Consumers “don’t care about privacy”, survey finds

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by SweX, Jun 21, 2013.

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  1. SweX

    SweX Registered Member

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    http://www.telecoms.com/153782/consumers-dont-care-about-privacy-survey-finds/
     
  2. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Well, there's Maslow's hierarchy of needs ;)
     
  3. Tarnak

    Tarnak Registered Member

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    Well, they will wake up one day, when they are in totalitarian state. ;)

    Oh jeez!... why was I sleeping?
     
  4. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Hey, they were busy -- working, raising families and consuming ;)
     
  5. Nebulus

    Nebulus Registered Member

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    For many people, "privacy" is an abstract concept. For instance, for some people privacy doesn't include information like location, name of friends, age, and so on (because in real life they freely share this information with others), but the same people will probably consider a breach of privacy if someone would record their conversations, take photos of them in their homes, giving up their credit card information and so on.
    So unless the "privacy" is clearly defined, any study can be biased towards either one result (people don't care about privacy) or the opposite one.
     
  6. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

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    Most consumers...are idiots. No worries, we'll carry the banner until they wake up...they can thank us later.

    PD
     
  7. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Registered Member

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    If you look at the source for the survey, Amdocs Limited is a provider of software and services for communications, media and entertainment industry service providers.

    What that tells me is that the survey - no matter how "professionally" organized - it most likely was not from an independent source even if it may have fairly represented the data, and thus was likely "cherry picked' to reflect what the industry wanted to (mis)feed the public.

    Of course, consumers care about their privacy - they just are not aware of whom and how is collecting information about them, so they are likely to believe anything that feeds them what the industry wants them to think.

    Will the idiots ever wake up? First they have to start thinking and finding out about the serious issues, and then take action when they find out the truth.

    -- Tom
     
  8. DesuMaiden

    DesuMaiden Registered Member

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    They think sacrificing privacy and civil liberties for safety is the correct modus operandi . This is incorrect. Stripped of civil liberties and privacy, a tyrannical government can do whatever it wants to its citizens.
     
  9. nerdstein

    nerdstein Registered Member

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    SHOCKING! I would have thought that people that post their entire lives on facebook, twitter, etc would be a little more concerned with privacy.

    "I don't have anything to hide".
     
  10. JRCATES

    JRCATES Registered Member

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    Simply put, I don't believe this "data".

    There was a report on the news last night contradicting this and reporting the exact opposite (which seems much more likely).

    Also, it's been proven time and time again that "research/surveys/polls" can skew data and ask questions in a way to get the results that they want. Not to mention, they can also "target" a particular audience that it likely to give them the results that they want.

    I worked in market research for a very short amount of time once I graduated from college...and we had "qualifiers" (i.e. - questions that would essentially eliminate a person who wasn't a member of the group that was likely to give the results that the company paying for the survey was looking for) to get the "target group" they were looking for to answer the questions.

    In a world of well over a billion people...forgive me for not putting much credence into a "sample sized study" that included just over a few thousand "consumers in developing markets."
     
  11. DesuMaiden

    DesuMaiden Registered Member

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    That kind of mentality is dangerous for the populace as it allows the government to unconstitutionally and unethically invade people's privacy. Once you accepted a small demand, then you will accept increasingly unreasonable demands. Everyone has the right to privacy, and once you give this up to the government, they can strip you of any form of privacy. For example, the FBI can now skim through your emails at their own free will. Violating your right to privacy. That's an outrageous violation of privacy, yet most people tolerate it, because Big Brother claims that they are doing this in the name of fighting "terrorism". The truth is the government is using these evil police state surveillance tactics in order to suppress political dissent by being able to unconstitutionally infringe upon your privacy at any time they wish.
     
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