Chromebook compared to Unix - any flavor

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by kdcdq, Jan 18, 2013.

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  1. kdcdq

    kdcdq Registered Member

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    I have been reading with great interest all the hu-bub about the Chromebook; it runs a stripped-down version of Unix. They are selling like hot cakes with current selling prices above retail, and people are still buying them. From what I have read, all you seem to get is a fast booting and quick Internet browsing machine for appx $200.

    SO, I have been experimenting around with different version of Unix, and I have about become a convert. :thumb: I had NO IDEA how fast Unix is comapred to Windows 7, especially on lower-end machines. :isay:

    My point is: Why limit what you can do with a Chromebook when you can have a lot more functionality with the Unix flavor of your choice? :)
     
  2. Because the complexity of a full Linux system means less speed and more bugs. :)

    (I've used ChromeOS briefly, and hated it for being all cloud-based; the idea of being unable to even log in without a Google account is a bit too much. That said, it would probably be wonderful for novices who find Windows too high-maintenance.)
     
  3. NormanF

    NormanF Registered Member

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    You can run Google apps off-line without having to connect to the cloud. This increases the Chromebook's usefulness considerably.
     
  4. Oh I know, I just prefer my desktop login not to be dependent on my having a known Google account.
     
  5. Andz

    Andz Registered Member

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    Chrome OS seems to radically simplify security. The assumption is that Google does a good job keeping things tight, and as far as I know that's a sound assumption. That issue is seperate from the other important issue of Google's privacy practices.
     
  6. NormanF

    NormanF Registered Member

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    The Linux core on the Google Chromebook is based on Gentoo Linux.
     
  7. Really? Last time I tried it, it was very obviously based on Ubuntu 9.04; if what you say is true there must have been big changes. Does it use any features from hardened Gentoo?
     
  8. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Registered Member

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    I believe it uses multiple features from pax/grsecurity, but not all of them.
     
  9. kdcdq

    kdcdq Registered Member

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    Exactly. That is kind of where I was going with this thread. What a lot of people want and deserve is the "Apple Experience": turn it on and start using it without worrying about viruses, trojans, key-loggers, adware, spyware; you get my drift.

    I have been messing around with Fedora 18 LXDE Live on a low-end machine and have been impressed with it's boot time and overall performance. Being new to Unix, however, I sometimes a get a bit overwhelmed with the number of different releases and versions of Unix to choose from. :isay:
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013
  10. Andz

    Andz Registered Member

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    In my experience, installing Linux on hardware as old as 2007 does require some effort in choosing a distribution. With faster hardware one can easily go with the default choice of the current Ubuntu LTS. With Chrome it doesn't matter because it comes on new hardware.
     
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