And now a cautionary tale sung by Rambling Sid Rumpo

Discussion in 'ten-forward' started by toploader, Sep 6, 2005.

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  1. toploader

    toploader Registered Member

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    Joe, he was a young cordwangler,
    Munging greebles he did go,
    And he loved a bogler's daughter
    By the name of Chiswick Flo.

    Vain she was and like a grusset
    Though her gander parts were fine,
    But she sneered at his cordwangle
    As it hung upon the line.

    So he stole a woggler's mooly
    For to make a wedding ring,
    But the Bow Street Runners caught him
    And the judge said "He will swing."

    Oh, they hung him by the postern,
    Nailed his mooly to the fence
    For to warn all young cordwanglers
    That it was a grave offence.

    There's a moral to this story,
    Though your cordwangle be poor,
    Keep your hands off other's moolies,
    For it is against the law.

    thank you Sid - i'm sure we are all the wiser for that sage advice
     
  2. Primrose

    Primrose Registered Member

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    I spent more of my time with John Peel and Home Truths..but did get bent at times with the other stuff. :D

    Well hello me dearioes....Now let us all burst forth together, so grundle your parts and away we go...

    Rambling Syd Rumpo was created by Barry Took and Marty Feldman for Round The Horne, the BBC radio comedy which ran between 1965 and 1968. Barry Took noted that their inspiration for the character came in part from real-life folk singers such as Bob Dylan and Julie Felix.

    Although at first many of the words may appear vulgar, most were in fact completely made up, the entire thing being a send up of folk songs and sea shanty's which seemed to add words unnecessarily because the author could not think of what else to put. These lyrics are guaranteed to screeve your cordwangle and bring moulies to your possett.


    here is some of the broadcasts.

    http://www.stopmessinabout.co.uk/RambSyd.htm



    'GruntFuttock' is the name of a character played by Kenneth Williams in a BBC radio comedy show in the 1960s, pre-"The Goon Show". It was a hugely smutty show headed by a quite old guy called Kenneth Horne, and was called (cleverly) Round The Horne. The GruntFuttock character was part of one of their particular scetches which illustrated a very smutty, very eccentric old Englishman in a very rural tiny seaside village (West Country, like Somerset, not like Brighton), whose favourite pasttime was something involving his 'cordwangler', and that a pretty young girl had some effect on his 'moolies'. Very puerile, but very BBC.
     

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  3. toploader

    toploader Registered Member

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    greetyngs Prymrose - y've heard it said that ramblyng Syd and the well known comedyan and raconteur Kenneth Wyllyams were one and the same person just as there are those who speculate that Wyllyam Shakespeare was Francys Bacon.

    who knows? much of the truth is lost in the mysts of tyme back in the days of steam radyo.

    Before The suggestive language of Round the Horne there was of course the Goons who were working within a strict BBC censorship policy designed to eliminate what the producers’ guide of the time referred to as “crudities” or “doubtful material”:

    ...."There is an absolute ban upon the following: jokes about lavatories, effeminacy in men, immorality of any kind, suggestive references to honeymooning couples, chambermaids, fig leaves, ladies’ underwear (eg. winter draws on), animal habits (eg. rabbits), lodgers, commercial travellers" ....

    It was their delight to get forbidden phrases past their often comparatively unworldly producers. For example, the Goons invented a character William Cobbler, whose surname is rhyming slang (in full cobbler’s awls, “balls”; it is also the source of the popular London interjection cobblers!). Another was Hugh Jampton, that is, “huge hampton”, in which the second word is also rhyming slang: “Hampton Wick” (a London placename), meaning “prick” (from it comes the common London idiom “he gets on my wick”, meaning “he annoys me intensely".
     
  4. toploader

    toploader Registered Member

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    and now without furher ado it's back to ramblyng syd - who will now give his rendition of a popular ye olde englishe sea shanty....take it away syd....

    What shall we do with the drunken nurker,
    What shall we do with the drunken nurker,
    What shall we do with the drunken nurker,
    He’s bending his cordwangle.

    Hit him in the nadgers with the bosun’s plunger,
    Slap him on the grummitt with a wrought iron lunger,
    Cuff him in the moolies with the Captain’s grungerrrrr....
    Till his bodgers dangle.
     
  5. Primrose

    Primrose Registered Member

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    :D

    Thar she goes :ninja:
     

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  6. Meltdown

    Meltdown Registered Member

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    Round the Horne was cutting edge. The Julian and Sandy sketches, broadcasting Chelsea high camp to suburban living rooms.

    Kenneth Williams was a tragic figure. He placed no value on his vast comic talent, if anything despised himself for what he considered an ignoble profession, and was tormented over his sexuality. He's often mentioned in Joe Orton's diaries, Orton portraying him as a permanently unhappy man. If I remember correctly it eventually emerged that his death was suicide, but the fact was hushed up at the time out of respect and affection for him.

    The BBC's rules for comedy make interesting reading. You can speculate over how far the Beeb was concerned with 'decency', and how far it wanted to distance itself from the music hall tradition, which ran on a staple diet of what the BBC's guidelines blacklisted. Whether the issue wasn't more to do with class, separating light entertainment for the middle classes from the vulgar amusements of the hoi polloi.

    Oh yeah, and cheers for posting the songs :D
     
  7. toploader

    toploader Registered Member

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    cheers Meltdown - we genteel english have always been rather coy when it comes to vulgarity. :)

    Back in 1914, the use of the phrase "Not bloody likely" on an English stage caused a national sensation. Upon the utterance of 'The Word', it was reported that there was "a few seconds of stunned disbelieving silence, and then hysterical laughter for at least a minute and a quarter". Contemporary newspapers delivered headlines such as 'THREATS BY DECENCY LEAGUE' and 'THEATER TO BE BOYCOTTED', and the Bishop of Woolwich reportedly proclaimed that "The Word should be banned".

    Then we had the swinging sixties kicked off by Lady Chatterley's Lover - every other page was plastered with f**k or c**t - but it was a work of literature so it was all done in the best possible taste ;)

    Of course nowadays we are very sophisticated about the use of vulgarity in modern broadcasting (especially when Bob Geldof is being interviewed) :D
     
  8. Primrose

    Primrose Registered Member

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    :D Molly will be here next week for free sessions.
     

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  9. toploader

    toploader Registered Member

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    while we are on the subject - i forgot the 1950s - era of the Great British saucy postcard....
     

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