bad sectors on cloning failing drive

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by caulfiek, Sep 4, 2006.

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  1. caulfiek

    caulfiek Registered Member

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    my HD started to fail, I started to get bad sectors and "failed to read from xxxx errors" on chkdsk (+ other more obvious problems, like programs crashing and files disappearing).
    Anyhow I've run chkdsk a few times and got windows stabilised enough to attempt a clone, which True Image did no problem.

    disconnected the old drive, put on the new one and windows pops up no problem.

    My new drive still shows 6k on bad sectors in chkdsk but I think this should be OK as each drive has a tollerance to this, right? Otherwise chkdsk shows that the 'disk is clean'.

    But on Disk Director I get a "File Record Corrupted" message, when I click the disk properties. Whats does this mean, can it be fixed?

    Kieran
     
  2. bVolk

    bVolk Registered Member

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    Hello caulfiek,

    To prevent bad sector flags to be transferred to the new drive, you should not clone but perform a partition(s) restore with resize (from a previously created image) instead. The resize may be minimal if you do not really need it, but it should be done. Include also the MBR and Track 0 after telling the Recovery Wizard that you want to restore yet another partition and being taken back to the partition selection screen.

    You may also want to have a look at this thread:

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=145554
     
  3. starsfan09

    starsfan09 Registered Member

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    Do you have "Software" related "Bad Sectors"?? Or, do you have "Physical" Bad Sectors? There is a big difference. I think "Chkdsk" only checks for Software related Bad Sectors. You need to go to your HD manufactor, and download a Diagnostics program. Run the extended tests on the HD to determine if you actually have "Physical" Bad Sectors. Sometimes, the program can repair the Bad Sectors, but sometimes it can't. If it's determined that you have many Bad Sectors,... then I'd destroy the HD.
     
  4. Tabvla

    Tabvla Registered Member

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    Agree with bVolk....
    starsfan09 wrote....
    Be careful! Many of these Diagnostic programs are designed to "fix the disk". They are not designed to protect the data. The disk manufacturer assumes that you have backups of your data. Once your disk is fixed you can then restore your data. If you don't have tested backups don't run the diagnostic.
     
  5. caulfiek

    caulfiek Registered Member

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    it's check disk that reporting the bad sectors so I guess these are software errors. I've pulled out my old disk now (maxtor) but I'll plug it in a give it a shot with maxtor*powermax and see what it comes up with (still might be able to save it).
    I'm now using the new samsung sata drive to run windows, and it's running fine 'cept for the File Record Corrupted message on Disk Director and the bad sectors warning on chkdsk.

    I never got time to make an image of the original disk when it was good (yeh, how many times have you heard that eh), but all my data is saved to a seperate partition (with regular image backups!).

    So point is, seems like system has stablised but I seem to be stuck with the Fire Record Corrupt error. Does it matter, or should I scrap this install of windows (SP2 bang up to date, clean as a whistle and 'just right'), reformat my new drive and start from scratch?

    K
     
  6. Tabvla

    Tabvla Registered Member

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    Have you have run chkdsk with the /r switch? (chkdsk c:/r)

    Assuming that you have I would not scrap Windows and start again.

    Most bad sector errors can be eliminated by reformatting the disk. Therefore the quickest and easiest way to sort this is to buy another disk and then do the following:

    1. Create an image of the system partition using the "partition" option

    2. Mount the image to test that it will restore (use the Mount Image option)

    3. Restore the image to your new disk, but make sure that the partition size is slightly smaller/bigger. (For example, if the existing partition is 40GB then make the new partition either 38GB or 42GB).

    4. Test that Windows will boot from the new disk (you need to setup the MBR and Track 0 and the partition must be a Primary partition and set as Active).

    5. Now reformat you troublesome disk. 99% of the time the bad cluster errors will be removed during reformatting.
     
  7. caulfiek

    caulfiek Registered Member

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    thanks for your help, I'll give it a go, but won't be until later this week. I'll let you know how it goes.
     
  8. caulfiek

    caulfiek Registered Member

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    quick update, yes the disk is fried.
    Ran a full scan using the Maxtor PowerMax utility and it duely told me that I have a failing disk and gave me an RMA number.

    So now off the matrox website to see if they'll take the crock of crap back.

    Thanks for help anyhows
     
  9. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    I wonder if the diagnostic programs of other HD manufacturers provide RMAs at the end of failed tests.

    If they do it will save a whole bunch of emails.


    Xpilot
     
  10. alkolkin

    alkolkin Registered Member

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    I know this is late, but perhaps better late than never!
    I have used a product called Spinrite by Gibson Research for about 15 years! It will thoroughly examine any hard disk and attempt to fix any errors by moving data safely to a spot on the disk that is error free. If it cannot recover the data, it will mark the spot as bad so that it is not used by the operating system. Its one and only flaw is that it cannot deal with embedded soft RAID drives that require the inf files to be installed before booting (such as SI 3132 and NvRAID on various MOBO boards). It will deal with RAID that is hardware managed, however.

    It is a fabulous product that in many case will recover the bad spot and somehow remagnatize the hard disk. Its current version is version 6. I am not an employee of the company and have nothing to personally gain by recommending this product. The website is http://www.grc.com/default.htm
    Hope this helps everyone.*puppy*
     
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