Backup needs a boot from CD?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by JBedforth, Mar 24, 2007.

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  1. JBedforth

    JBedforth Registered Member

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    Second basic question - I have just bought this product (and an external HDD) and run full backups of my laptop and desktop. Reading all the advice here and elsewhere, it seems the recommendation is to backup having booted from the CD rather than from the up-and-running system. Is this important (should I re-backup from the boot CD?)...

    TIA!!
     
  2. farmerlee

    farmerlee Registered Member

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    I've been using ATI 10 for a while now and have had no problems backing up from a running system to an external usb hdd. It seems to work fine imo.
     
  3. JBedforth

    JBedforth Registered Member

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    That's good news - thanks for the reply (I guess the backups actually work too!? :) )
     
  4. MTX

    MTX Registered Member

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    The Rescue CD is important if your hard disk crash.
     
  5. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Many many users create their backups using the Rescue CD exclusively! They feel there is less change of Windows interference, However, True Image was made to create quality snapshots from within Windows--so take your choice. Perhaps a mix of both would be prudent.

    However!!! The TI Rescue CD is a very important part of your backup procedures. Should you want or need to restore or replace your system drive, your need to use this CD for that purpose. You need to know whether the CD will function as promised.

    1. Bootup using the CD and do a "validate" on several of your backup archives.

    2. Create a new backup from within the CD to make sure you can do backups from within the CD. You may reach a situation where you want to create a backup and Windows is not functioning. Don't forget to validate the backup.

    3. Use the MOUNT option and mount your backup. This creates a additional temporary drive with a drive letter assigned. Find a few files from within this drive and copy them to another folder--just for the experience of doing so. This function is for Windows mode.

    4. Many users feel that you need the assurance of having done some restores from the Rescue CD. A spare drive is best often used for this purpose--as a first test.

    5. The time to get prepared for a disaster is before the disaster strikes.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2007
  6. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    As a minimum, you should validate your backups (as least once unless your hardware changes) from the rescue CD. If your backup does not pass the validation test from the rescue CD you will not be able to restore your Active Partition (e.g. C: drive) should you wish to do so.

    There is no short cut here. All I can see in this thread is users brimming with confidence because their backups work. Ouch. Wise up people. Do a Linux validation and if you can, do a rehearsal restoration to a spare drive - ideally of the same type as the source drive.

    F.
     
  7. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    It's interesting. People ask if they can trust Acronis(could also read any imaging product). Then there is the advice, to try restoring to a spare drive.

    If you aren't actually willing to restore to your system, you don't actually trust your imaging program. Yes for sure the first time you do it, besure you do have some means of recovering should it fail. It could be a recovery CD, any number of ways. But the only way you will fullly trust your imaging program is to restore to your system. First time you will hold your breath, but after a while, it will become second nature, and then you will trust your program.

    Pete
     
  8. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Pete & foghorne,
    I could not agree more. I have re-phrased one of my statements in my earlier posting. The newbies do have to start somewhere with their testing. I would hate to screw up my system on my first restore. For many, it is easier safer to do some small steps before you do big steps. Such things as restoring a few files; then a data partition; then restore the full drive onto a spare drive.

    After successes in the smaller steps, then the newuser should have less reluctance to restore their regular partitions--as needed.

    As you state, it is not a real test until you restore your system. My comfort level improves with each restore (of which there has been many) but I am always aware that the un-expected can occur--which often causes one to make corrections.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2007
  9. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

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    Hello JBedforth,

    Thank you for choosing Acronis Disk Backup Software.

    We are sorry for the delayed response.

    Please note that as it was mentioned Acronis True Image allows you to create backups on a "live" system without any problems. The following thread <Which way to backup?> can be useful. It contains the descriptions of Acronis True Image backup creation technology.

    Also, as other Forum members noted, the main purpose of Acronis True Image Bootable Rescue Media is to provide you with ability to restore the system if the operating system won't load for some reason. Thus, booted your computer from Acronis True Image Bootable Rescue Media you can run standalone version of Acronis True Image to restore damaged system.

    In addition, Acronis True Image Bootable CD provides most of the basic functionality of Acronis True Image such as back up, restore, clone etc. Therefore, if it is more suitable for you, you can use Acronis True Image Bootable CD to perform these operations.

    Thank you.
    --
    Aleksandr Isakov
     
  10. JBedforth

    JBedforth Registered Member

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    Thanks for all the advice guys. From what has been said, backup and restore from the bootable CD is the best way to go from the confidence-inspiring pov if nothing else, but the software should facilitate backup from the running OS without difficulty and just as efficiently.

    The only fear I would have is if the USB external HDD was not accessible from the booted CD (thus removing the paddle from the boat whilst in that creek).

    More importantly does backing up from the running OS rather than the booted CD IMPLY that the USB drive won't be available when restoring from the booted CD? I'll have a play and see. What fun o_O Thanks again.

    (PS: Grover, whilst I'm here, if you mount an image file, should it bring in all the "split" images from the same backup thus making all the backed-up folders and files available in the mounted drive letter?)
     
  11. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Mounting:

    The mounting function will create an additional drive and assign a new drive letter to the drive as it appeared on the day of your selected backup.

    One easy method is to Right click any one of the .tib volumes which comprise the set. Acronis treats all the files within that archive as one backup set. It does not matter which particular .tib file (volume) you select. Any selection will produce the same next "Image Selection" screen.

    Once, you have made an archive selection, Acronis displays the "Archive Date Selection" screen. On this screen will list the date of each incremental/differential associated with the archive. It is your selection on this screen that will dictate what is displayed during the mount operation.

    For example lets assume:
    ..day 1=full backup
    ..day 2=incremental-1
    ..day 3=incremental-2
    ..day 4=differential

    Thus....on the "Archive Date Selection" screen:
    ..selecting day 1, mount will replicate your drive as seen on day-1
    ..selecting day 2, mount will replicate your drive as seen on day-2
    ..selecting day 3, mount will replicate your drive as seen on day-3
    ..selecting day 4, mount will replicate your drive as seen on day-4

    When finished viewing or copying, then you must close the Explorer window on the new drive.
    Afterwards, reopen Windows Explorer and Right click on the mounted drive letter and choose the Dismount option.

    Repeat the entire mounting/dismounting procedure should you want to view drive as it was on a different day.

    Review image R-4 "Archive Date Selection" example as displayed in the Restore Beginnner's Guide--link below.
     
  12. JBedforth

    JBedforth Registered Member

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    Grover - Thank you for taking the time to produce that comprehensive reply; hits the nail on the head. It is detail like that which deosn't always leap from the official documentation and I really appreciate your effort to answer such a basic question.....
    Best regards
    James
     
  13. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Not all all!

    Using the Rescue CD to create a backup to your external drive should assure you that any of your backup are accessible from the external drive. Its usually none or all.

    If yes, then you should be able to count on it always being seen. If you get another drive, then another test is needed to confirm it also is seen by the Rescue CD.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2007
  14. JBedforth

    JBedforth Registered Member

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    That is good news - starting to feel more secure now!
     
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