Any bugs in this new release - ESET Smart Security 4.2.58 because

Discussion in 'ESET Smart Security' started by newbie2247, Aug 2, 2010.

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  1. newbie2247

    newbie2247 Registered Member

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    I still have release 4.2.40.0 and the firewall is giving me heart attacks, fits, frenzies and a MAJOR letdown, GROSS disappointment with ESET.

    I wrote to them and described in detail what my firewall problem was - megatons of these messages daily:

    Incorrect IP packet checksum
    Incorrect TCP packet checksum
    Detected ARP cache poisoning
    Identical IP addresses detected in network

    I even filled out one of the forms on the ESET site as well as several letters to Customer Support. That was over a month ago. Can you believe it? Not only am I very, very sad :( about the very poor customer support but I am out of my mind with worry about these entries in my firewall log o_O - they're in bright red ink - a red flag if I ever saw one. It means pay attention, something is very wrong here, no?

    I very much would like to remedy this ASAP. I don't want to see these entries anymore, ever. I've already done the complete and total uninstall and reinstall. Makes no difference whatsoever.

    What to do? Can anybody who cares more that ESET please help or advise me? o_O



    Thanks and have a great day!!!
     
  2. HealingStargate

    HealingStargate Registered Member

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    I would upgrade to latest version 4.2.58. I have had no problems with this version and I simply installed it over the last. (Save settings)

    KOR-
     
  3. tomi

    tomi Registered Member

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    Hello,

    do you use router, Wi-Fi, or other local NAT device?
     
  4. HealingStargate

    HealingStargate Registered Member

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    No router or Wi-Fi, just one computer connected to high speed access.
    KOR-


     
  5. newbie2247

    newbie2247 Registered Member

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    No Wi-fi, no clue what a NAT thingy is, Yes, we do have a router which totally separates our 2 computers completely from each other. For umpteen years it has never been a source of any kind of problem whatsoever. But what do I know?

    So I should upgrade then?

    Nobody here in this forum has posted about any problems or bugs?

    (Just want to be sure because I received this problem I now have from doing an upgrade. I was going along just fine, happy as a lark. Stopped in here for a visit, found out there was an upgrade, did it and WHAM!!!! A brick wall right in the face.)

    Now I have shell shock and am afraid of upgrades, LOL.
     
  6. tomi

    tomi Registered Member

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    Please follow instructions in this article: http://kb.eset.com/esetkb/index?page=content&id=SOLN969

    These attacks occur between the client and DNS/ARP authority and are not a risk for users with a NAT device. Deslecting the options will not pose a risk to users with a router, Wi-Fi, or other local NAT device.
     
  7. newbie2247

    newbie2247 Registered Member

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    Thank you so very much. What a big help.

    You looked closely at all 4 of those log entries? Because one said something about my address and a network. I am not part of any network. I am a home user.

    So my router is considered one of those Nat Device thingy's then?
     
  8. taeke

    taeke Registered Member

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    Since you ask, I do. Never-ending start-up scan in the *58.3 version. Seems like I'm one of 2 suffering from that though, so you might have more luck than me :cool:
     
  9. AJStevens

    AJStevens Registered Member

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    Some info you might find useful, or not:

    A network is group of 2 or more network devices, computers are network devices if they are connected by an Ethernet cable or Wireless connection.

    You will see Windows indicate connections as LAN and WLAN, these stand for Local Area Network and Wireless Local Area Network.

    As a home user, what you'll have is a "Workgroup", whereas companies (should!) have a proper "Domain".

    Often Workgroup/Domain is confused with Network, don't worry.

    For a network to exist, all the computers need to have an "IP Address", similiar to a telephone number or house number that we find other people by.
    It's important that only one computer on the network has that IP address or you get messages such as "Identical IP addresses detected in network" and this can cause network issues for the computers affected. However, in most networks the assigning of IP address to network devices is not done manually on each PC (though it can be and this is usually where this accidental duplication happens) but via a single master device, typically a Server or a router.

    I'm guessing you're Router is a most likely a Broadband Router supplied to you by your ISP (Internet Service Provider), as a home user these will 99.9% of the time be a NAT device (Network Address Translation), simply speaking it allows the sharing of the internet connection with all the network devices on your network. Specifically, you ISP will assign you one IP address your network can use to access the internet, without the router doing NAT, only one PC could access the internet, this shares the single IP with all your devices.

    In a simple decription, if a PC needs a webpage when you open Google, it'll ask the router which will fetch it on behalf of the PC, and supply it to it.

    You're router will also likely be a DHCP server, giving all your network devices IP addresses. Although, from the sound of that 4th message, perhaps it isn't, or perhaps it is, but you've also manually set one of your PCs, you should unset it (Start, Control Panel, Network Connections, LAN Connection, properties, IP Address, set everything to DHCP), you might need some help with that part though.

    Important note, "Network Devices" can include games consoles, Blu-ray players, media streamers and anything with a network connection.

    Finally, being an ISP Broadband supplied router, I'd be surprised if it wasn't also a Firewall, this keeps hackers out of your network, and allows your computers inside to access the internet.

    Usually, home users first discover NAT when trying to play games online with others and experience problems "Hosting" games or joining other multiplayer games online. Or when they buy a media streamer and wish to access their Sky/Cable TV over the internet (Google "Slingshot" and the like).

    Detected ARP cache poisoning - Again, this isn't as serious as it sounds, many ISP routers try to "trick" your computer in telling it that "http://myrouter" will take it to the settings page of your router, this is perfectly safe, but if you weren't behind a router someone might be trying to tell your computer that www.bbc.co.uk is actually http://www.fakebbc.co.uk where they might try to trick you into revealing your identity or information.

    Identical IP addresses detected in network - Don't panic, but if one or two network devices aren't functioning perfectly, it's likely they're fighting over the same IP address, try to ensure everything is set to DHCP if you're using an ISP broadband router as it'll likely be doing DHCP for your network.

    Incorrect IP packet checksum & Incorrect TCP packet checksum - It's likely these are a result of the last error, ensure the duplicate IP situation is resolved and see if you continue to get these errors. Again don't panic, but it's an indication that things could be better on your home network.
     
  10. newbie2247

    newbie2247 Registered Member

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    What a mother lode of very helpful information. Thank you soooooooooooo much.

    Here is my understanding of things, what I have learned and happened after reading your FANTASTIC and home user-friendly easy to understand language. (you don't get that often unfortunately - everyone assumes you understand all the acronyms and techie language, HA!):

    We have Verizon (ISP) Fios and our router does or can act as a firewall. We both have Windows Vista Premium Home Edition but only I use ESET (I'm the smart one :D ). There are 2 networks and both are private. I am network #2. The Network map goes like this: OWNER (there are 2), then Switch, then Gateway and finally Internet. All that is gobbledygook Greek to me but you probably understand it.

    After reading your reply, I went right to work. Did not get far probably because of my O/S? You think? Do tell if you know please.

    Anyway, What I have in my Control Panel is NETWORK + SHARING (rather than what you wrote), I went in there and there was no LAN option but there was ACCESS and under that CONNECTION. I went into the latter which is "local area connection". In there I selected View Status, then Properties, then Properties again. There is where I had to stop because from then on absolutely nothing resembled your suggestions re: DCHP - which I noticed was ENABLED, for whatever that's worth. What I found instead of my IP address and the ability to set everything to DCHP was a tab labeled RPC - remote procedure call service. No clue what to do now. The End.

    Did I express my adventures well? Did anything I reveal explain the reason for me getting these firewall log entries? Truly, I very much wish to know.

    I did take Tomi's advice. Thank You very much Tomi :) Now we shall see if the entries stop. Since I am NOT a DOMAIN, is it actually really necessary for me to Uncheck the DNS poisoning attack detection option? If not, I'd much rather leave it checked. Please let me know if you guys don't' mind.

    Again, many thanks and if any questions, ask away.
     
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