Boot Disk Advice please

Discussion in 'backup, imaging & disk mgmt' started by kennyboy, Jul 14, 2014.

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  1. kennyboy

    kennyboy Registered Member

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    I have recently changed over to Win 7 64bit. Late I know. My main imaging software that I have used since time began has been Drive Snapshot, and now with the new x64 machine I would like to use the 64bit version of DS.

    Imaging is fine with the 64bit version, but I was wondering what boot disk I can use with it, for disaster recovery. Nothing that I have tried (Bart PE, UBCD, Active@ etc) will run the 64bit version of DS.
    Is there such a thing as a 64bit Boot Disk, or have I lost the plot completely?
     
  2. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    kennyboy,

    You can use your 64-bit Win7 DVD. Or create a Win7 Recovery CD. 64-bit Drive Snapshot will run in that environment.
     
  3. kennyboy

    kennyboy Registered Member

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    Duh! Must have had a mental block here Brian. Never even thought about that. Many thanks for the help.
     
  4. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    Various methods....

    Boot from a Win7 DVD
    Next
    On the Install now window, click Repair your computer
    After the search completes, click Load Drivers
    click OK on Add drivers (but move the Add Drivers window to the very edge of your monitor before clicking OK)
    plug in a USB flash drive containing snapshot.exe
    double click Computer
    Navigate to snapshot.exe on the flash drive. Right click snapshot (the Application, file extensions aren't shown) and choose Open.
    click Cancel on the "Open" window
    click Cancel on the "Add Drivers" window
    Close (click the X) on the "System Recovery Options" window
    Minimize the "Install Windows" window

    Drive Snapshot is now visible and ready to use.


    Boot from a Win 8 DVD or UFD
    Next
    On the Install now window, click Repair your computer
    Troubleshoot
    Advanced options
    System Image Recovery
    Windows 8
    Cancel on Re-image your Computer
    Next
    Advanced
    Install a Driver
    click OK on Add Drivers (but drag the Add Drivers window to the very top left corner of your monitor before clicking OK)
    plug in a USB flash drive containing snapshot.exe (or snapshot64.exe). You can also use snapshot.exe on a HD partition.
    double click Computer
    (drive letters may be different from booted Win 8 )
    Navigate to snapshot.exe on the flash drive or HD partition. Right click snapshot (the Application, file extensions aren't shown) and choose Open.
    click Cancel on the "Open" window
    click Cancel on the "Add Drivers" window
    Drag the "Re-image your Computer" window to the bottom of your monitor so the Drive Snapshot window is in full view

    Drive Snapshot is ready to use.



    Instead of System Image Recovery you can click Command Prompt
    diskpart
    list vol
    (make a note of the drive letter you will need to use)
    exit
    (now the prompt is X:\Sources> )
    (change to the drive letter of the UFD or HD partition containing snapshot.exe. For example...)
    G:
    (now the prompt is G:\> )
    (you need to know if snapshot.exe is in the root or in a folder. If it was in G:\abc\def you would type...)
    CD \abc\def
    (now you can run snapshot)
    start snapshot64.exe

    Drive Snapshot is ready to use.





    If you don't have a Win7 DVD you can make a System Repair Disk. The same comments apply if your system is 64-bit. You will need snapshot64.exe as the System Repair Disk will be 64-bit.

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/w...em-repair-disc

    Boot the disk
    choose US keyboard
    Troubleshoot
    Advanced options
    System Image Recovery
    Cancel on Re-image your Computer
    Next
    Advanced
    Install a Driver
    click OK on Add Drivers (but move the Add Drivers window to the very edge of your monitor before clicking OK)
    plug in a USB flash drive containing snapshot.exe (or snapshot64.exe)
    double click Computer
    Navigate to snapshot.exe on the flash drive. Right click snapshot (the Application, file extensions aren't shown) and choose Open.
    click Cancel on the "Open" window
    click Cancel on the "Add Drivers" window
    Drag the "Re-image your Computer" window to the bottom of your monitor

    Drive Snapshot is now visible and ready to use.
     
  5. kennyboy

    kennyboy Registered Member

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    Many thanks for such comprehensive answers Brian. Will plough my way through them gradually, and decide on an option.

    Question: Seems a lot of hassle to use 64bit. Would the 32bit version restore an image taken with the 64bit version? (Have just tried to Mount and explore with the 32bit version, and that works ok)
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2014
  6. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    I think they produce the same image.
     
  7. Cruise

    Cruise Registered Member

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    Hi Brian,

    As another DS user (on Win7 x64) I would also ask for DS restores - is there a significant performance advantage using a 64-bit OS boot disk (running snapshot 64) as opposed to booting with a 32-bit disk (running snapshot 32)? :doubt:

    Cruise
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2014
  8. TheRollbackFrog

    TheRollbackFrog Registered Member

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    None whatsoever from my experience...
     
  9. Cruise

    Cruise Registered Member

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    Thanks Frog - I've been using a 32-bit Active@ BootDisk to run my DS-restores whenever there's a Win7 boot problem (which isn't very often) and that has always worked perfectly, but the OP had me wondering if I could do better. ;)

    Cruise
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2014
  10. TheRollbackFrog

    TheRollbackFrog Registered Member

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    Cruise, the only thing that's really different between the two OSes is the address space available to tasks that require a large bit of RAM. The 32-bit OS can only use a max of about 3.5gB of RAM per system, no larger. The 64-bit OS can get its hands on a lot more. Most tasks, other than huge photoshopping requirements or video editing/converting, etc., don't use a lot of RAM, imagers included. The same amount of CPU power (4-cores and 2-threads per core in an i7 for example) is available to both OSes. That's why you won't see much difference for most apps.
     
  11. Cruise

    Cruise Registered Member

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    I can understand that - thanks (again) Frog.
     
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