Backup file fragmentation

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by allserene, Jan 6, 2007.

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  1. allserene

    allserene Registered Member

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    When i backup using acronis , i then have to go and defragment the drive holding the file - can acronis lay down a backup file that is not so badly fragmented ?
     
  2. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    Re: Acronis True Image WISH-LIST thread

    I would expect that an image file would be written via the OS filesystem and so the fragmentation is simply a consequence of the size of the file.

    I am surprised that you find it important to defragment your target drive. It might be considered important to defragment drives which are being accessed often, such as for files on the system partition - however disk backups are normally infrequently accessed and I would not expect a defragmented image file to restore significantly quicker than a fragmented one.

    F.
     
  3. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    Re: Acronis True Image WISH-LIST thread

    I believe the fragmentation of the large files might be due to compression. Not sure it's worth worrying about
     
  4. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    Re: Acronis True Image WISH-LIST thread

    AFAIK Images are made on a used sector by sector basis whereas a defragmenter looks for fragmented files.
    It is not surprising therefore that a defragger sees an image file as fragmented. It is supposed to be that way !

    Xpilot
     
  5. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    Re: Acronis True Image WISH-LIST thread

    I may have misunderstood the original post on this topic, but I thought we were talking about an image file (e.g. a .tib) not a restored image. The image therefore is just a file, and a filesystem storing it will attempt to lay it contiguously on the disk. The sectors represented in the image have no bearing on the sectors it is stored on.

    F.
     
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