An improved method to backup a PC

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by Xpilot, Jun 25, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Posts:
    2,318
    I have recently changed my backup routines to make them faster and more secure. I have installed a HD rack and have two drive caddies with a drive in each. These are each a main drive and are swapped before making a restore.
    Whole drive images are scheduled to be made to the slave drive. No validations are run. After the imaging is complete the Recovery CD is inserted and the HDs are swapped. Now the computer is booted in recovery mode and the latest image is restored to the newly inserted HD.
    So this is what I now have ; Two identical HDs, one in the computer and the other safe and separate in its caddy. In addition there is a set of backup images stored on the slave drive. These have not been validated but, much better than that, they have each been PROVED by actually doing a restore.
    On my PC the time taken to swap the hard drives and do a restore including the bootime is actually less than that taken when running a validation, which in itself, is no guarantee that a restore will work when you really need it.
    In the event of a real HD failure or corruption all I have to do is swap the HD out and I am up and running again in less than 3 minutes. Testing and trialing can be done in complete safety.
    I hope the above can be of some help.

    Xpilot
     
  2. tronic592001

    tronic592001 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Posts:
    164
    Location:
    Wales uk
    What if your motherboard goes downo_O
    :ninja:
     
  3. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Posts:
    2,318
    My backup stratergy is to backup my main hard drive. If my motherboard goes South I would get a replacement. Note that as only one of the main hard drives is connected at any one time the other one would survive any electrical or other disaster that might affect the rest of the hardware.

    Do you have a special way of safeguarding a motherboard?

    Xpilot
     
  4. tronic592001

    tronic592001 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Posts:
    164
    Location:
    Wales uk
    Xpilot

    well not sure but what is the price of a new motherboard compared to a new system?

    And how can you protect your motherboard?
     
  5. Allen L.

    Allen L. Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2004
    Posts:
    335
    Location:
    -Close-
    Now this is ridiculous! You can't protect everything from all unknown happening. Good grief! There are redundant ways to protect the motherboard issue...just built yourself 4 identical computers and configure them the exact same way with all the same parts and then place them in 4 separate locations and then do as the OP stated in his post as to the hard drive switching, and configure each the same. Then rent 4 safety deposit boxes in 4 separate banks and put one, or even more hard drives in each box.

    If they all go "down" because a earth sized meteorite hits the earth, you won't have to worry about the darn motherboard issue, or anything else now would you?

    Do you see where your post in leading?? To complete insanity. Let's get back to reality for the common user, can we?

    Allen o_O o_O o_O
     
  6. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Posts:
    2,318
    Thanks Allen,
    I posted my backup method in all seriousness as it is what I do and it has many advantages over others I have seen and used.
    It is a shame when someone butts in and tries to reduce the thread to a Whitehall Farce !!

    Xpilot
     
  7. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2005
    Posts:
    4,751
    Price of a motherboard depends on the features and also the make which implies quality. Price can range from $75-$250 for typical PCs. You can get a very good motherboard in for $100-150.

    Problem is that usually when motherboard dies after several years of service, the CPU is obsolete, too slow and probably won't work in a new MB. To get optimum performance you should get better memory and also the old memory may not be supported. You can see where this is leading and you may be better off to just buy a whole new box.

    My preferred way is to buy a bare box which is usually case, PS, Memory, CPU and MB. I will then swap in my HDs, optical drives, and maybe graphics card. I am not a "shoot-em up" gamer so I don't get up-tight by not having a high-end graphics card.
     
  8. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2005
    Posts:
    4,751
    I have a friend who runs his PC with caddies to the extent he has a HD (all bootable with XP) for photo editing, a HD for games, etc. I think your solution is very good and the price of good caddies is quite reasonable now. Just like having a USB external drive but with better performance and far superior for doing testing.
     
  9. Allen L.

    Allen L. Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2004
    Posts:
    335
    Location:
    -Close-
    Re-read the post...I wasn't *not* poking fun at your post, it made good sense! The other post about the motherboard was what ticked me...it was overdone as to caution - and what *could* happen, and *that* was what I was satirizing. Do as *you* wish in *your* backups, they make good sense to me...I enjoy reading your posts.

    Allen
     
  10. starsfan09

    starsfan09 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2006
    Posts:
    352
    I like your way of Backing-up your system Xpilot, but if your Motherboard actually did go out, and you replaced it with another one that was slightly different...then your Backups are usless. I've read about this, and it's strongly recommended to Reinstall Windows XP once you replace a Motherboard.
    However, If you had the same exact Motherboard, it may be ok. But I wouldn't take the chance. I'd do "Operation Wipe-Out".

    P.S...get a APC Battery Backup to protect your system from Surges, Power Spikes, and Brownouts.
     
  11. far182

    far182 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2006
    Posts:
    14
    I find it funny that we are talking about motherboard replacement on a DISK IMAGING forum. Anyway, all of the above for motherboard is the difficult way of protecting your montherboard etc. Just buy a manufactures warrenty that includes next day delivery of parts. Make sure you get the kind the gaurantees the same type of motherboards etc. Problem solved.
     
  12. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2005
    Posts:
    4,751

    I wouldn't say backups were at all useless particularly if they contained data not available anywhere else such as photos etc. Just how useful they are depends on what they contain! I personally would do clean install of XP if I bought a new MB anyway. Unless you are running a business using your PC, time spent reloading stuff you have the CDs for is nothing but a minor annoyance.

    Most of us do backups because of the risk of HD failure, corruption of the system due to memory failure or bad virus. Motherboards do fail but they are far less frequent than HD failures.
     
  13. DeLorean

    DeLorean Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Posts:
    14
    You can always use Acronis True Image Workstation with the add-on "Universal Restore".
    Then your backups work in 95% on al pc's.


    Greetz
    DeLorean
     
  14. Skyhawk

    Skyhawk Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2004
    Posts:
    102
    Ditto!!!

    True Image's purpose is to back up in the event of a "Hard Drive" failure. It is NOT a magic bullet that backs up for every concieveable failure. Discussion of "What if your motherboard goes down" in this forum is ridiculous period!

    And XPilot, thanks for sharing your findings!

    Skyhawk.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.