Bridge Mode and Repeater Mode

Discussion in 'hardware' started by Noob, Sep 30, 2013.

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  1. Noob

    Noob Registered Member

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    Easy question for all of you network pros.
    I searched for the differences between the two modes and this is what i understood.

    Bridge Mode: It's basically setting up a second wireless router to connect to your main wireless router Wi-Fi connection so you can "Plug" in nearby devices through a CAT cable. The problem with this setup is that it does not allows you to use the second router / bridge router as a second wireless antenna. So basically it only allows you to plug devices through a CAT cable.

    Repeater Mode: Allows you to use a second wireless router to connect to your main wireless router Wi-Fi connection and it repeats / re-streams your Wi-Fi connection thus expanding the Wi-Fi coverage / signal strength.

    Am i right?
     
  2. Noob

    Noob Registered Member

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    Cant believe no one has posted! :eek:
     
  3. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    You are mixing terms so you need to get an understanding of them first, then ask your questions.

    Note this is not really your fault - but the fault of marketing weenies who don't understand networking technologies making up names for things that don't really exist.

    So here are the facts. There is NO SUCH THING as a "wireless router". Wireless router is a marketing term for an "integrated device" that consists of at least 3 totally discrete networking devices.

    Device 1: Router - a "wired" networking device used to connect or isolate 2 separate networks.

    Device 2: WAP (wireless access point) - a device used to connect wireless "nodes" (computers, printers, etc) to the router via an internal wired connection.

    Device 3: Ethernet Switch - typically a 4-port switch used to connect nodes via Ethernet connection.

    Optional Device 4: Cable/DSL Modem which serves as the "gateway" device to the ISP.​
    http://www.teqlog.com/switch-vs-router-hub-bridge-repeater-wireless-access-point.html
     
  4. kdcdq

    kdcdq Registered Member

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    As has become customary :)) ), Bill is right on track with his response on the components of modern wireless routers. Virtually all wireless routers on the market today combine a router, a wireless access point, and an Ethernet switch; some also contain an integrated cable modem or DSL modem.

    I will attempt to answer the OPs questions:

    1) Bridge mode is actually composed of two wireless routers acting in a Master/Slave relationship. The Master router is the one connected to the Internet; the Slave router uses the Net connection of the Master for access to the Internet; the Slave is configured as the Bridge. Two separate IP networks are created using different IP addresses.

    Once the two routers are bridged, the Slave router-connected devices, both wired and wireless, can access the Internet on the Slaves own IP network by using the Master's physical Ethernet connection to the WAN. The OP is correct in that Ethernet-connected devices plugged in to the Slave router can access the Internet, BUT wireless devices can be attached to the Slave Router as well.

    2) Repeater mode is basically the same as described by the OP. The addition of a repeater-mode-configured router is an extension of the primary router's IP address range.
     
  5. Noob

    Noob Registered Member

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    I ended up buying a TP-Link AP and set it up as repeater mode. :D
    Have been working flawlessly since a week and a half ago.

    I also purchased a Powerline Ethernet adapter to hook up my desktop since it was too far from the main router and i didnt want to mess with ethernet cables. (First floor to second floor)
    Couldnt be happier, now i have strong signal on both levels and my desktop is hooked up directly to the router.
     
  6. kdcdq

    kdcdq Registered Member

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    Hey Noob, two comments:

    1) Glad you're up and going with your AP in repeater mode. :thumb:

    2) TP-Link (in my humble 20 years of experience) makes good affordable products that fit a wide range of networking needs. :)
     
  7. Noob

    Noob Registered Member

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    Couldnt be more true. Some people are scared because they are a chinese brand but based on personal experience and my buddies, they are a reliable brand for a very very competitive price.

    Just as an example. The cheapest Linksys Powerline Ethernet adapter i could find was around $80 here where i live and thats considering i was looking at a specialized store, in big brick and mortar stores it was retailing for $130.
    So just before i gave up i found the TP-Link retailing for $40. :D

    Oh and my main router is a Linksys.
     
  8. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Thanks. I hate to be wrong so I try hard to verify my facts before posting to ensure I am (or still) right. As I grow older and as the advances in IT technologies increase more and more rapidly, keeping up with the new, as well as all the changes to the old becomes more of a challenge - just on the technical side. So when marketing weenies interject terms that make no sense, technically, it becomes more of a challenge to all.

    Most Chinese electronics have good design and are well made using quality parts. But there are exceptions. I agree that TP-Link has a good reputation for quality, reliable products. I think the big push now is to stop "outsourcing" to bring jobs home to help local economies. And I am all for that. But the reality is it, it is hard, if not impossible to find locally made electronics. Even if made here, they likely are assembled using parts made in China.

    A word of caution here. Especially for safety, but also performance, it is essential the wall outlets you connect to are properly wired and have a direct path to Earth ground. This is best verified by a certified electrician - especially in older homes where codes were less stringent, or where the outlets may be worn or damaged. But even new homes can be improperly wired or have a faulty outlet.

    At the very least, I recommend you (and everyone) get and use a AC Outlet Tester. I recommend one with a GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupt) indicator as it can be used to test bathroom and kitchen outlets too. These testers can be found for your type and voltage outlet, foreign or domestic, at most home improvement stores, or even the electrical department at Walmart.
     
  9. Noob

    Noob Registered Member

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    To be honest i dont know if the wall outlets are grounded LOL
    The only outlets around the house that have GFCI are the ones in the bathrooms.
     
  10. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    That's common as most people don't stand over a kitchen sink with a hair dryer, or sit in a tub of water while toasting bread.

    Still, you should check all your outlets. Proper grounding is essential for safety and also to minimize electrical noise and RFI/EMI problems that can wreck havoc on other devices (especially wireless), and impact performance of data transfer.
     
  11. kdcdq

    kdcdq Registered Member

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    Hey Bill, you're welcome.... :cool:
     
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