Acronis Update Question

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by The Sand, Aug 19, 2007.

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  1. The Sand

    The Sand Registered Member

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    I was reading in the beginners guide... basically found out what I should have done and didn't.

    I didn't uninstall my TI 10, I updated it. I also didn't image the entire disk, I just did my C drive.

    I guess "updating" your Acronis program unlike, say iTunes, is not a good ideao_O

    As for imaging the ENTIRE disk... I didn't think I needed too - sounds like I'm wrong.

    Just trying t do the right thing...

    Sandy
     
  2. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    There are not any "right" or "wrong" answers to your questions.

    You're not supposed to have to uninstall the previous build before installing the update. It's just that sometimes it causes problems so most users recommend that the TI be uninstalled before installing the newer build. Note that this also does not always work properly and the Acronis folders and Registry entries also have to be removed before the install will work properly. If your TI install is working properly then don't worry about it.

    If you backup your entire drive then you have an entire disk image. This is not mandatory. When you backup single (or multiple) partitions, TI saves a copy of the MBR and Track 0 with it just in case you need it later. If you are restoring the partition image back to it's original place (as in most normal restores) then it should not be a problem.

    If you have another partition on the drive (a data partition, for example) that includes many large files, you may not want to include it in the backup as it will greatly increase the size and time involved in creating the image. Also, these files may be better burned to to DVDs or copied directly to the USB hard drive to keep backups.
     
  3. The Sand

    The Sand Registered Member

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    Hi MudCrab... thanks for answering.

    If users think it's better to uninstall than maybe for the next build I will do that (if this program is anything like iTunes then the next build should be any day now...)

    If there is a problem - like you mentioned with an uninstall how do I remove "Acronis folders and Registry entries." How come "add/remove" programs doesn't take care of all that. I'm not sure I want to look at my "registry." I've heard of the "Horrors" of going there... thus I have never looked at mine... I have CCleaner and never used the registry part as the people on Vista Forum say your a total idiot if you do ANYTHING to your registry.

    The reason I didn't do an entire "disk" image which would include the C and D drives is because of what I was told recently by my OEM. I'll bounce this off you because everybody I know who uses a computer is interested in TMZ.com - where as I am interested in why there is an "error message" when viewing TMZ.com... I'm fascinated by "error messages." Thus nobody to bounce things off of.... My D drive has only my HP recovery on it. I had Norton backup files there and there wasn't enough space. I was unable to access that drive to remove the files so I had to contact HP... and am STILL unable to access that drive. They had to send me some "tool" to clean off the drive - they won't allow you access to it. Basically they told me to NEVER touch or do ANYTHING to that drive. So, when making the decision on what to image I decidd to leave that thing alone... good decision or bad - don't know..

    Thanks for your time and help in this forum...

    Take care,
    Sandy
     
  4. The Sand

    The Sand Registered Member

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    I was answering MudCrab but if anybody has any input I'm always happy to hear it...

    Sandy
     
  5. random110

    random110 Registered Member

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    You should not be concerned with taking an image of both C and D. Acronis will not affect any of the HP recovery files on the D partition. It will simply make a copy.

    If your hard drive fails, you will loose both C and D partitions, so its a good idea to have them both backed up.
     
  6. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    In addition to the previous replies and I believe all the replies are in basic agreement:

    Should you have a disk failure or virus or simply want to upgrade or replace your drive, you get best results with the least problems if you have a full disk backup which includes all partitions. From that full disk backup, you can also restore any of your partitions individually--should there be a need.

    Once you have this full backup in storage, then you can additionally create archives of individual partitions and restore the individual partitions; ....but limited backups of this type is not usually used when upgrading/replacing a system disk.

    This is not an either/or situation. This is a combination of both. Do your full on some type of scheduled basis (weekly or monthly or quarterly) and then work in your backups for individual partitions. Then restart the cycle again in whatever time frame is appropriate for you. It's a matter of personal preference but occasionally include a full backup in your procedures. Having a full disk backup just provides more options--should you have problems. Your procedures depends a lot on how your data is structured within your drives.

    Imaging software is not used all the time in all situations. Many of us use additional means of having copies of our important files using other program--or simple data copy. Keep your archives in multiple places so if one source is not available, you have other choices. Again, it comes down to a matter of what fits best for you.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2007
  7. The Sand

    The Sand Registered Member

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    Thanks so much for your replies here... I feel I have a much better grasp of how to go about this now...

    Thanks for taking the time to explain it...

    Sandy
     
  8. The Sand

    The Sand Registered Member

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    What does it really mean if your "hard drive fails" or your "disk fails." I've had my computer crash - get corrupted... where having Acronis certainly would have been helpful. As I mentioned on another post I have had my hard drive physically break and stop "spinning" where I don't believe "Acronis" or any other program would have helped - that was "hard drive failure" and I needed to buy another computer. What type of thing could take out your ENTIRE disk o_O I always thought the "recovery" from the OEM was in some "protected" area that stayed "safe."

    Of course after reading the posts here I will indeed do a full disk backup just to be ready... but was curious about the meaning of "disk failure."

    Sandy
     
  9. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    Disk failure is excatly that. The mechanics break down or the electronics fail. The drive stops working. It may not power up or it may just make clicking sounds, etc. The bottom line is that you can't use it anymore.

    In that case, if you don't want or need a new computer, you replace the failed hard drive with a new one and restore your backup image. The new drive then contains everything on the old drive and if all goes correctly you can boot up and have a working computer again.

    Crashes can refer to hardware failures or software failures.

    Corruption generally refers to bad writes, mixed up file tables/indexes caused by software problems, bugs, computer shut off while running, etc.
     
  10. The Sand

    The Sand Registered Member

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    I have NO WORDS that you can replace a failed hard drive. I was told by a "professional" that I had to buy another computer... and he left with mine! He probably knew this and ripped me off! I've replaced my ram - but didn't know you could replace the hard drive. That was the only time I have ever had someone come to my house and "fix" something... what a bummer. Thanks for the information...

    Sandy (I'm still reeling right now)
     
  11. The Sand

    The Sand Registered Member

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    Thanks MudCrab for the "definition" for certain terms - I forgot to metion that in the previous post because I'm still so PISSED at obviously being ripped off!

    Sandy
     
  12. The Sand

    The Sand Registered Member

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    Tell me what you think of the following... tell me if it's stupid and I'm not thinking about it right.

    I didn't do the entire disk (which is the C drive (with everything) and the D drive (with the OEM recovery stuff.) I just did a full image of the C drive. If I do an entire disk I will have both the C and D. Now either I just keep rolling like that, with the C and D together (because I HATE differential/incre, etc. don't care) back ups... I only do FULL ones - and that includes my other programs that do it too.) It should not take that much longer really since there isn't much on the d drive. Or I could do it seperately. Do one full image of the C drive (which I have) and one full image of the D drive. Then I wouldn't have to do the D drive again because it doesn't change... I would continue to weekly do a full image of the C drive because it does change. Which is bettero_O If you are someone who doesn't like "differ, incre" backups.

    Thanks,
    Sandy
     
  13. random110

    random110 Registered Member

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    I think your suggestion will work well. Since D is simply a recovery partition it will not change. So, perhaps it is going to be quicker for you to make an image of D (I would also burn a copy so that i had two copies) and then do full backups of C drive as often as you like.

    I would also recommend, as others have, keeping at least 2 backup images of C. You never know until you try whether it will work.
     
  14. The Sand

    The Sand Registered Member

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    After checking out some posts here that is indeed a Good idea! thanks for the info and feedback...

    Sandy :)
     
  15. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

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    But you do need to restore at least one of those images to a spare hard drive to know whether the image is good or not. And it will also confirm whether your procedure for making the Images is in order.
     
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