copying hard drive to new computer

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by todd8667, Apr 10, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. todd8667

    todd8667 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2006
    Posts:
    2
    Hello, I am a relatively naive computer user and am seeking advice. I am in the process of buying a new computer, and am wondering if there is a way to use Acronis True Image to get all of the data AND programs/software from my old computer to my new computer, i.e., to copy the contents of my current hard drive to my new hard drive. Basically, I would like to migrate all data and software from the old computer to the new one. Is there a way to do this, and if so, could someone advise me on how to proceed? I do have an external hard drive that I can use if needed. Thanks in advance for any guidance.
     
  2. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Posts:
    25,885
    Hello todd8667,

    Thank you for your interest in Acronis Disk Backup Software.

    Please note that there are two approaches available:

    Clone Disk - transfers the entire contents of one disk drive to another;

    Backup - creates a special archive file for backup and disaster recovery purposes;

    Please read more in this FAQ article.

    Actually, Clone Disk approach is usually used to upgrade the hard drive (e.g. install a larger disk), while Backup approach is basically dedicated for the complete data backup and disaster recovery purposes.

    Since you are interested in cloning of your hard drive, I would recommend you to follow Clone Disk approach.

    Please also note that we recommend you to unplug one of the hard drives right after the disk cloning process has been finished, since keeping both original and cloned hard drives connected might cause different boot or drive letter assignment problems.

    You can find the detailed information on how to use Acronis True Image 9.0 Home in the respective User's Guide.

    If you have any further questions please feel free to ask.

    Thank you.
    --
    Tatyana Tsyngaeva
     
  3. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Posts:
    2,318
    I fear that Tatyana's solution would not in fact work in your circumstances. You should first consider what operating system,if any, you will be getting with your new computer and the terms of the manufacturer's waranty. It may well be that by removing/overwritng the supplied software you will void the waranty and lose the right to the supplier's support.
    If you do decide to go ahead with your proposal you should perform Sys-Prep on both computers and follow the procedures exactly. Links to Sys-Prep can be found in these pages.
    If you choose the simpler route of re-installing your Apps on the new computer there is a Microsoft wizard for transfering files settings and data to your new machine. Your external hard drive would be ideal to effect the transfers. There would be no need to use True Image at this stage, just a simple copy and paste to and from the external drive would do the job.

    Xpilot
     
  4. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2005
    Posts:
    4,751
    I agree with Xpilot. SysPrep does not necessarily make everything alright in terms of running on a different system and you are leaving yourself open for obscure problems in the future. What's worse, when something doesn't work you'll be wondering if it is because you copied the old stuff over.

    FWIW, I consider a new machine an opportunity for 2 things; to get rid of the junk I no longer use by not reinstalling it and as a learning experience to refresh my mind on the installation of the various apps and configuring the system the way I want it.

    Yes, it takes some time but you'll have 80+% of it done fairly quickly.
     
  5. Chutsman

    Chutsman Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2005
    Posts:
    1,181
    Location:
    Brandon, Florida, USA
    Definitely agree with the above two. Just reinstall the programs and transfer your data files and other documents via the external drive. You will get rid of a lot of junk that has accumulated in the registry in the old system.
     
  6. todd8667

    todd8667 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2006
    Posts:
    2
    Thanks to everyone for the helpful advice. I agree that it would be better to simply reinstall the applications/software onto the new computer. The problem is, however, that I no longer have many of the original CDs that were used to install the software on my computer; therefore, reinstalling many of the more expensive programs is not possible without purchasing them again. So with that piece of information, does that change your advice/input on how to proceed?
     
  7. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2004
    Posts:
    3,329
    Location:
    San Rafael, CA
    Well, before you do anything else with the new computer, install TrueImage and make a backup image of the entire hard drive (all partitions) and make a Recovery CD. Then if anything fails, you can get back to the machine state as you bought it.

    Second, you will need a real Windows installation CD not simply a restore CD or restore file stored on the hard drive. You may have to buy this separately from the PC unless you are buying from a clone dealer or building the system yourself.

    Restore the image of your old computer to the new one. Don't even try to boot the system after doing this. Immediately, run the Windows setup from the Windows install CD and do an "Upgrade in Place." (Search for that term in the Microsoft Knowledge base and you will get the instructions.) This installation will identify the hardware on your new computer and replace the files that were used for your old hardware.

    At the end of the upgrade in place, boot the system and check for any other drivers that you need to add separately from their setup disks. These include the special drivers for the motherboard as well as any other hardware. Check your software and uninstall any programs that don't work properly.

    I've used this approach several times, and it usually works. If it fails, you can restore that image you made at the very beginning and you are no worse off.
     
  8. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Posts:
    2,318
    If you have registered your expensive programs with the producers and or have other proof of ownership it would be worth contacting them for replacement CDs or they may even offer a download service. If they have been aquired in some way other than purchase originally then buying them now would be the way to go.

    Xpilot.
     
  9. nepenthe

    nepenthe Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2006
    Posts:
    2
    I have a similar issue. I am upgrading from a P4 2.4c cpu system to a Opteron 170 dual core. Never before have I not been able just to pop a root drive from one system into another, load the new board drivers I needed, strip the old ones and enjoy the new computer. The problem is beyond just loading the myriad of programs, tools and apps (A truly daunting task). It is also all the cookies and passwords (My wife WILL kill me). I purchased true image to copy the drive before dropping into the system. Needless to say, I am getting a BSoD....

    EDIT>>> I can get to win xp pro screen via safe mode, though it will not permit me to load any drivers.

    Is there a simple step by step in using sysprep with acronis. I would be very grateful for a nice cliff note version.

    TIA,
    david
     
  10. Chutsman

    Chutsman Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2005
    Posts:
    1,181
    Location:
    Brandon, Florida, USA
    Nepenthe, phew ... I can't help with your dilema, but if you do get out of it, be sure to keep your passwords (and user ids) in something like a Word file - works for me.

    Oh one thing you might try is to use the Repair function in WinXP. But there are two Repair functions that XP has. Boot with the XPPro cd as if you were going to install XP. Ignore the first Repair option you get and go on to the next dialog windows until you see the next Repair option. This one will not remove your programs or settings.
     
  11. nepenthe

    nepenthe Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2006
    Posts:
    2

    Chutsman,

    Thank you so much for the quick response.

    I am familiar with the first repair screen, however I have never come across a second one. Hmmm.

    Evidentally, sysprep requires indentical mass controllers, which might not be the case with these two different motherboards.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.