Cloning a Win10 OS to another computer with TeraByte Unlimited software

Discussion in 'backup, imaging & disk mgmt' started by Brian K, Jul 29, 2021.

  1. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    This tutorial will be of use to those familiar with TeraByte software and a pigs breakfast to non users. I'll keep it brief but if you have questions, please ask.

    Create an IFW image of the Win10 partition on the source GPT disk. UEFI system. You don't need to backup other partitions. Win10 only.

    In the target computer with a Win10 OS, install BootIt UEFI (BIU).
    A Boot Item will be created. Edit the Boot File and confirm you see \EFI\Microsoft.001\Boot\bootmgfw.efi
    The current Win10 will boot from this item.
    Use Partition Work in BIU to create Free Space for the new Win10 restore. The Free Space can be on any disk.

    Boot IFL and restore the Win10 image you just created. In Options, leave the defaults and also put a tick in "Change GUID". In the New Name field, give it a sensible name, different from your current Win10.
    DO NOT REBOOT.

    In the dock, click OSD Tool, Physical Drive, choose the just restored Win10, Remove installed drivers, Remove all drivers. If this computer has a NVMe drive, Install default NVM Express Controller from OSD Tool.

    Still in IFL, in the dock, click TBOSDT. At the prompt enter...
    run fixboot.tbs
    Choose the just restored Win10, Confirm, Setup a Boot Configuration in partition (EFI System Partition), Setup a full configuration, ignore the Select boot options... screen and choose Exit.

    Now you can reboot, but into BIU. Press Esc when you see the Boot Menu. This puts you on the BIU desktop.
    Click Boot Edit, Add, fill in Identity (eg copied Win10), the HD will be the one containing the ESP, Boot field is EFI System Partition.
    In Boot File, click Browse and find Microsoft.002, Boot, bootmgfw.efi
    In Boot File you should see \EFI\Microsoft.002\Boot\bootmgfw.efi
    Put a tick in Rename Directory, click OK. OK again.
    Boot Edit again, select the original Win10 item, Edit, in GPT Details hide the new Win10 partition. OK
    Select the new Win10 item, Edit, in GPT Details hide the old Win10 partition. OK. OK again.
    Reboot
    On the Boot Menu, select the new Win10 and click Boot.
    You will briefly see Getting Devices Ready and then the Win10 desktop.

    Do Windows Update. This will fix the screen resolution and install drivers. Uninstall any software specific to the other computer. eg video drivers.

    Reboot. If new Win10 boots instead of BIU, boot into the BIOS on the next occasion and select to boot from BootIt UEFI. This reactivates BIU.

    New Win10 will need more work. eg changing drive letters if needed, etc.

    I can do the entire clone procedure in just over 10 minutes. Expect to take longer.

    Edit... If the original Win10 is activated, the new Win10 will also be activated.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2021
  2. Mr.X

    Mr.X Registered Member

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    Great tutorial, thanks a lot.
    If I can suggest anything, to change the title by adding Unlimited cause that's the softwares full name.
     
  3. Mr.X

    Mr.X Registered Member

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    How come. I mean, target machine has different hardware so Windows should lose activation.
     
  4. cruelsister

    cruelsister Registered Member

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    It does, but at the same time really does not. A couple of weeks ago I changed my MB and upon reboot Windows (10H1) informed me that the product was no longer activated.

    Was then directed to the Activation Settings section in Updates and Security. From there I had to logon to my Microsoft account and let their servers do the rest. A couple of seconds later Windows activated itself (process would have been easier if I had actually saved a hard copy of my Win10 license, but such annoyances are hardly insurmountable).
     
  5. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    Just give it a few minutes and Activation will happen. I can't recall having to initiate the process but the comment from cruelsister is encouraging.
     
  6. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    I mentioned DO NOT REBOOT. If you reboot before Removing all drivers, "all is lost" and you will have to delete the restored Win10 partition and start again. The procedure is safe in that if you make a mistake then delete the restored partition and start again. The original Win10 isn't altered.
     
  7. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    Cloning Win11 from computer A to computer B works fine too. Same method.
     
  8. roger_m

    roger_m Registered Member

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    Whenever I clone a Windows install, I just do a normal clone, without taking any extra steps. The same is the case if I take my SSD from an old system and put it in a new one. The only instance this hasn't worked for me, and drivers had to be removed, was with a Windows 10 install that was well-used and abused, and has some major issues.

    For the most part, Windows 10 and even Vista, 7 and 8, can recognise on the first boot that there is new hardware, and won't load drivers for any devices which aren't present in the new system.
     
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