Partition sizing when cloning

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by Warpspasm, Apr 1, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Warpspasm
    Offline

    Warpspasm Registered Member

    Noob question here.

    If I make a clone of my 120 GB drive which is broken into 3 partitions and install the clone onto a 160 GB drive with no additional partitions set up (just one big one for C), what happens? Does it create 3 partitions on the 160 GB drive? Does the left over 40 GB of space just go into the last partition?
  2. Menorcaman
    Offline

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

    Hi,

    Cloning the 120GB drive in "Automatic" mode will result in the 3 partitions being distributed proportionately over the whole of the 160GB drive. Clone it in "Manual" mode though and you'll be able to set the size of the 3 cloned partitions yourself.

    Regards
  3. Warpspasm
    Offline

    Warpspasm Registered Member

    When I clone this drive, should I mount the new empty 160 GB drive as a slave to the active 120 GB drive, boot the pc and clone to the 160 GB slave. Then, power every thing down and switch the positions of slave and master making the 160 the master?
  4. Menorcaman
    Offline

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

    Yes, that's right. However, when cloning under Windows, TI needs to reboot itself in order to make the clone so don't power down until the process is complete. Also worth reading this <previous post by Acronis Support> regarding the difference between cloning under Windows and cloning from the bootable rescue CD.

    Regards
  5. Warpspasm
    Offline

    Warpspasm Registered Member

    I've been reading some of the other posts and here's something I still don't understand. In order for XP to properly label the partitions, I have to make sure the old drive doesn't see the new drive when creating the clone, otherwise it will assign latter drive letters to the new drive. Once the clone is made, the new drive can't be allowed to see the old drive otherwise same thing will happen. How the heck do you do that? If I'm running on the old drive and tell TI to create a clone, where does it put it? I would guess on the old drive, but I doubt there's enough room on the old drive to hold a clone of itself. Then, how would I put that clone on the new drive if both of them weren't on line at the same time? I'm probably missing something here. If I'm not, I think Acronis needs to write their program to allow both drives to be mounted then have the option to automatically edit the registry to assign drive letters the way you want them.

    One other thing. Do I need to set up the partitions on the new drive before putting the cloned drive there or does that happen automatically when the clone is copied there?
  6. Menorcaman
    Offline

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

    Hi again Warpspasm,

    The following should ensure that Windows XP doesn't get confused:

    1. Power down and fit the 160GB drive as the slave.
    2. Boot from the True Image bootable rescue CD and carry out the clone. Power down when finished and remove both drives.
    3. Jumper the 160GB drive as "Master" and fit it as the primary. Do not refit the old 120GB drive yet.
    4. Boot into Windows from the new primary drive and let it correctly assign a drive letter. When you are happy that everything works as advertised then power down.
    5. If connecting both drives to the same IDE controller then refit the original 120GB drive with the jumper set as "Slave", otherwise leave it as "Master" and connect to the second IDE controller.
    6. Power back up and keep your fingers crossed!!

    No point in setting up the new drive first as any partition info will be overwritten during the clone process. If cloning in "Automatic" mode then the clone will utilize all of the 160GB (distributed proportionately if there was more than 1 partition on the source drive). Elect to clone in "Manual" mode if you want to manipulate the size of the cloned partition(s).

    Regards
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.