Acronis True Image Home 2009 : I-node corrupted (0x70012)&#10

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by Paulm2008, Nov 29, 2008.

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  1. Paulm2008

    Paulm2008 Registered Member

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    Location:
    Somerset [UK]
    Good Evening, Having just installed my copy of ATIHome2009. I thought I would undertake the task for which I originally purchased the product for, namely backing up my entire system.

    In the past 3 weeks I have to re-install Vista 64Bit Twice together with ubuntu. It takes about a week to complete what with all the drivers & software updates, virus scanner, firewall, applications and data. To prevent this scenario from happening again !! I took the plunge and bought this product - I'm beginning to think I may have wasted my money.

    However when backing up the drive were the O/S is installed. The backup actually failed - I could not beleive it.

    "I-node corrupted (0x70012)&#10"

    I do not know what this means has anyone encountered this issue ?

    Regards, Paul

    PS : Is The Acronis Knowledge Base really as bad as it seems : a waste of web space ?
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2008
  2. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Location:
    State College, Pennsylvania
    Paul:

    Linux file systems use I-Nodes. So this sounds like a problem with one of your Ubuntu partitions. You should run the file system checker on them to detect/correct errors (similar to running chkdsk on Windows).

    If you have an Ubuntu Live CD, boot your PC from it. Determine which partitions are used by Ubuntu. You can do this from a terminal by entering:
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    Examine the output to determine which partitions belong to Ubuntu and note their device designators ( /dev/sdaX, where "X" is a partition number).

    If the Live CD has automounted the Linux partitions on your hard disk, change the mount setting to read-only. In Kubuntu, you can do this from the control panel; Ubuntu probably has something similar. With the partitions mounted in read-only mode, enter the following command:
    Code:
    sudo fsck /dev/sdaX
    Replace the "X" with the corresponding device designator for each of your Linux partitions (sda2 or sda6, for example). fsck should report on any errors it finds and/or corrects.

    With all of the problems that you've had that required reinstalling operating systems, are you sure that your hard disk does not have any bad sectors? After checking your Linux partitions you should check the Windows partitions. Schedule a disk check by right-clicking on your disk(s) and choosing "Properties". On the "Tools" tab choose "Error Checking". Check off both boxes under "Check disk options", click "Start" and then reboot the PC when requested to allow the disk check to run.

    I would be suspicious of your disk - guilty until proven innocent!
     
  3. Paulm2008

    Paulm2008 Registered Member

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    Location:
    Somerset [UK]
    Thank you very much for the information. The failed disk's were returned to the place of purchase. I hope that there is not another one about to fail. Seems odd, I had an old PIII system with a 40GB HDD - lasted the life of the computer [8 years] with no issues at all. Had this system for 8 months and already have had 2 disk failures. Seems that the new manufactering facilities setup in the new industrialised nations are still bedding in [in terms of processes] - either that or the quality control aspects have gone down the pan.

    It would be interesting to see how failure rates vary as a function of facility location

    Kind Regards - and thank you again for your suggestions
     
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