Centos question

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by mattdocs12345, Mar 6, 2014.

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  1. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

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    I've loaded Centos 6.5 CD image.

    1. What is the name of the File Manager?
    2. How do I get root privilages for the file manager?
     
  2. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Gnome 2 I assume?
    Nautilus, launch it as root.
    Mrk
     
  3. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

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    After some investigation I found that it is Nautilus.
    However the usual command su nautilus
    gives me this:

    Which is fine but after I type in the password instead of getting root privilages I get this:

     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2014
  4. fblais

    fblais Registered Member

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    Type "su" to get root privileges.
    The start a text editor (gedit?) and open the "sudoers" file which in /etc if I remember correctly.
    Find the line beginning with ROOT and with some ALL in the line.
    Copy it to a new line and replace ROOT with your username.
    Save the file.
    Next time, sudo should work. :)
     
  5. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

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    Actually I found this to work as well.

    I type in su and put in my password and then sudo for specific application.
    Or is it really unsafe to go root everytime?
     
  6. Lucy

    Lucy Registered Member

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    Hi,

    Your user is not in the list of sudoers
    While under root, do visudo and under the root add your own user:
    user ALL=(ALL) ALL
     
  7. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

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    Can you be more specific?
     
  8. keithpeter

    keithpeter Registered Member

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  9. Lucy

    Lucy Registered Member

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    Yes the link above answers your request of specificity (http://www.centos.org/docs/4/4.5/Security_Guide/s3-wstation-privileges-limitroot-sudo.html).

    Furthermore, if you happen to be afraid of the given warning (in the provided link):
    You can always set the by default 5min period to 0.
    In visudo, replace the line:
    By
    This will remove your sudo rights after each performed action under sudo.
     
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