Bad deal

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by sbolton, May 20, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. sbolton

    sbolton Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Posts:
    12
    I reformatted my Windows XP computer on May 8th. At that time I downloaded a trial version of Acronis. I made an ISO file of my system that day.

    I now need to go back to that date. I have a PDF file on this subject but for some reason it closes as soon as I open it.

    I have Nero installed on my computer. I have tried to burn the ISO image to a CD but I can't.

    I don't know what I am doing and I need help.

    thanks

    Steve Bolton
     
  2. nb47

    nb47 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2006
    Posts:
    183
    It (trial version) expires TODAY if you made it on the 8th ; that MIGHT or might NOT be your problem.
     
  3. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Posts:
    2,405
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    If you used TI to create a disk image of your entire computer (all partitions), then you can restore your disk or your system partition by

    1. Use the TI option "Create bootable mediia" and create a TI Rescue CD.

    2. Usse the TI Rescue CD to restore the *.tib files created on May 8. If you need to transfer the files from hard drive to DVD, it would be a plain windows copy procedure. Once copied to DVD, the DVD contentss would appear the same as when on hard drive (*.tib).
     
  4. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2007
    Posts:
    3,335
    Location:
    Florida - USA
    If you downloaded the Trial on May 8th is will be good until the 23rd (15 days) so you have a couple days to use it.

    But you need to clarify one thing ... as far as I know True Image doesn't do ISO files as a backup feature. Is this something new? The Backup files it makes end in .tib as GroverH pointed out. The only ISO file it makes is of the Rescue CD - you should at the very least make this CD before the Trial expires. It will let you do Restores but not Backups.
     
  5. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2004
    Posts:
    3,329
    Location:
    San Rafael, CA
    As pointed out, the only .ISO image that TI makes is for the Rescue CD. That image can be burned to a CD by Nero to create the rescue CD. However, it's simpler to just have TI create the rescue CD directly without making an ISO image.

    The backup image of a Windows XP SP3 computer would be more than 3GB and probably two or three times that size if any applications have been installed and any data is on the drive. This wouldn't fit on a CD or in an ISO image.

    Therefore, where did you save the backup image you made? Look for a file that is at least 3GB in size and let us know where it is.
     
  6. sbolton

    sbolton Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Posts:
    12
    I have an ISO file and I have another file but I don't know what type it is. One is called "My Backup" and the other ISO file is labeled "Steve's Backup on May 8, 2009.

    They are both stored on an internal hard drive that is separate from my C drive.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks

    sb
     
  7. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2007
    Posts:
    3,335
    Location:
    Florida - USA
    It would also help us to help you if you say what the sizes of those two files are.
     
  8. sbolton

    sbolton Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Posts:
    12
    The ISO file is 65.1 MB. The other file is 35.0 mb.

    Thanks.

    sb
     
  9. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2007
    Posts:
    3,335
    Location:
    Florida - USA
    The ISO file looks like it could be for making the True Image Rescue CD. The other file is way too small to be a full backup of a Windows installation. So it is impossible to say what kind of backup you did to produce that 35mb file.

    At this point I think you would be best served if you read the Beginner's Guide that can be found in the signature links by GroverH in his message #3.
     
  10. sbolton

    sbolton Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Posts:
    12
    Ok, I will read that.

    When I installed Acronis my system had just been reformatted. I wanted a true image of the operating system and that is what I am sure I burned.

    I look through a huge pdf manual and it appears that a person can get a disc (boxed version) of Acronis True Image. Anyone know where? Thanks.

    I will read the beginners guide.

    thanks

    Steve Bolton.
     
  11. sbolton

    sbolton Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Posts:
    12
    How can you tell what is a *.tib file?

    SB
     
  12. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Posts:
    2,591
    Location:
    State College, Pennsylvania
    ".tib" stands for "True Image Backup". It is the file extension used by True Image when making a backup file, just like ".txt" is the extension for text files and ".doc" is the extension for Word documents. For example, if you give your backup file the name "My Backup" True Image will append the extension ".tib" to the name and the complete file name will become "My Backup.tib".

    *.tib:
    The "*" is called a wildcard and in computer lingo it means "anything". So "*.tib" means "any True Image backup file".
     
  13. sbolton

    sbolton Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Posts:
    12
    Maybe I should start a new thread, but it appears I have a lot to learn. I am wondering where I can buy the "boxed version" of Acronis True Image.

    Also, my big goal is to get so I can re-load my C drive entirely (my operating system) I keep "My Documents on an external hard drive.

    I assume this is quite doable. I did print the beginner's material but I can't read it for awhile.

    Thanks

    SB
     
  14. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Posts:
    2,405
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    You can buy the boxed version from most any recognized computer store or online. Also check such as
    http://www.newegg.com
    http://www.ugr.com
    http://www.acronis.com

    Unless your computer is not bootable, there is no real advantage to buying the boxed version over the download.

    Unless you have uninstalled your trial version, you can input your newly purchased license number into the already installed trial version without downloading anything more.

    Once you have purchased your license and input it into your trial copy so your have a licensed copy, then create a new Rescue CD and you will have the same as the boxed Retail copy. You can also download the official user guide from

    http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/download/docs/
     
  15. sbolton

    sbolton Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Posts:
    12
    Great. Thanks for the advice. I watched a couple of YouTube videos on True Image and they are quite helpful.

    One last question. I want to be able to return to a very pristine version of Windows XP Pro. My IT guy said that True Image will back up the bad stuff too (virus').

    How do you know when it is ok to make a True Image. Should I reformat my computer again and then make the True Image?

    Thanks so much.

    sb
     
  16. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Posts:
    2,405
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Yes, TI image backups takes a picture of your drive. Whatever is on the drive is captured and that includes any virus. TI cannot pick & choose. It is an imaging tool which includes everything.
    Your backup strategy should not be a single one time backup. It is best if it includes regular or at least random backups as your system changes. If you have a full disk backup (as discussed in my guides), you will be able to restore your system back to an earlier time or restore to a new disk if your drive fails. The retention of prior backups should begin with those you have already completed. The TI Home version does not promote restoring an image to a new computer with different hardware configurations (another topic).

    Certainly, a new install of Windows will give you a more pristene system in which to create a backup. Many people use this as a starting point. You should make also check all your hard drives for disk errors. This should be done at least at the very beginning of your backups strategy and then check randomly as you go forward. Disk errors can prevent getting a good backup or being able to get a good restore to a less than optimum hard drive.

    The one mistake most often made by a new user is to make regular backups but never performs a test restore to make sure their restore will function when it is really needed. Too often, they find they are unable to a restore when it needed the most. The prevention tool is test your system at the beginning by performing actual restores to a spare disk.

    If you have some reading time, here are some links which you should help to build your understanding of TrueImage Home.

    Acronis User manuals available from this link
    http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/download/docs/

    Acronis® True Home Videos of Version 11
    Although this is an old versin, the concept is still the same.
    http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/video10/

    Rescue CD plays an important role
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showpost.php?p=1424595&postcount=3

    Tatou rambling on--one large drive with many externals
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showpost.php?p=1383642&postcount=13

    Acronis v11 -how to create rescue Cd
    http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/download/docs/

    Clone or Restore using Resize comparison
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showpost.php?p=1299861&postcount=9

    When/Why do people mount
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=154735

    TrueImageHome "Partition or Disk to Restore" Screen
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=218533

    Best way for making functioning images
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=1047306

    Recommend backup scheme for photos, music 32 replies--2 pages
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=164175
     
  17. sbolton

    sbolton Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Posts:
    12
    Thank you for the helpful information.

    How do you check the hard drive for errors? By defragging?

    SB
     
  18. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2005
    Posts:
    4,751
    To comprehensively check a HD use chkdsk X: /r
    Replace the X in the command with the drive letter of the partition being tested. If you have 3 partitions on 1 physical HD then you have to run the command 3 times, once for each partition.

    I usually (in XP), do Start Run and type CMD in the run box. This will bring up a "DOS-style" Window where you can enter the chkdsk command. Note that the computer will tell you it can't run it on partition C unless the machine is rebooted. The chkdsk report for C will be found in the Event Viewer which is under Administrative Tools. Look for an entry around the reboot time entered by "Winlogon"; this will give the chkdsk report. Kind of silly, but that's where it goes.

    Defragging moves the data on the disk to make it as contiguous as possible. That means that all the sectors used for a file are located adjacent to each other so the heads don't have to seek all over the platter to find the parts of a file. This should make the disk system run more efficiently.

    I don't think the MS defragger checks the disk before defragging but it might. The safest way would probably be:
    Delete any files you are certain you don't want.
    Run chkdsk to fix any HD file system problems
    Do the defrag.

    Note that TI is not a disk diagnostic program and it assumes your disk is working properly and the file system is in good shape. Having said that, minor file system problems typically do not cause TI any problems.

    This is my personal opinion and not everyone will agree. I have made images of clean base systems before with the idea of having a starting point if I should want to reinstall again. The reality, in my case, is that they rarely, if ever, get used. My hardware changes, too many Windows updates, too much new software and updates so I'd spend a lot of time maintaining the "clean start image". I find that the most current image is the one I want and nothing else.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2009
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.