Another RAM question for x64 W7 system!

Discussion in 'hardware' started by ratchet, Jan 22, 2013.

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  1. ratchet

    ratchet Registered Member

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    It currently has 8gb of (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) RAM. I purposely built it with 1600 since that is the fastest RAM, less over clocking as I'm not interested in OC. The CPU is an Ivy Bridge 3570K and the C drive a Kingston 120 gb HyperX SSD. In other words the components are quite "fast". I never bothered with a video card as the Intel integrated 4000 graphics are considered very good and I never game. Overall use is actually pretty benign, however, would there be any sense in adding 8gb more of RAM? I'm not sure I ever even use all eight now.
     
  2. nosirrah

    nosirrah Malware Fighter

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    What do you use the system for?

    On the off chance you do actually need more ram I would look into your motherboard to see if it supports XMP. If it does you could go for 2 * 8 of DDR3 2133 for a nice speed boost at the same time (+ 33% more memory bandwidth). XMP is not an OC BTW, this is a structured system for running ram beyond jedec specifications without any need to tinkering in BIOS/UEFI beyond turning XMP on. Without XMP DDR3 1600 is the limit.

    This CPU BTW (3570K) is designed to be overclocked, that is what the 'k' in 3570K means. Your chips is unlocked and you can use this to easily increase the turbo multiplier for a quick and easy speed boost. Most Ivy and Sandy 'k' chips can do 4.2 for turbo multiplier on even stock cooling without issue. On better than stock cooling 4.4 to 4.6 turbo multiplier is totally doable. I run my Sandy E chip at 4.6 turbo multiplier and since it only kicks in when I stress it 99% of the time its at stock or lower (due to power saving tech).

    Just letting you know because you spent extra on the 'k', might as well use it.
     
  3. ratchet

    ratchet Registered Member

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    It does support XMP and I am/was aware of the K designation. I wanted the 3570K for its 4000graphics and it was a steal at Micro Centers when released. I read an article that PC longevity correlates to how "hard" the system is used, e.g. over clocking shortens the component's life. That is why I'm being overly conservative. Thank you for the response!
     
  4. nosirrah

    nosirrah Malware Fighter

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    24/7 OCing especially while overvolting can do that but turbo OCing is not the same. All that does is raise the maximum speed the processor can go when it is pushed to 100%, which is not that often.

    Imagine a car that is a V6 but when you want to pass someone its a V8. Turbo OC is more or less the same thing.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2013
  5. ratchet

    ratchet Registered Member

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    Thank you!
     
  6. Noob

    Noob Registered Member

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    8GB of RAM is really a lot if you don't do any hardware intensive tasks such as . . . Gaming, Professional Work (Editing, encoding, etc.)
     
  7. ratchet

    ratchet Registered Member

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    Ah, the answer I was looking for! Thanks!
     
  8. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    I agree with Noob. 8Gb is really the "sweetspot" for 64-bit Windows. Less than 8 and performance drops, more than 8 and performance gains are marginal for the money - if noticeable at all.

    This is especially true if most of your computing tasks is done on line as the biggest bottleneck will be your network connection/Internet bandwidth - things generally out of your control.

    You are correct that integrated graphics on modern motherboards (with a current graphics oriented CPU like your i5) are more than adequate for most users (and why more and more integrated graphics PCs are being integrated into high-end home theater systems as PVRs and BluRay players).

    That said, if me, and if I had money burning a hole in my pocket, I would upgrade my graphics before bumping RAM from 8Gb to 16Gb as that will likely provide more of an over all performance boost than more RAM - in your case. However, the downside to that is graphics cards are often the most power hungry devices in our systems. So adding a graphics card often requires upgrading to more powerful PSU.
     
  9. ratchet

    ratchet Registered Member

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    More interesting information! This is the power supply I used but will stick with the integrated graphics (I think!).
     
  10. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Well, that is a reputable brand, 650W is more than most people need and to get 80 Plus Gold, it must be very efficient across a wide range of loads. So nice choice of PSUs.

    And if you are happy with it, there's no reason to upgrade. But at least if you decide you want to, your PSU will be ready.
     
  11. ratchet

    ratchet Registered Member

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    How I built my PC or you're never to old! I am a retired fish farmer (state fish culture station to be exact). Point being I am not that techy but reasonable mechanical. So January one year ago, and aware of the Ivy Bridge CPUs on the horizon I began to educate myself relative to component compatibility. Once I was pretty confident I began to gather the parts as they'd go on sale until I had everything I needed by the end of May. Memorial day weekend I spent about three hours Friday night and another three Saturday morning and it was up and running. My wife traveled to a niece's graduation that weekend and when she returned she says, "The kids said you bought an expensive computer!" I said, "No, I built one and it really wasn't very expensive!"
     
  12. Noob

    Noob Registered Member

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    I only have 6GB of RAM on my current desktop and i can barely use 2GB of RAM when doing my daily activities. The only time i need more is when i play games.
    Even though my PC never uses more than 2GB i would not recommend just having 2GB since Windows reduces RAM usage when it detects you don't have a lot available, excample . . . i used to have 2GB and my AVG RAM usage with Windows idling would be around 800-900mb, now with 6GB it uses around 1.4GB while idling.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2013
  13. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    6Gb is the "sweetspot" for motherboards with triple-channel memory architecture. 8Gb for dual channel.

    Note that 2Gb is the minimum recommended by Microsoft for 64-bit Windows. And while true, that minimum is barely enough to run Windows efficiently, let alone all your security apps, and then your favorite programs. With such a small amount, Windows is forced to use the Page File on the slow hard disk much more often.

    So my minimum recommendation is 3Gb for triple channel boards, and 4Gb for dual channel (regardless if running 32-bit or 64-bit Windows - though I think 32-bit should go away).
     
  14. Noob

    Noob Registered Member

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    Also RAM is too damn cheap nowadays. :D

    The only problem is that my MOBO uses DDR2 and when i upgraded it i had to get DDR2 which was LIKE DOUBLE the price of DDR3. :rolleyes:
     
  15. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    As you note, "current technology" RAM is cheap. Obsolete RAM is harder to find, thus more expensive. So buy more than you think you will ever need when you build/buy a new computer.
     
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