Amazon has finally admitted to investors that it has a counterfeit problem

Discussion in 'hardware' started by ronjor, Feb 5, 2019.

  1. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    By Marc Bain 5 Feb 2019
     
  2. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Yes, it's sad. I buy lots less from Amazon than I used to. Their policy about commingled binning for items with a given SKU, regardless of the source, is insane. All counterfeits with packaging that passes the smell test get commingled. So it doesn't matter what seller you buy from. You're just as likely to get counterfeits from actual manufacturers as from counterfeiters. That is, unless the manufacturer jumps through hoops, and pays a bigger cut to Amazon, to get dedicated binning.

    I do get that this isn't Amazon's unique problem. Perhaps more frightening, it's how pharmaceuticals are handled in the US. A manufacturer sells some drug, identified by an NDA number. That's basically a SKU, and it specifies the drug, dosage form, strength, package size, etc. Some hospitals and pharmacies buy directly from manufacturers. Some buy via wholesalers. And there can be multiple layers of wholesalers. So there's opportunity to introduce counterfeits. And stuff gets commingled in the process, according to NDA.

    And it can get stranger. Say a pharmacy goes out of business, or has a fire. Any "undamaged" pharmaceuticals get sold on "grey markets". Or sometimes jerks introduce counterfeits. Or repackage stuff in counterfeited packaging, posing as a higher dose. And eventually all this stuff ends up in hospitals and pharmacies, who have no clue about provenance. If it's the right NDA, and not expired, and looks OK enough, it gets dispensed.

    It's a hard problem. The pharmaceutical industry has been introducing RFID tracking. And probably now blockchain signing, or whatever. That's probably the only viable option for everything. Every object has an identity, which you can verify back to the manufacturer.
     
  3. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    Amazon caught selling counterfeits of publisher’s computer books—again
     
  4. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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