Black Hat Hackers Fail to Crack Secure Channels' Patented Encryption Technology

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by KeyPer4Life, Aug 14, 2014.

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  1. KeyPer4Life

    KeyPer4Life Registered Member

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    155 Hackers Took the "Can You Break This" Challenge; None Could Break Secure Channels' New PKMS2
    Patented Encryption Technology

    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/black-hat-hackers-fail-crack-172658809.html
     
  2. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    Only time will tell if their patented protocol and standard are "unbreakable". 155 hackers trying to break it in one week is IMO not guarantee for it's safety and invincibility.
     
  3. Nebulus

    Nebulus Registered Member

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    1. Basically Secure Channels invented nothing. What they are doing is this: "PKMS2 breaks a document into segments and encrypts each segment individually" with "FIPS certified third party encryption libraries" (see http://www.securechannels.com/technology/pkms2/ )

    2. "Hacker" does not equal "cryptanalyst".

    3. Even if all 155 hackers WERE cryptanalysts, that still means nothing. As I said above, Secure Channels didn't invent an encryption algorithm, they are just reusing the existing ones in another way.
     
  4. KeyPer4Life

    KeyPer4Life Registered Member

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    http://www.securechannels.com/secur...-patented-encrypted-technology-blackhat-2014/
     
  5. solardome

    solardome Registered Member

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    If you read the website more closely and look at the details of their tech, you will see that they they are using FIP's compliant algo's and 350 of their own proprietary from their library. They basically start where AES 256 leaves off and they seemed to have patented a a whole encryption process and not just the algo's. Maybe a cryptanalyst should contact them and see if they can break it.
     
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