BitArmor: Prevents cold boot attacks?

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by danielspencer2, May 4, 2010.

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  1. danielspencer2

    danielspencer2 Registered Member

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  2. doktornotor

    doktornotor Registered Member

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    When paranoia gets beyond certain point, it's best to take a break and/or seek medical help. If you are really absolutely paranoid and sure that NSA, CIA, FBI, KGB, MOSAD and bunch of others are going after you, don't use suspend to disk/RAM and unplug the power cord/remove the battery. Oh, and yeah - Super-cooling RAM. :rolleyes:

    (P.S. Good that they won't even let me know how much does their stuff cost w/o giving them an email address, ugh. Yeah, they have a 14 day trial... I hope a can of liquid nitrogen is supplied with install media for that)
     
  3. CloneRanger

    CloneRanger Registered Member

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    @doktornotor

    How much :eek: :eek: :eek: Guess you won't be buying it :D

    http://www.networkworld.com/news/2006/091806-bitarmor.html
     
  4. doktornotor

    doktornotor Registered Member

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    5PCs/$10K/3 years?!

    See.. now seriously. If I ever were in an industry where similar protection would be potentially beneficial, I'd insist on getting the full source code for the application and compiling it myself. Will that ever happen? Of course not. So, plain waste of money. If you are that paranoid, then the backdoor scenario comes to your mind first. If it's so incredibly low level, there's nothing that'd prevent it from doing the exact opposite of what you want - i.e., send all your "top secret" keys to the bad guys and government. And then, it becomes just pointless. :rolleyes:
     
  5. chronomatic

    chronomatic Registered Member

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    Yep. Any encryption software that does not make its source code available just simply cannot be trusted. Two of the world's leading cryptologists explain why in separate essays:

    Bruce Schneier is up first.

    Next up is Phil Zimmerman, creator of PGP.

    Read those two articles and you will see why open-source and peer review is a must in encryption software.
     
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