anyone use winoverboost?

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by GUI_Tex, Feb 6, 2006.

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  1. GUI_Tex

    GUI_Tex Registered Member

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    What do you think of it? I have

    windows xp home
    448 mb's of ram
    2.8 gb's processor
    80 gb's of harddrive
    2800+ amd anthlon xp
    1.5 mb internet connection

    will this vastly improve my machine, as of speed and effiecency?
     
  2. GUI_Tex

    GUI_Tex Registered Member

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    Re: anyone use winoverboast?

    i dont notice much of a difference in performance, maybe slowerness.. the connection seems to be faster though.. i think. :(
     
  3. Bubba

    Bubba Updates Team

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    Re: anyone use winoverboast?

    Do you have a link for this winoverboast ?

    A Google search does not even recognize that name :doubt:

    Edit:
    Changed thread Title to reflect actual software in question.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2006
  4. GUI_Tex

    GUI_Tex Registered Member

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  5. NexusHelm

    NexusHelm Registered Member

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    Re: anyone use winoverboast?

    Doubtful for machine speed. Ram defragmenting/optimization is one of these big myths, apparently 'optimizing' ram just slows down your machine.
     
  6. hollywoodpc

    hollywoodpc Registered Member

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    Re: anyone use winoverboast?

    Yeah yeah yeah . I have heard all about how it is a myth . Yeah yeah yeah .
    I use it . It tends to speed things up a bit . Nice tool . I guess everybody has differing things happen on different machines . Try it . It should not hurt anything . And IF it slows you down , which I kinda doubt , remove it . Simple
     
  7. Close_Hauled

    Close_Hauled Registered Member

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    Re: anyone use winoverboast?


    I concure. These RAM optimization programs are nothing but a myth. Every magazine that has tested the has debunked them.

    I build high speed data acquisition systems for a living. These systems collect hundreds of channels of data at a time, each at a much higher data rate than your Internet connection rate. Imagine gigabytes in just a few seconds being transfered to your hard drive.

    If you want a task on your computer to run faster, you simply have to make as many clock cycles available to that task as you can. You have to analyze it and see what affects that task the most. So the real question should be, "What can I do to make this task faster?"
     
  8. Alec

    Alec Registered Member

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    Yeah, RAM defragmentation/optimization is a myth.
    1. Fragmentation of RAM is not a concern because you have a virtual memory manager that presents a logically uniform address space to each process and hides the physical RAM allocation from each user mode process. Physical RAM useage is essentially never contiguous. All of the physical RAM is consumed by pages dedicated to various disparate processes. Nor is physical continuity even a concern as with a harddrive because RAM useage is essentially fully randomly accessible whereas a read/write from a harddrive can be optimized if made contiguous due to the measurable delay associated with head placement.

    2. Optimization isn't a concern with RAM either, since that is the role of the virtual memory manager and the paging algorithms. Memory utilities that force the clearing of physical RAM are simply forcing out pages that are in use to the harddrive's virtual page file. Having "free" memory pages may allow a process to load up somewhat quicker (since the VMM does not have to worry about swapping out pages in order to free memory), but this is at the expense of: 1) the time it takes to "pre-clear" those memory pages; 2) the added time it takes to swap in pages that may have been needlessly paged out; and 3) the added CPU time and memory resources spent on the additional "system optimization" process itself. The VMM is the more efficient mechanism because it only swaps pages as required and it does so in a manner that retains the most frequently used pages in physical RAM so that they are not needlessly swapped back and forth, and also because it is already a mandatory process/thread that exists.
     
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