About x64 versions

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by s23, Feb 26, 2010.

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  1. s23

    s23 Registered Member

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    Hi Guys. Just a a quick question:

    In a x64 version all the softwares that already come in the distro and the ones in the repositories is x64 ? or Linux use something like Windows use (wow64) to run x86 apps in x64 enviroment?

    I'm asking because you only have a performance gain if you run a native x64 app not is?

    The x64 version is more secure too (Like in windows?) What is the pros of the x64 version (without count the possibilty of use more RAM)?

    THX
     
  2. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    There is way more x64 programs in Linux than say in Windows currently, only few non free closed source programs like Google Earth, Picasa, Skype remian x32 and thats tackled with ia32 libs. Flash which till last year was x32 and bane of all Linux isues is not thankfully x64 and even though its in alpha stage, it blows the doors of its x32 counterpart in terms of performance.

    x64 programs run in native DEP mode if your CPU supports it, apart from better and higher memory handling, they are also programmed to cue better with x64 multi core CPUs prevelent in today's machine. In tests done at Phoronix, the x64 programs always do better than their x32 ones and sometimes by a big margin as well.
     
  3. chronomatic

    chronomatic Registered Member

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    The distro knows what system your machine runs and upgrades/installs packages accordingly. And, yes, you can run 32 bit binaries on a 64 bit OS -- it's called dual libraries. However, just about everything I can think of is native 64 bit.

    No, 64 bit has nothing to do with security. 64 on Windows is only more secure because M$ uses Patchguard and driver signing on their 64 bit OS's and does not do this on 32 bit (for whatever reason).

    EDIT: the guy above is right -- 64 bit gives you the advantage of being able to utilize the NX bit on your CPU. Of course, the program in question needs to be compiled to support this (and this will vary distro to distro). Ubuntu is pretty good about compiling programs with these hardening features (ESP/ASLR/RELRO, etc.).

    P.S. DEP is a Microsoft term. The correct acronym is ESP (executable space protection).
     
  4. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    Also remember, if you do heavy mutimedia presentations with Open Office presentation, the x32 version has a limit of 2GB which is not present in the x64 version, so presentation and excel data charts are not limited by size anymore.
     
  5. s23

    s23 Registered Member

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    Wow is pros enough for me.
    Thx very much for the detailed replys.
    Will switch today.

    One more question: In the Mint home page they say the x64 version is not stable as the x86... anyone using it encountered problems?

    I'm thinkin in dual boot: what you guys recommend based in what distro offer the best "compiling programs with these hardening features (ESP/ASLR/RELRO, etc.)."

    Ubuntu/Mint, Opensuse or sabayon?

    Thx very much.
     
  6. wat0114

    wat0114 Guest

    On my dual core AMD x64, none to speak of.
     
  7. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    Ignore that silly line about stability, dunno why they have it there in the first place.
     
  8. s23

    s23 Registered Member

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    OK.
    Finished the download a few minutes ago. Will install now.
    THX again for the quick/detailed replys.

    Take care
     
  9. Kerodo

    Kerodo Registered Member

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    No problems here either, with both the KDE x64 and Gnome x64 versions on 2 machines.
     
  10. s23

    s23 Registered Member

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    Hi guys again:

    Any of you guys experimented a strange behaviour with latest opensuse gnome x64?
    In the live CD after confirm the Live session and after the "Loading Kernel" window the computer freeze - no signal in the dvd drive, HD, and the caps lock and scroll lock lights in the keyboard in ON. Nothing happens. I cannot even check the CD for errors (same thing occur after the "Loading Kernel window).
    To make it work I need press F4 and switch Kernel to safe settings.
    After this i sucessfull booted it and installed.
    BUT after install the same thing occur at the first boot. In a first moment i see in the Opensuse forums about problem with the ATI drives and a black screen issue then I tried boot with VGA=3... The boot begin... and alot of errors regarding ACPI appear.
    Adding acpi=off the system booted ok. But now i always need do this to boot it.... or the computer freeze.

    What is going on? The problem looks like is with ACPI, but anyone can explain me in a more detailed way? Why this not occur with the x86 version?
    I need disable ACPI in the BIOS?

    THX


    Note: Mint x64 worked great. I just need change one thing or two in the Firefox apparmor profile because it not run flash player with it on.
     
  11. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    Do you have ATI graphics?
     
  12. s23

    s23 Registered Member

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    Yes. Onboard. ATI x1200 (GA-MA69VM-S2 motherboard).
     
  13. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    Thats the culprit, ATI, especially certain chipsets have big issues with Linux in general.
     
  14. Kerodo

    Kerodo Registered Member

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    Yes, I can vouch for that. I have had a hell of a time with a few distros with my ATI onboard graphics. To put it bluntly, it sucks..... In those cases where I have problems, I just have to move on to other distros for now.
     
  15. wat0114

    wat0114 Guest

    It'll be nice, hopefully sooner than later, to see Linux improve in the graphics support department. It needs to get better. My nVidia GPUs suffer under so many distros, usually resulting in only basic graphics resolution, and sometimes blank screens or similar. Mint/Ubuntu has given me the best experience by far, with Mepis not too far behind.
     
  16. s23

    s23 Registered Member

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    I see. I read about a lot of problems with ATI. I not know if mine is really ATI, because simply putting acpi=off all work ok... until yesterday... today now opensuse not power off right... i will move on until the 11.3 release... or will try use through a VM.


    To not create another topic: What you guys have to say about Sabayon?
     
  17. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    Sabayon is the best equivalent of eye candy Linux desktop, comes with lots of stuff and is based on super fast Gentoo.
     
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