Debloat 8.1

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by Overkill, Mar 22, 2021.

  1. Overkill

    Overkill Registered Member

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    I decided to dual boot 8.1 with Linux Mint, and it's running so nice on my laptop compared to win 10...36 process's compared to over 100 in win 10...does the win 10 debloaters work on 8.1?
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2021
  2. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    I agree, Windows 8.1 is great. Don't know about debloaters, they should probably state that on their sites.
    Though when counting processes there was also a change how services run under Windows 10. On Windows 8.1 one svchost.exe could be used for many services, on Windows 10 each service has it's own svchost instance. That's probably one of security improvements to separate services like that.
     
  3. reasonablePrivacy

    reasonablePrivacy Registered Member

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    Yes, it is.
     
  4. EASTER

    EASTER Registered Member

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    I recently purchased a new Dell with Windows 10 Home and proceeded to NOT debloat but carefully unhinge only a few resource/memory taxing objects.

    As seemingly stable as Windows 10 is, plus the better AV tie in that doesn't bog down like before, my 8.1 systems are incredibly more responsive in comparison from my point of view. Funny thing too is that the more zippy 8.1 O/S is running on depreciated/limited hardware than Windows 10 and still is fast as lightning.

    Of course it required many months to fine tune it to the point where it's exceptional in comparison.

    My take is that, if and only if, Microsoft would do away with all the bandwidth energy draining Telemetry from Windows 10, that system would take off like a hypersonic!
     
  5. johndoa

    johndoa Registered Member

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    Easter has a good point.
    Debloating seems to be gaining popularity but most people don't understand what it means and what it does.
    OS-es come with many stuff in order to support as many hardware and individual needs as they can.
    Most likely, you won't use many of those services and you may intuitively come to conclusion they needlessly consume your system's resources so it's better to shut them down or remove.
    It seems logical but it's not.
    Mainstream systems like Windows, Android, OSX are getting very smart. Features, background services and drivers you don't use are in the sleeping state and use the least or no resources in their freezing state.
    Removing a system component/app which is frozen and takes no resources is useless job. What you see in your RAM usage app is not what you think it is.
    Every modern OS tries to predict your needs and making some apps loading faster than others. That's the cache memory.
    Without cache memory, your apps will always start slow because there is no data from the app in RAM.
    Now, let's get back to "debloating". Before "debloating" you should know what app you don't need is using too much resources.
    The matter of fact, it's going to be an third party app.
    Just "removing" a freezed system app is a nice placebo but analyzing this app you may easily find that it had no role in your battery drawn.
    My point is, "debloating" is just removing things which were frozen anyway.
     
  6. TairikuOkami

    TairikuOkami Registered Member

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    After a clean install, my system is completely unusable, it lags like hell, after "debloating", it runs nice and smooth. I always take a personal experience over reviews based on opinions of people, who have never actually tried it.
    When people talk about resources, they automatically assume, it is about RAM, it also involves CPU, I/O and Network. Look at number of threads in CPU tab, number of processes matter. Still, sleeping Cortana uses up to 200MB RAM.
    No, they are not, they just want people to think that. I had a game crashing because of insufficient RAM, people suggested to buy more RAM, I used RAM cleaner and imagine that, it worked. Windows memory management is flawed and MS refuses to fix it. Windows cleans cached memory after it is needed, but when app wants to run, it checks for available RAM, it considers cached RAM as used RAM. Tools like ISLC were designed to fix MS's lack of common sense.
     
  7. EASTER

    EASTER Registered Member

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    I never really had to massively Debloat Windows 8 in any of the series of those on hand. Just shut down and disable various services and the like. It was really actually to my personal benefit to skip 7, hold on to XP, then when 8 arrived, transition to what then what was the newest Windows. Over the course of time and with the service pack upgrade to 8.1 it really made Windows sing. Something that it's doing to this very moment and incredibly more friendly than the Telemetry ridden 10 folks have had to put up with courtesy the distorted updates and such other routine annoyances.

    Always also done my own tweaking Windows 8.1 if that can be called a form of Debloat but I never have nor would trust any program to mass Debloat my Windows 8 simply because it's not that difficult to, for one, use PowerShell to tug out things and safely. If an error did happen which unbalanced the O/S it's always as simple as making good use of Tweaking.com's fantastic repair utility to reorient it back to normal again. Whatever that might mean to certain other user's.
     
  8. johndoa

    johndoa Registered Member

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    I've never had the ram leaking problem on any Win system. Most people don't have it although it might happen. Have you confirmed the rogue process in the task manager? It could be anything, virus, bad driver or app service. I don't think MS has anything to fix for that matter. I would like they remove all the crap I don't use in Windows instead of me removing it by myself on every fresh install.
     
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