Acessing backup data

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by BigEduardo, Jul 15, 2006.

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  1. BigEduardo

    BigEduardo Registered Member

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    Hi, new to Acronis True Image Home. Just did my first entire disk backup to my new external drive.

    I tried to access data on that drive, was able to open a folder tree. but when I double clicked a folder that I wanted to open to look a specific files,
    I did not get the "Next" button that would allow me to open it.

    How do I access the individual files on my backup drive, Can I also load new files to that backup instead of putting them on my "C" drvie?

    Thanks in advance..........

    Ed G
    egavin_874@comcast.net
     
  2. dld

    dld Registered Member

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    I presume you're trying to Mount an image. When you say you were able to open a folder tree, are you referring to the following folder tree:

    http://img110.imageshack.us/img110/9739/screenshot010jl1.jpg

    My external drive is labeled S. Are you saying that when you click on your external drive, it will not open to show you your backup image?
     
  3. BigEduardo

    BigEduardo Registered Member

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    When I saw your response I realized I did use "Mount an Image"....I did that and my files became visible so that I could use it as a logical disk. Then when I tried to open it, I got an error message:

    Big Red Button with and "X" , it read, "Selected file is not an Acronis True Image Archive or is corrupted. Please select another backup Archive."

    I only have one backup archive it's my first and only archiveo_O
     
  4. crofttk

    crofttk Registered Member

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    Welcome to Wilders, BigEduardo,

    Please state which build of ATI 9 are you using ?
     
  5. Howard Kaikow

    Howard Kaikow Registered Member

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    Did you do something like the following?

    1. Ask TI to mount an image.
    2. Select the tib file from which to extract the image.
    3. Select the volumes to be extracted and their assigned drive letters.

    If you got that far, then you should be able to access the files in the mounted images.

    Run any of the following programs to determine whether the files are readable.

    http://www.standards.com/index.html?ReadFile
    http://www.standards.com./index.html?GetFileTypeDistribution
    http://www.standards.com./index.html?CompareDrives
     
  6. BigEduardo

    BigEduardo Registered Member

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    Looks like I've got it thanks to all your inputs.

    I am using ATI 9.0 (build 3,633)

    I did use Mount Image wizard

    Selected the .tib file (the only one on my external drive)

    Followed the steps in the wizard, selected read/write capability,and it created a logical drive "N" on "My PC" folder listing.

    I opened a file and was able to see/use the data in the file ........

    *********
    I'm assuming that I can edit/update files in the new logical drive "N" or that when saving work, if I wanted to I could save directly to this drive rather than to my working "C" drive, we'll see, thanks again for the
    help

    egavin_874@comcast.net
     
  7. dld

    dld Registered Member

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    You can edit/update files in the new logical drive if you chose to mount the virtual image in Read/Write mode. This is the relevant portion of the manual on the subject. You'll have to experiment and see just what you can and can't do.

    9. Select whether you want to mount image in Read-only or Read/Write mode.
    10. Click Next.
    11. If you select Read/Write mode, the program assumes that the connected image will be modified, and creates an incremental archive file to capture the changes. It is strongly recommended that you list the forthcoming changes in the comment to this file.
    12. The program displays a summary containing a single operation. Click Proceed to connect the selected partition image as a virtual disk.
    13. After the image is connected, the program will run Windows Explorer, showing its contents. Now you can operate with files or folders as if they were located on a real disk.
    You can connect multiple partition images. If you want to connect another partition image, repeat the procedure. 56 Copyright © Acronis, Inc., 2000-2006
     
  8. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    You could, but don't. The image is a picture of your drive at the time you made it. Trying to edit the image adds addtional files to that image. If you separate them, you lose the changes.

    Do all your work on your normal drives. When you want to backup your work, make a new backup image. You can always delete older images when they are no longer useful.

    However, keep some old backups! You never know when you might need to retrieve a file that you deleted or modified. If you back up weekly, keep the last three or four weeks, then keep one that it two months old and another that is three months old and one that is six months old and one that is a year old, etc. The availability of "aged" backups has been a salvation for many people, so it's a standard part of good backup procedure.
     
  9. bVolk

    bVolk Registered Member

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    BigEduardo,

    You should also be aware that shutting down the computer unmounts the virtual disk even if you didn't unmount it explicitly yourself. So you would have to repeatedly mount it again and again to use it as regularily as you would like to. Not to mention the long (and vulnerable) chain of incrementals that such an approach would create.
     
  10. dld

    dld Registered Member

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    I'm in complete agreement with you John. It is something I should have added to my post. Personally I can't imagine a situation where I would want to edit an image. Why not simply create a new image!
     
  11. Howard Kaikow

    Howard Kaikow Registered Member

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    Yes, drive letters create dby backup programs are not persistent.
    There are two main reasons for wanting such drives to be read/write:

    1. You want to do some testing with the environment provided by the drive, but do not need to save the change.

    2. Perhaps, most importantly, you have discovered that there is malware in the archive and you have a fix to apply. In this case, you wanna save the changes.
     
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