depending on the phone, you don't need root to debloat. You also don't need "deep cleaners" either, rooted or not. Again, this isn't an argument for AVs, it's an argument about knowing what you're messing with.

    Hell, even backup programs are relatively unneccessary with how Google backs up data these days.

    Firewalls are highly unneccessary as well, and what average user, who doesn't know to deny unknown root access, is using a firewall?

    At this point you're making up hypothetical situations for your argument that you'll never see in the real world.

    Again, simple answer, to the original question - If you're going to root, learn about rooting. You 100% do NOT need an AV if you're actually going to use common sense before granting root access, or installing obvious crapware.
     
  18. Trooper

    Trooper Registered Member

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    I have an iPhone 7 and a Google Pixel XL. I do not use AV on either one.
     
  19. Tarnak

    Tarnak Registered Member

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    Zemana Mobile and Malwarebytes Mobile
     
  20. guest

    guest Guest

    Average Joe is very dumb , sorry to say that , that the plain truth. unless the apps has "virus" in his name , if it is what they look for, they will install it whatever you say. If they were smart, AV vendors and the business i had would never exist.

    People who root are not forcibly the one using the rooted phone, many shop where i live (in Asia) root/jailbreak phones for a small fees.

    come on...this is the practice people should follow but now how many users will do that...if they did , this forum would never exist...

    Good for you if you live in a country where phones are not bloated , but in many like mine, i had to remove lot of it (more than 20 in some cases) ,and they are deeply installed , no root = no debloat possible.
    Not saying for Samsung phone , there is a lot of job to do with all he crap they use to put.

    on this point i agree , i never backup apps; just datas.

    Personally i like to know what is going out , lot of weaponized "seems-to-be-the-legit" apps are just plain keylogger/RAT.

    So you live in a dream world, that is good for you, but i saw too many people with infected phones/PCs that i have to clean/reformat, so i'm just realist.
    Not saying some of my now old acquaintances creating malwares/infected apps and distributing them with success and getting more money with them than me with my job, doing it so easily, i would even considering doing like them.

    Common sense...yes...where is common sense when nobody is aware of a new vector attack or vulnerability. Just look at ransomwares, few years ago nobody heard of them...look at now, all vendors have to add features to prevent them...yes common sense very useful indeed...and that is for "aware" users; i don't even mention about "happy clickers"...

    Don't misundertand me, i don't say your are wrong, what you said should be the basic principles every users should follow but it is not that simple. People are unaware/don't care of the risks (especially on smarphones) and don't realize that until their bank account are compromised and money is missing.

    Personally i use AVs on my phone mostly for the added features than the scanners. Because i (hopefully) know what im doing.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 16, 2016
  21. TheWindBringeth

    TheWindBringeth Registered Member

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    The vast majority of users have a significantly limited ability to "know" what they are installing, what is arriving through an update, what behaviors are built-in, which behaviors are controllable by remote parties, how the behaviors combine to affect security/privacy, etc. Basic due-diligence and thoughtful approach will go far. However, properly knowing the somewhat complex devices, products, and services that exist today requires some expertise. Plus time, which is a problem for most people.

    That's incomplete. While some users would make a harmful decision despite an AV or similar warning, some other users would heed the warning. Plus, depending on the scenario, the user in question might not even have the privilege/knowledge required to be able to work around such a feature.

    Inspecting and controlling traffic is one thing that security/privacy oriented users do that others don't. Savvy ones recognize that app traffic can be mixed (some good, some bad) and OS/platform traffic also requires attention. There are some tools which can help ordinary users do this. So even those who don't understand protocols and so forth can achieve some protection in this area.
     
  22. xxJackxx

    xxJackxx Registered Member

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    Nope.Nothing to add to what has already been said.
     
  23. entropism

    entropism Registered Member

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    Again, your reading comprehension... I said the average person HERE. As in this forum. The average person in general is dumber than a bag of wet hammers.

    The average Samsung phone can be debloated in about 5 minutes, WITHOUT root, no matter what country you're in. it's called a Package Disabler, and you can find a variety of them on the Play store. Again, you're wrong.

    Modern apps have an API that can back up the app AND data. If you're not using updated apps, I can't help you.


    So check the permissions. If it's a keylogger, it would give you a clue in the permissions. Like I said, it doesn't require an AV.


    I live in a dream world because you don't know how the Android permission system works? It boils down to this: Don't download POS apps. If you're downloading malware infected crap, not a damn thing can help you.

    A PC is not an Android device. You would need elevated privledges and actually grant the permission. So yeah, your argument falls flat here.

    We're talking about the statement
    If you're going to root, know what the **** you're doing. Simple. The majority of people who know how to root or have a basic understanding of what they're doing, haveat least have SOME understanding of what's going on.

    Not really. If you're putting yourself in a position of vulnerability, AND you're installing crapware on purpose (hacked apps, cheats, etc) AND you have very little knowledge about what an AV is warning you about? You're going to click "allow". Because "The AV is probably warning me that the app is hacked. I KNOW the app is hacked, that's why I'm installing it!".

    Outbreaks of malware occur primarily in poor areas of the world and in places the Play store isn't allowed, because they're using repositories filled with "cracked" apps and 3rd party app stores. Trust me, if people didn't want to cheat the system, and got their software from verified places (APKMirror, if the Play store isn't available) this wouldn't be nearl as big an issue.[/QUOTE]


    Riiiiiiight? Like I said, if the person is savvy enough to root, and cares enough about app traffic, then they're going to know what they're doing, for the most part. They're also going to know not to install crapware. At the very least, they're going to be skeptical when "Random Flashlight App" asks for total system privledges and root access. So yeah, like I said... A firewall for novices is going to be few and far between.

    This is the perfect example of what I brought up to guest:

    You're giving an example of a user who has no idea about root, but is rooted anyways because he wants to use a firewall, cares enough about his internet traffic to install a firewall app, and THEN has no idea how to use a firewall. It's a stretch beyond stretches.
     
  24. TheWindBringeth

    TheWindBringeth Registered Member

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    Actually, my comments assumed nothing about whether or not the device was rooted. I was attempting to add color to some areas I felt needed it. I think you are viewing things in a binary like fashion. Where someone who roots is either a) so knowledgeable and attentive that they can't benefit from AV like tools, or b) so clueless and careless that they will always sabotage themselves by ignoring/overriding such tools. I think there are many people who fall in between those two extremes. I also happen to view AV like tools as an aid rather than a crutch, but I'm not sure that matters.

    Knowing how to use a firewall like component (or a permission control system, etc) isn't the same as knowing what should/shouldn't be allowed. Sometimes it is rather obvious that something is an unnecessary potential threat and should be blocked. Sometimes it is not, and making the correct call may require careful analysis [each and every time software changes]. Maybe I'm interpreting "AV" differently and more broadly than you, but here I've considered it to be: a tool which leverages knowledge/analysis of others and can help someone identify and respond to a threat. So I include a firewall/webfilter component that can utilize rules created by others. Something I think most phone, other app platform, and web browser users should seriously consider.
     
  25. guest

    guest Guest

    Geek users here at not the only users, it is a forum for all kind of users; when i talk about something i include Mr Dumb to Mr super-genius.

    About rooting, 99% percent of the users who want roots is because they need some apps/performance tweaks they read somewhere or to get rid of some bloat from their device (as i wanted when i acquired my first smartphone, however i did tons of researches to be able to tweak it safely). some Average Joe just want root, they don't care of the rest.

    You seems to assume everybody has our knowledge and so-called "common sense" , which is not and will never happen.

    Btw, i know well enough about Android, so don't insinuate i don't know what i'm talking about. I tweaked my Phone OS enough to unlock its limitations with tools that ALL need root access.
    I(and surely you too) have lurked long enough on XDA but how many did ? 0.01% of the Android users.

    i remind you the topic is "do (any kind) of users need an AV?"
     
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