Configuring Xerobank after Australia starts Filtering the Internet?

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by Hendry, Dec 15, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Hendry

    Hendry Registered Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    Posts:
    6



    It's official Australia is becoming Nazi Germany/Iran/North Korea police state.

    Fortunately right now the filter is not up yet. But how will I be able to use Xerobank after these Police state ~TOS~ start censoring legal yes legal porn sites as well as youtube links to protect the children.


    Coming from the US it's amazing the Australian people tolerate these do gooder nazi politicials that ~TOS~ on there rights. I think both political parties support censoring the internet. What the ~TOS~ is wrong with this country.

    Any help is greatly appreciated.

    Thank You

    Hendry
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 15, 2009
  2. Hendry

    Hendry Registered Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    Posts:
    6
  3. snowdrift

    snowdrift Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Posts:
    394
    Hendry, I would go on over to xerobank.com and sign up. I am not sure what the closest location to you would be, but Steve T. can help you out.
     
  4. stackz

    stackz Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2007
    Posts:
    619
    Location:
    Sydney Australia
    I wouldn't worry, the bill hasn't made it through the senate. On the off chance it does, the filter is about as strong as a bullet proof vest made of tissue paper.
     
  5. I no more

    I no more Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2009
    Posts:
    358
    All these governments are doing is throwing money at the VPN providers. Nothing more. When alcohol was outlawed, people were still able to drink. All it did was create a shift of power.

    The countries with the most lax internet regulation are the ones that are going to see a spike in traffic. Even if a website is globally banned, it means very little. Once no one can view the website, another one is created in its place. Then everyone shifts their traffic to the countries with the least internet regulation, so they can view that website. It's absolutely foolhardy to try to censor the internet. In order to effectively censor the internet, you would probably have to create white lists instead of black lists. Or otherwise ban entire countries that provide uncensored internet.

    And I'm personally getting sick of Western smugness about freedom, censorship, etc. What kind of arrogance does it take to criticize other countries for lack of freedom while simultaneously doing the exact same thing? ~Phrase removed - TOS violation.~
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 15, 2009
  6. SteveTX

    SteveTX Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Posts:
    1,641
    Location:
    TX
    I would fight it, but I wouldn't worry. The harder they grip the more will slip through their fingers. XeroBank will continue to find ways to provide anonymous internet access, including censorship circumvention where needed.
     
  7. chronomatic

    chronomatic Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Posts:
    1,343
    It's not so much that it will be difficult to get around the filters (it wont be, Australian teenagers have already done it in the trial runs), but it's the fact that these filters are going to A) waste a ton of money and B) dramatically slow the internet in Australia down and C) Block many legit sites as has been proven in trial runs. Moreover, any blacklisting approach is doomed to failure. Just look at the Anti-Virus industry and its blacklisting approach -- an utter failure.

    P.S. I am not an Australian but I think it is wise for all of us other Westerners to keep an eye on this story because there is no doubt the NWO is looking to impose 1984 tactics like this on all of us.
     
  8. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2005
    Posts:
    5,096
    My understanding is that the technique/method the filter uses is DNS blocking (A-record?), and if so, then it propagates throughout the DNS hierarchy or just the DNS resolver hierarchy in Austrailia (or maybe just to DNS neighbors in the Internet?).

    If this is so, then how is it possible to circumvent the DNS block? If this is not so, then how - possibly by using Whois that perhaps would return the ip address (numbered) - which then begs the question of what is different in the operation of Whois vs DNS blocking, or is Whois not operationally affected by DNS blocking?

    Or, does circumvention depend primarily on using DNS non-blocking name servers, and how does one find them?

    -- Tom
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.