Buying TP-LINK TD-W8968, Good Choice?

Discussion in 'hardware' started by subhrobhandari, Mar 23, 2015.

  1. subhrobhandari

    subhrobhandari Registered Member

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    My old Huawei router is in its last days, and I will have to buy a router+modem soon for my ADSL. I am thinking about buying this router, based on reviews it seems good for the cost, plus some discount from an online retailer. I just need something for basic home networking, to share the connection between all devices.

    Code:
    http://www.tp-link.com/en/products/details/?model=TD-W8968
    Anyone got any idea whether this would be a good choice? I am thinking about getting the V3.
     
  2. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Understand you do NOT have to buy a router+modem integrated device. You can buy and use separates if you want. For example, if your current ADSL modem is still good, you can just get a new wireless router and connect it to your existing modem through its WAN port, then connect your computers and other devices through its 4-port Ethernet switch or through its WAP (wireless access point). In this way, should you move to some place that has cable instead of ADSL, or should you need to just replace the modem, you can just buy a new modem instead of the whole integrated device again.

    I don't see this "V3" you are talking about unless you mean that listed on the download page. And if so, that just indicates the most recent version under production, not an option or model you can choose from. So when you order/buy the TD-W8968, you should automatically get the latest revision (V3) unless it has been sitting on the store shelf for a long time. So you need to buy from an outlet that has a large and constant turnover so you get the newest version in production, and a product recently made.

    If you are not talking about the V3 as shown on the Download page, please provide a link to the product you are referring to.

    The TD-W8968 your url goes to seems like a good system. Units with external and movable antennas often allow for better wireless access with devices that are further away or on the other side of several walls/floors/ceilings that are laden with lots of wires, metal pipes or metal studs. With external antenna you can just move the antennas instead of turning the whole unit. I also like that it has a wifi on/off button (instead of having to go into the menu) and it supports network printing which is a HUGE convenience and better for security (compared to sharing a printer connected to a computer).
     
  3. subhrobhandari

    subhrobhandari Registered Member

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    I agree, I could buy either modem/router separately, but as of now the I will be getting around 40-45% discount on this model, so that essentially brings down the cost of this on par with a router. I meant the latest version as v3. The online retailer is currently one of India's biggest retailer, so I will be getting a V3, as well confirmed with them. Also one of my reason for going for this, in future I might subscribe to a cable broadband and then this would be useful too.

    There's another model from DLink
    Code:
    http://www.dlinkmea.com/site/index.php/site/productDetails/232
    But I am thinking about going for TP-Link as it has more features and some reviewers complained about signal loss/connectivity issues after few hours.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2015
  4. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    No! ADSL and Cable are different. You cannot use a ADSL modem with cable, and you cannot use a cable modem with ADSL.

    That is exactly why I said above,
     
  5. subhrobhandari

    subhrobhandari Registered Member

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    But this is from the product description page

     
  6. prius04

    prius04 Registered Member

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    Yes, and what that means is you can use the product as a router in conjunction with a cable modem.

    So, in the event you ever decide to switch to cable internet, you can connect a cable modem to the device and use it as a router, but you will need to buy a cable modem.
     
  7. subhrobhandari

    subhrobhandari Registered Member

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    Ah, thanks for clarifying. I was a little bit confused. Still, considering the discount, this is on par with the price of either a modem or router and with useful features.
     
  8. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    These devices are "integrated" network devices.

    Note a real "basic" router has only 1 input and 1 output and is used to connect or isolate two networks. But your typical home router is really a integrated device that is composed of a basic router and a integrated 4-port Ethernet switch. These are two "discrete" network devices are connected internally and share the same main circuit board (PCB), case and power supply. To connect this device to the Internet, you would connect a Ethernet cable from the router's WAN port to a cable modem or ADSL modem, and then the modem would be connected to the ISP's cable.

    A "wireless router" adds a WAP - wireless access point. Three discrete network devices connected internally sharing the same PCB, case and PS. This device would also be connected via an Ethernet cable to a cable or ADSL modem, then out to the Internet

    Your integrated device goes one step further and integrates a ADSL modem inside the same box too. The 4-port Ethernet switch, router, WAP and modem are all be connected internally - but are really discrete network devices.

    If you change from your current ADSL ISP to a cable ISP, you would disable or not use and bypass the internal ADSL modem, in effect, turning this device into "wireless router". You would then need to connect this wireless router to your new cable modem as prius04 describes above.

    Clear as mud, huh?

    If you will be remaining with your current ADSL provider for awhile, then I think this device may be worthwhile. But if you are moving soon and will be switching to cable, then there are many "wireless router" options that may serve you better and be more cost effective.
     
  9. subhrobhandari

    subhrobhandari Registered Member

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    Yeah, Its clear now. Actually this is for my parent's home, and as of now, I am stuck with my current ADSL provider. There is only one cable provider here but they just started their business and service is quite bad. So I will be with this ADSL for quite a while.
     
  10. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Sounds like a plan!
     
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