Deep Freeze Experiences

Discussion in 'other security issues & news' started by LockBox, Dec 29, 2004.

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  1. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    I am currently working on a security-related article that focuses on the Faronics software program Deep Freeze. I'll be posting it here at Wilders as well and would like to include some experiences from members. The article will show how Deep Freeze (hang on!) renders almost all third party security tools obsolete. It is as close to fool-proof security as there is. Unfortunately, it is only now getting attention as computer security software as it was initially developed for use on school and library computers to protect their systems.

    Many people who raise this issue find out real quick that many don't like the Deep Freeze solution as it ruins all the fun of messing around with security tools. I even read here on Wilders not too long ago of someone who had been vilified for daring to suggest that Deep Freeze virtually eliminates all threats to your computer.

    If you have experiences with Deep Freeze (good, bad, indifferent) please either post them here or PM me. Thanks a lot and for those interested, hang on; my article might spoil all the fun. :D


    Gerard
     
  2. Bubba

    Bubba Updates Team

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    Last edited: Dec 29, 2004
  3. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    Thank you Bubba! I had read through those already, but it was a good reminder at some of the objections of Deep Freeze. I am reminded of the "It's just for schools" argument against Deep Freeze and like programs (namely ShadowUser). Of course, nothing could be further from the truth. Deep Freeze can be used at home for a personal license cost of only $29.95. When DF was sold last year, they lowered the price from $79.95 to the new lower price in order to encourage interest from the home user. I still think the marketing could be better. ShadowUser does a better job in this area.

    I noticed that one of the arguments (from a developer of security software!) was that you could place too much trust in Deep Freeze and thereby make things worse. Actually, it doesn't really matter what happens: virus, trojan, whatever. A simple reboot, all pests are gone, and you are back to optimal state, and much quicker than an image.

    In "thawed" state (when you can add programs, tweak Windows, update applications, etc.) the threat is nil when you run FreezeX, which disallows the running of any programs and many other files with use of a whitelist that tells FreezeX what is safe to run, rather than what is not. Actually, ironically, (because it was Gavin of DiamondCS that was being critical of Deep Freeze in its "thawed state") running his own Process Guard during those short times offers near-complete protection and is an excellent companion to Deep Freeze.

    As for liking to install and uninstall programs and thinking it wouldn't be good because of that; actually, it's just the opposite. You can install a program anytime Windows is "frozen" and try anything to your hearts content. Like the program? Re-Boot "thawed" and it's yours and part of the freeze next re-boot. Install a nightmare program? Re-boot and it's gone forever, you are back to your "optimal state" in seconds.

    Yes, for ease-of-use, you would want to setup that "optimal system" with all programs installed, etc. ALL data goes on another partition and is unaffected by anything. Once that perfect state is setup, you are as fast as a re-boot from that perfect state each time.

    Again, I need Deep Freeze stories: pro, con, indifferent. I intend to show how Deep Freeze renders third-party security tools absolutely useless. Not even a reason for an anti-virus! I would very much like to use real experiences, so PM them to me or post here. Thank you!!
    Gerard Morentzy
     
  4. nick s

    nick s Registered Member

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    Hi Gerard Morentzy,

    Aren't you contradicting yourself? Why shoud Deep Freeze need any companions to offer "near-complete protection"?

    Nick
     
  5. securityuser

    securityuser Guest

    No he is really not. I have used Deep Freeze and am familiar with it's thawed and frozen states. In a frozen state he's really right. Whatever happens happens and it's no big deal. Reboot and it's a perfect system. When a system is thawed for the short time to update apps or install/uninstall, that is when theoretically something could execute. Process Guard would make a perfect companion as he called it. Freeze X is much like Process Guard and it's sold by the Deep Freeze people to protect during a thawed state. I used Deep Freeze as a system admin for 100-125 workstations and was impressed. I also agree it would work fine for home users. Gerard, I've never heard of Shadowuser is it like Deep Freeze? No need to answer, I'll just google.
     
  6. wilhacku

    wilhacku Guest

    Well what if your hard drive fails? How would the program work then? Anyone? .....that's what I thought.

    What if the program becomes more popular, will hackers figure out a way to disable the program..... or have they already? ;)

    IMO it's still better to backup to an external drive (or dvd) for maximum security.
     
  7. securityuser

    securityuser Guest

    It's not a backup program. We always used Drive Image and imaged our systems, which included Deep Freeze, on the image. Backing up data is not an issue as all data is configured to save to another drive or partition. We only put the C drive in Deep Freeze. As for its popularity, "the Freeze" as many kids call it at schools, is used at thousands of schools all over the world already, it's already very popular and in many corporate environments as well. It's pretty damn stout.

    Gerard, when do you need your testimonies? I can write a good one. I was very impressed with Deep Freeze when I worked with it. I just downloaded the latest version and have been playing with it for an hour or so. They've made some quality improvements that make it even better. I never really thought of it for home use either, but the new $29.95 for a single license changes all that. Used to be like $80.00 and you had to buy at least 5 or something of the sort.
     
  8. Notok

    Notok Registered Member

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    Deep Freeze does seem like a good product, I am interested in hearing some user reports as well... however my interest is from the angle of having lots of people's computers to take care of and not having the time to take care of every problem that arises, and not having to teach someone how to use imaging software. This would be great for setting up someone's machine and not having to worry about it again until the next major service pack comes out. However I would NOT trust this to be the sole line of defense in a security setup. I wouldn't treat this as anything other than another imaging program, in terms of security.

    Yes, it's great to be able to clean the infection with a simple reboot, but by then the damage may already be done. Since this WOULD protect against system corruption, it would mean that the user would probably not need to reboot as often, leaving a greater window of time open for these things to work. If you got something that took over your system, or continually reinfected you, you could be in even more trouble if you relied on this as your sole means of security. As Gavin stated, you would also probably continue to spread email borne malware, keeping you as part of the problem rather than the solution. Malware isn't just a nuisance anymore, some are made to steal your identity and these things are getting nastier all the time... it may only take one login to your online banking or one online purchase for the damage to be done, rebooting won't erase that data from the attacker's machine.

    I have no doubt that this is a great product, and I may even get this for someone like my mom and my most recent client, but you gotta keep things in perspective. Nothing is 100%, and it's dangerous to promote it as such. It may be a fantastic alternative for imaging software, but not security and not backups (as wilhacku stated.) The bottom line is that you still need to prevent infection in the first place.

    That said, can anyone give some insight to using this thing? A few questions that come to my mind are:
    -How much drive space is necessary?
    -Does any part of it run resident? If so, how much resources are require?
    -How much time does it add to Windows start?
    -What is involved in keeping it from deleting your email and downloads and how well does it deal with things like your AV updates. Does it allow for updates while protecting it from being modified otherwise?
    -What about Windows Updates?
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2004
  9. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    Oh boy! I knew I shouldn't have made that first response post as I would get involved in the give and take. My real intention was to lay out my thoughts in the article that I will post here at Wilders after receiving feedback. But, I see that it is probably near impossible to not answer a few questions prior to that.

    Nick....securityuser already answered your question correctly but I will elaborate a bit. I intend to show in my article that Deep Freeze can be run on a home computer and keep one safe while running only one other companion program. The DF people offer FreezeX which is a program based on a whitelist concept that detects close to 100 different executable file types. Keep in mind, this program is protection mostly while the system is in the password-protected "thawed state" which is not very often. This is the state when new programs can be installed, Windows updates applied and other maintenance procedures conducted. The "thawed state" is simply the main drive running as normal without Deep Freeze protection, like most of us run our computers each day. During these thawed times FreezeX will not allow any of the close to 100 executable file types to execute. In fact, it only allows what you have given specific permission to run. That's the whitelist concept. I looked at Process Guard mentioned by a poster and can see the benefit in that program as well as opposed to FreezeX. The difference is the latter has the whitelist protection. FreezeX also would not allow any keyloggers to run at any time - thawed or frozen.

    securityuser...You asked about Shadowuser. It is a good program that is similar to Deep Freeze. There are major differences though that make Deep Freeze a far better security solution. I would like feedback within a couple of weeks. I have written most of my article but wanted to include user experiences and thoughts, specifically from a security viewpoint. Thanks for your offer, it sounds like you have had good luck with the program as a system administrator.

    Notok....You would love Deep Freeze for the computers you must care for. It's most well known for use in these environments.
    This is where the companion program comes in. FreezeX will not allow anything to run on a system that it specifically does not permit. Rather than a blacklist-style signature database type of protection which must be updated, FreezeX is the opposite, it disallows everything unless you have said it's ok to run. No keylogger could execute as it is unknown to FreezeX which is sophisticated and goes by more than just file names.
    I understand your thinking as I thought just as you at one time. One thing - it is not imaging software and it is not a backup utility. It is used everyday by millions for "perfect state on reboot", and in that respect it is like an image. But, it is far more than that. Now, here is where minds start spinning as it sounds so heretical: With the security plan that I will write about you really don't need to prevent infection (!!!). The only real threat is the one you mentioned and that is keyloggers that could steal personal identifying information. I have already addressed that with the companion program (FreezeX) a keylogger cannot run on a whitelisted, frozen, protected Deep Freeze system. As for viruses using email, that is a vulnerability that I will address in the article. Keep in mind that nothing would keep you from running an AV if a person felt more comfortable doing so. Any AV can be run if it is frozen as part of the system.

    Notok, as for your technical questions I would refer you to the Deep Freeze home page at http://www.faronics.com/html/DFStd.asp and an extremely good resource at their FAQ site at http://www.faronics.net/faq/ ...they have sections for general and enterprise use at the faq site, which notice is at faronics.net and not the main site.

    Thank you so far for the feedback and I would love to hear more. With this product you must keep an open mind as it can be a revolutionary product, not to just let kids tinker and then everything is perfect on reboot, but far more than that for the individual home user.

    Gerard Morentzy
     
  10. wilhacku

    wilhacku Guest

    Here's a good read on the program http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,7058164?hilite=deep freeze
    No program is unbeatable and anyone who relies on just this program without much much more research is a nut imo.

    I won't be giving up my regular security apps any time soon, though I've known about DF (and others like Shadowuser, GoBack, Restore it ect..) for some time now, but still would not rely on only DF because it is still possible to beat the program.

    Anyone who thinks this program is the holy grail of security programs should think twice before giving up their more trusted and proven security apps. It may be a useful addition to ones line up, but I simply wouldn't rely on just this program for all my security needs. It still best to rely on more proven techniques and programs before you jump on the DF bandwagon and assume it's the "cure all" of computer security/malware problems.
     
  11. securityuser

    securityuser Guest

    iwillhacku, Deep Freeze is NOT like Go Back. That thread is FULL of misinformation. I have a suspicion you have a reason to be afraid of Deep Freeze and its impact on security product sales. Nothing is 100%. We might both die tonight! Who knows? No such thing as 100% in ANYTHING. The attacks against Deep Freeze would require someone targeting you specifically, getting thru your router, knowing EXACTLY what to do and more. I think your objections are far off base and are based on misreading Gerard's posts. You CAN run anything you want in addition to Deep Freeze though I agree with Gerard that it's probably unnecessary. It just wouldn't be as much fun would it? It would also dent some pocketbooks of those selling apps that would be useless if Deep Freeze or Shadowuser caught on. ehh? To Gerard, I will write something for you and email it to you but I can't get your email as I am not registered. Could you send your email address to secuser54 at yahoo dot com?
     
  12. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    Ahhh...Life is too short to get all upset about something like this.

    I have a New Year's Eve party to attend so I have to make this short.

    I read the old DSL thread and had, in fact, read it and archived it in preparation of my article. Actually, the criticisms were valid in several of those posts. However, most of the messages in that thread were over 2 years old and much has changed. Namely - the addition of FreezeX to the Deep Freeze family. Until FreezeX, it was a legitimate concern about what may happen before reboot. I would encourage you to read about FreezeX and see how it works on the whitelist concept.
    http://www.faronics.com/html/Freezex.asp
    Trojans, Virii, etc. could NOT execute within Deep Freeze with FreezeX running. secrityuser already mentioned that this is not another "Go Back" program.

    It is important to remember that Deep Freeze should only be configured on a pristine Windows XP with all updates, etc. The frozen state should be configured after AV programs are run, AT programs are run, etc. Once that perfect state is configured, with all your programs, it is "frozen." I simply fail to see how the program cannot protect you with DF and FreezeX running. It is my understanding from my communications with the company (Faronics) that there was some consideration to rolling FreezeX into the Deep Freeze program. But, to keep security high, the programs are still separate. No trojans can be executed between boots as FreezeX will not allow their execution.

    As I said, some of the criticisms of DF in that old DSL Reports thread were valid. Deep Freeze now has FreezeX which has quieted the criticism.

    securityuser, I have sent an email to your posted email account. Thanks again for your help in relating your experiences. I look forward to receiving your testimony.

    I have to go ring in 2005. See you....uh....next year!
    Best to all and HAPPY NEW YEAR!

    Gerard Morentzy
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2004
  13. Notok

    Notok Registered Member

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    securityuser: Why not post at least some feedback here so that everyone else here can learn a bit more about using the program?
     
  14. I have nothing but great things to say about Deep Freeze. We use it all over the district and the security is incredible. The kids download anything and everything and upon reboot, it is gone. I have wondered for a long time why they haven't offered this heavily to the home market. We also run with Freeze-X and together I would pit them head to head against anyone with 15 different security programs running. Freeze-X keeps anything and everything from executing when we're in maintenance mode at which time I usually will run several other tools to make sure the 'clean freeze' is nothing put a perfect and secure setup of Windows XP and programs. The kids are allowed to keep data files on (depending on grade) floppy, USB Flash Drives and even on a data-only server with password-enabled folders. I use Deep Freeze at home and it is very simple. Once you get the hang of it, it's a breeze. I like being able to try new programs on the fly and if I don't like it, it's gone on the next reboot with no sign of it ever having been on my system. It's great to try shareware and things I would otherwise be very careful with. I purchased my Deep Freeze home licensed for 29.95 and then Freeze-X for I think about the same price. If you do all maintenance offline, Freeze-X is optional. I feel secure with Deep Freeze and oh, I should tell you, I have had many kids tell me upfront that they have tried hacking the Freeze with no luck. The tricks on the Internet don't work with the latest release and Faronics is quick to fix any problems at all. It's such a simple concept that it seems too good to be true. One of the members wrote in a post above warning that trusting Deep Freeze is nuts. No more so than trusting the tons of software listed in your signature. To the man who started the thread here, feel free to use my testimonial in any way you like and I look forward to reading your article. I have a feeling you will say what I have been saying for a long time. The Freeze could make the dozens and dozens of security tools used to protect systems quaint reminders of what it used to be. Some don't believe it and that's fine, but try it yourself. I just looked and the trial is a full sixty days.
     
  15. willhacku

    willhacku Guest

    First off I would like to say at no time did I say that the program wasn't good, I was just trying to say that I don't trust a program that is not backed by the top computer security experts. I'm not just going to drop all my proven security programs because some guy (sorry, no offense Gerard) (or a website) says you should. It's always better to layer your security apps than to just rely on a single program imo. Because if the program is hacked what do you have then?

    Now, the program has been around for quite some time and most of the computer security forums and security experts are still recommending the AV/AT/AS + firewall route. Now if this program is really so great why isn't everyone raving about it all over the internet? I haven't seen one positive review of the program by any security experts or even many positive sounding posts about the program at any of the major security forums other than here. You would think there would be more positive talk about a program that is as revolutionary and fabulous as your saying DF is.

    Some may say, well all the security experts and security forums are profit driven (or down right paid off to give a certain point of view) and I may agree with you to a certain extent, but there really should and WOULD be more postive feedback for a program that is supposed to be such a fantastic and nearly fool-proof security program.

    So my question is, where are all the reviews saying this program is the end to all the other proven ways to secure your system? I'm looking for trusted expert reviews, not just some persons opinion, who may very well work for Faronics (or being PAID to post a positive review) and just here to push their own product, which is VERY VERY common on this site.
     
  16. Diver

    Diver Guest

    I used a PC in a hotel set up for kiosk browsing with Deep Freeze. Despite many efforts to screw it up, the machine would revert to its config after each reboot. Good for a PC used by kids or for kiosk browsing. Not useful for one's own PC, provided the user has any kind of security awareness.
     
  17. securityuser

    securityuser Guest

    I wish Gerard would come back and answer this. Diver, could you explain why it wouldn't be good for a home user? If it stands up to attempted abuse at hotels, kiosks, schools, libraries and every other place where the kitchen sink is thrown at it, why would it somehow be "not useful" for the home user? This line of reasoning makes no sense to me.
     
  18. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    I think one of the main items that hasn't been brought up is the ability of programs such as ShadowSurfer/ShadowUser or DeepFreeze to protect you against zero-day exploits (you know the ones that your average A/V, A/T or firewall won't protect you from if you're one of the un-lucky first ones hit with something totally new).

    But I also believe it's necessary to stress that you really shouldn't run in either ShadowMode or "Frozen" for long periods of time, for the reasons given above (you could conceivably be running with an infected computer for a long period of time, with all the "infection of others" and "loss of private info" concerns noted).

    IOW, booting should be done at least twice daily.

    I'd also note that Gerard's touting of the "FreezeX" technology (while poo-poo'ing every other form of resident protection and claiming they're all obsolete) results in nothing more than trashing one set of defensive tools (your own) for another - FreezeX. (Quite profitable for the DeepFreeze people, I'm sure).

    FreezeX itself sounds like something you'd have to deal with constantly if you relied on it - and it pre-supposes that whoever the other operators of the computer are will know how to deal with it, also. (I'll take resident protection of the programs that I already have on-board and that other people can't screw with, thank you).

    Not sure anyone's really touched on the fact that if DeepFreeze does catch on wildly in the private sector, it'll certainly come under attack just like any other defensive program. Exploits will be found, especially if the program is weak at any point during the switch from "Frozen" to "Un-Frozen".

    I've never used DeepFreeze, but glancing at the literature, it seems a lot more difficult to set-up and use - and it sounds like you have to deal with FreezeX constantly (although I may be wrong).

    I use and like ShadowUser (although ShadowSurfer's just as good for the average user) and both of those programs are a lot simpler to deal with.

    Just my .02 Pete
     
  19. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    I will wait to address the home user vs. schools and libraries user discussion until my article, suffice to say the argument is full of contradictions.

    I did want to mention that I in no way have anything to do with Faronics. I am hoping maybe someone with that company might come here and offer some thoughts. That kind of accusation gets old on forums when someone finds benefits from a program and has good things to say about it.

    Pete, I agree about zero day exploits. Thanks for bringing this up. Deep Freeze, btw, isn't really any harder at all than ShadowUser. Though I would argue the same basic premise for both products. Also Pete, the only reason I mentioned FreezeX is that it is the sole program I know of that works on a 100% whitelist principle. I mentioned Process Guard in one of my posts and said that could be used instead of FreezeX. Considering the unique nature of the product, I don't consider it "trashing" other products to mention FreezeX as a "safety net" program to go along with DF. Saying it could render the others obsolete is a bold statement, I admit, but is not "trashing" any other product. For example, electric lightbulbs rendered kerosene lamps for home use obsolete. That's not "trashing" kerosene lamps, but only noting the progress of new technology. Likewise with this software. And no, I am not comparing DF to the light bulb, only the context in which I wrote! I don't have a dog in the hunt, other than believing that DF can be one of the most effective programs a security-minded user can have. And yes, Pete, I do believe that spending hundreds of dollars on multiple "security programs" could be rendered obsolete by the use of Deep Freeze and other like technology. So called "layered protection" sounds good, but talk about "lining pockets!!", that's what many of these programs do for their makers, even though they would be totally unnecessary if running Deep Freeze. Like I said in a post above, I will address the "all eggs in one basket" argument in my article.

    I appreciate all of the feedback. It helps to hear the pros, cons, and questions from some who do not know of Deep Freeze.

    Thanks again,
    Gerard Morentzy
     
  20. nick s

    nick s Registered Member

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    Hi Gerard Morentzy,

    I see in the FreezeX FAQ that Faronics recommends the use of an AV: Do I need FreezeX if I have an antivirus program?. I also see that SanDiegoSchools (post #14) refers to the use of "tools" to verify a "secure setup" before freezing. What do you consider necessary to ensure that you are not "freezing" a compromised system? If you freeze a compromised system, are there any other rescue options available besides relying on the use of imaging software?

    Nick
     
  21. lynchknot

    lynchknot Registered Member

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    What do you guys think of Winrollback?
     
  22. Re: "I hacked deep freeze and won $500!"

    Not really. Have you?

    Here's how someone might set up Deep Freeze for XP:

    After 35 passes with DBAN, create 3 partitions: format C, D, E drives with fat32. Next install an nLite version of the devils own, and configure Windows appearance to preference. After using WWDC and XPantichrist come machine-specific registry mods, then disable remaining services. Next install few essential programs, among them software firewall and other than "blue-e" to surf with. Now is time to configure those programs that allow to backup files to D drive. After that a person mite create an internet connection but NOT yet connect to the internet. Finally, its possible to place the DF installation executable in My Documents folder and defrag the C drive. You could even use Drive Image 5 to create the Image of C drive, which could be saved to D drive (for later "burning" to CD/DVD). Shutdown Restart, install DF Standard Edition choosing to "freeze" drive C ONLY, leaving drives D,-n- E "thawed".

    Seen not to rely "solely' on Deep Freeze. One weakness in that approach mite be *potential* viral licking of secret files on "thawed" drive(s) to temporary reinfect the C drive when accessed. Certain approach to this concern is 1. save projects+reboot before connecting to internet (mabeeeeeee,eeeeeee,wheeeeeeee,wheeeee same procedure for demo software: reboot before connecting to internet).2. attach+ZorIt all "thawed" everything to existing large mb files too big for sublime upload.

    Correct? Spyware lifespan on Deep Freeze protected computer would be duration of each surf session till reboot. In other words nternet Explorer welcomes spyware into your computer but deep freeze gets rid of it not until you restart.


    Experience:
    ___________


    "Deep Freeze protects newbies from snafu!"

    I surf wherever i want download whatever i want open whatever i want. It don't matter. Sometimes i show off and delete Windows folder like for fun!


    "Deep Freeze is fun for entire family!"

    No more objection to spyware games on My Computer, but play offline. And turn it off when you're done. Thanks. F'n great to not hear hard feelings and everyone smiles! My guests, please surf drive-thru resources. Yes.


    "Deep Freeze stops threats from where sites!"

    One time generated #'s with a program found on a internet. Run program wrote # then Shutown/Restart (remove program traces) shift_ctrl_alt_f6 enter password, boot thawed next time. Enter #, Restart frozen.


    "Deep Freeze maintains user privacy!"

    "This one guy i used to know was surfing porn on somebody elses computer and they come in so i just restarted and all traces was gone."


    "Deep Freeze prevents anxiety!"

    Suspect that last outgoing packet? Reboot.


    "Deep Freeze dramatically extends many program trial period!"

    "I saved thousands in software purchases over the last 24 months. Thanks Deep Freeze!"


    "Deep Freeze inhibits the growth of government information databases"

    Big brother spyware wont stick if you have Deep Freeze on your computer first. Using Deep Freeze guarantees the expense of skilled forensic examiners.


    0ther:
    _____________

    Today, i drove MicrosoftAntiSpywareInstall.exe. It found 0. Yet another stillborn software due to superior concept of Deep Freeze. Imagine MS resources on Deep Freeze/ShadowUser foundation! Something new on machines? Yes!

    Hey!

    Deep Freeze+software Firewall+Ssm or ProcessGuard or Abtusion Protector

    Backup program+Integrity Checker Utility to verify all content @ startup.

    Don't use Outlook E-Mail or nternet Explorer unless forced! This gets security level high.

    Anti virus, Anti trojan, Anti Spyware, Privacy cleaners, Maintenance tools: obsolete.
     
  23. surfdom

    surfdom Guest

    It's obsolete.

    j/k
     
  24. top2T

    top2T Guest


    I agree, and a point that should not be overlooked. I would think the same thing should also apply to FreezeX. A good move perhaps would be to keep some (or all) of your regular security programs for a back up if you do decide to use DeepFreeze/FreezeX. Many of these programs are free anyway and if they aren't you can usually find free versions of firewalls/antivirus/antispyware that you could use as a backup along with DeepFreeze. It really couldn't hurt to have these programs for a backup plan that you may wish you had down the road if new ways are found to beat the programs.
     
  25. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    MagicLanternTM - I realize that your post was tongue-in-cheek, but let's not give people the wrong impression, okay?

    To the best of my (admittedly limited) knowledge, both DeepFreeze and the "Shadow" programs simply allocate and then utilise an unused section of your HD's free-space to create a virtual volume - but neither program is simply running in RAM. (Oh, would that they were!)

    When you either "UNFreeze" or come out of ShadowMode, as the case may be, all that happens is that the information on the section of the HD that was being used is deleted - not erased.

    Unless you run an erasing program's "Free Space" wipe after coming back into regular operating mode, all the info contained in your session is still recoverable, forensically...

    Nor can you delete your actual Windows folder - the copy running in the virtual volume - maybe (haven't tried it, myself).

    Anyway, it's good to see some humor about the subject. Pete
     
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