Avira engine update

Discussion in 'other anti-virus software' started by trjam, Jul 6, 2011.

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  1. trjam

    trjam Registered Member

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    This is the version number of the new engine:
    AV7 7.9.6.2 / AV8-10 8.2.6.2


    The following changes were done:

    - Added: Detection for embedded flash objects in Microsoft Office Documents
    - Updated: Improved detection of exploits for Microsoft Office Documents
     
  2. Trooper

    Trooper Registered Member

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    Cool beans.
     
  3. Stefan Kurtzhals

    Stefan Kurtzhals AV Expert

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    Nothing too exciting.

    Will be much more interesting when you can read "- Added NV AI detection" in the changelog.

    But I wonder when that will be... :(

    At least I was able to detect the recent, hm, addition to Avira as TR/Trash.Gen - thanks to the help of FileAssassin. :)
     
  4. SLE

    SLE Registered Member

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    @stefan: When I read your last posts 'bout Avira I'm wondering: Have you left?
     
  5. gery

    gery Registered Member

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    yep too suspicious o_O o_O o_O
     
  6. trjam

    trjam Registered Member

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    no he hasnt.:thumb:
     
  7. trjam

    trjam Registered Member

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    Artificial Intelligence

    The need for a new paradigm for defense
    Instead of being adaptive, defense is purely reactive. In most cases it involves or essentially
    consists in limiting or foregoing some functionality. When a new attack has been
    discovered, more often than not the “security” solution consists in reducing the
    functionality. One major reason to turn toward AI, is to put an end at the present situation.
    The move from DNS to DNSSEC illustrates somewhat the problem with the present
    approach. It has improved the security of the internet. But the cost is a complicated system
    of keys, whose renewal opens the door for scenarios of failures, which did not exist before.
    With DNSSEC the internet is less vulnerable to malicious exploitations of the weaknesses of
    the DNS system, but the use of a cumbersome system of authentication for all the servers
    involved does not make it more reliable.
    The world of web applications is growing fast in importance and size, but in parallel it raises
    increasing concerns about security, which will not be solved adequately within the present
    paradigm of defense.
    Same Origin Policy (SOP) is another example of the “old-fashioned" approach to
    cybersecurity. SOP (a policy adopted by most browsers) was designed to prevent the
    possibility that scripts originating from other than one site can be run on a web site
    (admittedly this has potentially dangerous consequences). Not only attacks such CSRF show
    that it is possible to circumvent the same origin policy, but that policy blocks other
    functionalities, which could be useful. In the words of Douglas Crockford: “[The Same
    Origin Policy] allows dangerous things while preventing useful ones”. The way out of that
    dilemma may lie in a much more intelligent defense.
    In the case of CSRF, the proposed defenses are either in the website (alerting the system
    administrator that the website in its present design allows CSRF attacks) or in the client side.
    Typically the solutions suggested either reduce the functionality of the website, changes the
    protocol of trusted session by requiring more authentication, or (as is the case with request
    rodeo) offers a tool which limits partially the access to websites from the clients. In other
    Intrusion Detection Systems
    32
    words, the solutions tend to make the protocols safer by making them more cumbersome
    and the protection often involves a reduction of functionality, i.e. it goes exactly against the
    logic, which underlies the success of the internet.
    What and AI-based approach potentially offer is a way to address the multiple threats
    associated with cybersecurity, without having to rely on an increasing list of changing rules
    or security procedures for diagnostic and recovery procedures. If security tools were expert
    systems, which could not be abused as easily, the situation would be very different. Ideally
    they would understand what users are trying to do and make sure that this is what is
    happening. They would develop a sense of “situational awareness”, from which they would
    be able to tell malicious activity from legitimate ones. They would be able to make context
    dependent determinations.
    b. Prospects of AI in cybersecurity
    If AI means introducing intelligence in an automated system, there is no doubt that the
    future of cybersecurity lies in AI. But AI is at the same time an advanced field and at a very
    early stage of development.
    The limits of the possible with AI are not known. The limits of the capabilities of AI are a
    moving frontier. In a “post biological intelligence” world (P. Davies, 2010), the division
    between natural and artificial intelligence will be blurred.
    We are still far away from that world, but it is not too early to envision it. And the question
    is how should AI be introduced in the world of cybersecurity with maximum effect in the
    short term. Should we have a vision of AI-based cybersecurity as a cyber-equivalent of what
    happen with the immune system during biological evolution? I.e. of the creation over time
    of a large and complex organ inseparable from the rest of the organism? Should the first
    phase attempt to build the equivalent of a rudimentary immune system, with the vision of
    an eventual large and sophisticated one? Or should the search be more random and based
    on trying to introduce more intelligence in security tool whenever possible and wherever
    possible? In fact the two approaches differ only on paper. The immune system must have
    developed out of a random search as we are told the rest of biological evolution, leading in
    the long run to high levels of organization.
    To what extent does AI in its present state provide a framework to start building such a
    system? It is impossible and not useful here to try and describe a field like AI. On the one
    hand it is a large body of academic knowledge (Russel and Novig 2003). When it comes to
    its applications, it looks more like a vast and fragmented field. Through expert systems AI
    has found applications in numerous fields from medical diagnosis to helping manufacture
    to finance management to fault analysis to advanced optimization, and to a too limited
    extent to cybersecurity.
    Of the many techniques used in AI, when it comes to anomaly-based intrusion detection the
    techniques, which seem the most natural are either “statistics” based (Mitchell 1997) or
    “knowledge-based”(Kerkar and Srinivas 2009).
    The whole area of machine learning tends to make heavy use of statistics. The a priori caveat
    with that kind of approach in the context of intrusion detection is the possibility that the
    problem (or curse) with false positive re-emerges. If it is possible to set-up the system in
    such a way it can “reason” probabilistically (Pearl 198:cool: about events along the lines of the
    iterative Bayesian updating described previously, this problem may turn out manageable.
    Statistically based machine learning traditionally needs huge amount of data. This may turn
    problematic in many situations of interest for intrusion detection.
     
  8. Stefan Kurtzhals

    Stefan Kurtzhals AV Expert

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    I am still there.

    NV isn't such a great name. I would have named it Zoe. I like track 17 from the Caprica OST. Zoe awakens. :)
     
  9. sbcc

    sbcc Guest

    My wife's name is Zoe. She is sleeping now, but she will awaken in the morning. :D

    (We really liked BSG and the prequels, too.) :cool:
     
  10. De Hollander

    De Hollander Registered Member

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  11. SLE

    SLE Registered Member

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    Nice & better than stupid copy&paste without source!;)
     
  12. J_L

    J_L Registered Member

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    Damn thing nagged me every minute, so I've ended the process.
     
  13. RejZoR

    RejZoR Registered Member

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    Looks like AVIRA is slowly sinking into forgotten lands. No buzz around it, no amazing scores, ppl losing interest in it, staff that doesn't seem to have much inetrest in it either since their management is all messed up. They need to get things rollin', otherwise they'll sink the company...
     
  14. carat

    carat Guest

    +1 :thumb:
     
  15. Osaban

    Osaban Registered Member

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    Well, you should rejoice at this prospect, Avast can only benefit from it. If I were you I'd be careful about your predictions under your breath, a company with a 100 million+ membership doesn't sink so easily.
     
  16. Motherroad

    Motherroad Registered Member

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    Agree. The long term users of Avira are not going anywhere untill the protection becomes real bad. Just do not see this happening. I have Beta tested all the new AV software and am happy to be back with Avira.
     
  17. RejZoR

    RejZoR Registered Member

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    100 million free users don't really mean anything... and even if they don't sink right now, they will next year since there won't be enough subscribers...
     
  18. Kerodo

    Kerodo Registered Member

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    I agree... I think they're on their way down...
     
  19. SweX

    SweX Registered Member

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    Maybe Avira is currently being managed by the same people that crashed the Greece economy :rolleyes:
     
  20. Cloud

    Cloud Registered Member

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    No...it is definitely Symantec. Look at what happened to PCTools.

    I feel bad for Avira though. :(
     
  21. tgell

    tgell Registered Member

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    It only gets better.

    http://www.avira.com/en/avira-searchfree-toolbar

    Anybody here know what the privacy policy of Ask.com is.

    http://sp.ask.com/en/docs/about/privacy.shtml
     
  22. Trespasser

    Trespasser Registered Member

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    I hate to disagree with Kerodo, since I've known him on this forum for so long, but I don't think Avira is going anywhere. I've changed my mind set about this Ask toolbar thing and it's a non-issue. Norton includes it, other companies do as well. FYI, they've changed the AntiVir Personal 10 SP2 update to not having the toolbar and make Ask your preferred search engine checked now. That is a step in the right direction IMO. Everyone flubs up every once in a while but that doesn't mean you can't recover from it or they're down for the count.

    Later...

    Bob
     
  23. Osaban

    Osaban Registered Member

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    Opinion makers at Wilders have no impact whatsoever in the big picture, this is no television reaching millions simultaneously. Besides if 100 million mean nothing for Avira then the tide could turn all of a sudden for Avast too. I personally don't give a damn if they go bust (good for you though) but why suddenly is Avira becoming a disastrous company here at Wilders it's a bit of a mystery.
     
  24. Kerodo

    Kerodo Registered Member

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    I hope you're right Trespasser.....
     
  25. RejZoR

    RejZoR Registered Member

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    It could affect avast! just as well. But for now they aren't making any idiotic decisions like AVIRA does... besides, i have no wish for AVIRA to go bust even though i'm in the avast! camp. Competition is healthy and AVIRA was one tough competition. With emphasis on "was"...
     
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