DDR2-533 Memory (How can I tell)

Discussion in 'hardware' started by jpcummins, Dec 2, 2008.

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  1. jpcummins

    jpcummins Registered Member

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    This is another post that will indicate just how computer illiterate I am. The invoice I have indicates I have an AMD Athlon 64 3500+ CPU with 512MB DDR2-533 Memory. I am thinking of increasing to 1024MB. I looked at several sites that have DDR2-533 Memory for sale and became confused more than ever. Apparently there are different types of DDR2-533 Memory. SDRAM, DIMM, 240 pin, all of this means nothing to me. Is there a software that will tell me exactly what type I need to order. I would like to do this myself instead of having to take it in to a shop. As always any and all replies will be appreciated and I will thank you in advance.

    John
     
  2. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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  3. ThunderZ

    ThunderZ Registered Member

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    Crucial is a decent place to start. I do not know if they still offer the free scan. Be aware it can give false results on the amount, type of memory your lap top can use. I know it did on my old lap top. You best bet is to visit the laptop manufacturers website. It should give the complete specs on your machine and also tell you the maximum amount, type, and configuration that will work for you.
     
  4. jpcummins

    jpcummins Registered Member

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    My computer is a desk top and was built for me last year. I should have had the maximum memory installed then but didn't. I did the scan from the site Ronjor suggested and it gave me a pretty good idea of what I need. But, I am not a very adventurous person so what I may end up doing is to take the memory out of the machine and take it to a shop and just order the same thing. At least I will have a fairly good idea of what the memory should cost. I truly appreciate the replies.

    John
     
  5. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    In that case John, I would talk to the builders of your computer. They should be able to tell you exactly what memory you need.
     
  6. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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    Perhaps you could use CPU-Z to find out exactly the RAM you have, looking at the SPD tab.
     
  7. innerpeace

    innerpeace Registered Member

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    Good idea! He could also look under the mainboard tab and look up the make and model of the motherboard for more details or post it here for more advice.

    Prices are so low for memory now that adding a 1GB stick to your existing 512MB wouldn't cost much more if you system allows it. Even adding a dual-channel 1x1GB kit is affordable.

    Here is a learning center with basic info about desktop memory.
    http://www.newegg.com/product/CategoryIntelligence.aspx?Subcategory=147
     
  8. Firecat

    Firecat Registered Member

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    There is only one type of DDR2 memory. DIMM, 240-pin, SDRAM - all of this means nothing to you, if it says DDR2 - go ahead and buy it.

    DDR2-533 is the minimum speed for any DDR2 RAM module available today. even if you get a higher speed module, it will adjust itself to run at the same speed as your existing DDR2-533 module (533MHz, or 266*2). Now all you need to really check is whether you are buying from a reputed vendor. If you don't plan to overclock then valueRAM from Kingston or Corsair or even Transcend will do just fine.

    The only possible problem that might arise is of voltages - but this is again an issue only if you are an enthusiast and buying enthusiast-level RAM modules rather than valueRAM. Note that valueRAM means the cheaper, "standard" RAM sticks - they are just the RAM sticks in the package with some manuals (that depends on the vendor) and no fuss, just fit the module onto your motherboard and enjoy. Enthusiast-level RAM will have additional features such as protective metal casing around the RAM stick to absorb and radiate heat, allowing for better overclocking. And of course, enthusiast RAM costs more. :)

    The important thing while making such purchases is to check whether the package says DIMM or SO-DIMM. For normal desktop PCs; DIMM is what you are looking for, not SO-DIMM.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2008
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