Another storage question!

Discussion in 'hardware' started by ratchet, Nov 26, 2012.

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  1. ratchet

    ratchet Registered Member

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    Please read this first!
    Since I built this PC in May, in keeping with the recommendation of having more than one backup method, I've also been using Windows 7 backup to an external USB HD that happens to be only 3.5" in width. I'd like use one of the internal USB ports and mount this drive in a bay. The one glitch though is when I plug it in the case ports W7 immediately asks if I want to backup, which is nice but not if I have it permanently connected. Is there a way I could turn the automatic nag off? Thank you!
     
  2. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    o_O You say that as though that is not normal. 3.5" is BY FAR the most common drive size - and the most common drive bay size, along with the larger 5.25 bays used for optical drives.

    Why do you want to connect this drive internally using USB? The drive is most likely using an SATA (or EIDE/PATA) connection internally to the enclosure. If me, I would remove the drive from the enclosure and install it via SATA or EIDE as a "normal" internal drive. Installing an enclosure internally in a PC is not the best way to go.
     
  3. ratchet

    ratchet Registered Member

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    I do realize what you are stating. My point is many ext HD's are rather large compared to this Maxtor (Seagate now I guess). As to opening it I'm not sure I would not ruin it!
     
  4. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    The vast majority of hard drives are either 3.5 inches wide (used mostly in PCs) and 2.5 inches (like SSDs) wide (used mostly in notebooks). Other than maybe needing a adapter mounting bracket like this to make it physically fit, there's nothing really to do. Or maybe one of these.

    How would you physically secure the enclosure once inside the PC? Since PCs need to be periodically inspected for dust buildup, you cannot have it sitting inside loose, where it may bounce around and damage something.

    Depending on how the enclosure is put together, it may be a challenge opening the enclosure, but once inside, the actual hard drive should connect like a normal drive in a normal PC case.

    I would advise against having something loose inside a PC case.
     
  5. ratchet

    ratchet Registered Member

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    What I meant was the outer measurements of the HD. e.g.
    7.01" x 4.59" x 1.42" are the measurements of a WD 3.5" ext HD drive. The Maxtor portable ext HD fits in my drive bays as I only have one of the two racks that came with my case (I built this PC) in it, so I was able to verify that it fit it in one of the bays of the rack that isn't in the case. All of which is a moot point as I discovered it is quite easy to remove the actual 2.5" drive from the Maxtor and will go with SATA to SATA as you suggested so thank you!
    On another note, rather than use the 2.5" adapters, I secured my 2.5" SSD C drive with velcro. I have cleaned my filters several times so I've been in the case and trust me it is a rock solid method.
     
  6. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    I know what you mean. But what I keep trying to tell you is these are all industry standard sizes. And if you need to put a 2.5 in a 3.5 slot, adapters (for mounting, power, and data) are readily available.

    No they aren't. Those are the measurements of the external enclosure. The drive inside is a standard size.
     
  7. ratchet

    ratchet Registered Member

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    I keep trying to tell you "I know that". What I didn't realize was you could easily open a commercial external HD case without damaging it or voiding a warranty. I knew also if the actual HD failed and wanted to try it in a different enclosure then it didn't really matter how you got into the case as long as you didn't damage the HD itself. My original point was that the ex HD (including the case) that I've been referencing was still small enough to fit in a bay. Even though it is probably a 2.5" drive in there, the case still might have been to wide for the bay just like the example I gave, i.e. a form factor 3.5" WD drive in a case that is 4.59" wide. I also built a USB 3.0 to SATA III external portable drive using a 60gb SSD and USB 3 to SATA case. With Paragon backup I back up in less than 3.5 seconds and restore in less than 5. SSD to SSD. Only point is I know what an enclosure and drive is! This Maxtor ext HD is used for W7's built in backup utility, which is quite good actually.
     
  8. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Yes, but then you say,
    . I am not the one confused here.

    As for installing the whole enclosure inside the PC case using velcro, that is not something I would recommend.

    As for warranties - it might void the warranty of the enclosure. You will have to read the warranty for that specific device. That said, enclosures are meant to be used 'externally' to the computer they are attached to. So installing the entire enclosure inside the PC case is not expected, and likely not in accordance to the enclosure's instructions - and that may void the warranty too.
     
  9. Keatah

    Keatah Registered Member

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    Heat is going to be an issue. Most external drives are running on marginal convective & radiative cooling. But you are most certainly welcome to try and see how long the disk lasts.
     
  10. Sir paranoids

    Sir paranoids Registered Member

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    just buy a 1000gig hdd or bigger , they only cost like $90.
    why bother with the external.

    as well i don't see why you need to stick a external drive in your box,out side the box or in changes nothing.

    imho keep it as is,might i add as well that a high quality add in usb card will probably give you 2x times more bandwidth or better speed vs integrated , if you can find one that is.
    integrated anything blows more often then not performance wise as well its more based in software then hardware meaning ram+cpu vampire.
    theirs nothing quite like full hardware devices though the trade off is their cost.
    as is often the case you get what you pay for.

    e-sata is really the way to go though for external drives in this day and age.
     
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