NOD 5.0.94.0 hour and forty minutes scanning time??

Discussion in 'ESET NOD32 Antivirus' started by acillatem, Nov 12, 2011.

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  1. rcdailey
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    rcdailey Registered Member

    Right. One thing I did not think of to ask the OP was whether he had checked to see what services were running when he scans. I had a recent experience in which software I was already using was updated and then, all of a sudden, I found my image backup running at half the speed that I was used to seeing. I checked my services and found that the indexing service was started. I could not figure out why, since it was previously disabled. I determined that the updated software had turned on the indexing service. I reconfigured that software and also made sure that the indexing service was disabled again. That immediately restored the backup speed I was used to.
  2. acillatem
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    acillatem Registered Member

    Yeah, I've come to the conclusion that it's not NOD32. It has to be something either with my computer of some software. It is an old computer, and I still can't help wonder if the one ESET customer service person that I talked to wasn't maybe right about my HDD slowing down. He thought it might be an old 5900rpm drive, but it's a 7200 rpm drive. Like I said, I ran the extended test with the Western Digital diagnostics tool, and according to Western Digital, if it passes all the tests, there is nothing wrong with it, and it did. I wonder if maybe it doesn't pick up a HDD that is slowing down?? Maybe I'm just grasping. It is a 2004 Dell.
  3. acillatem
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    acillatem Registered Member

    I haven't done that, but would that be something I'd just check with the task manager? And, what exactly would I be looking for? Nothing has changed other than the upgrade to version 5, but I'm willing to try anything to figure this out. I'm sort of leaning towards it being an older computer, but version 4 wasn't taking this long just a while back.
  4. acillatem
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    acillatem Registered Member

    I was running a scan when I posted my last post, so I checked the task manager, just for the heck of it, not really knowing what to look for. Anyway, thought I'd take a screenshot and post it here.....maybe someone would see something not right. I use FastStone Capture to take screen shots, and it's not exactly a resource hog by any means, and it was funny, the second I clicked on the 'Capture Rectangle Region' in the toll, my scan stopped.....the little icon in my taskbar stopped spinning, as if it can't handle the scan and that screen capture utility being open at the same time. I know it's an old computer, but I do have a GB of RAM, and nothing else is running but the scanner and I opened this utility. That seems like RAM to me, but I ran memtest overnight, with 8 passes, I believe it was, and it didn't show anything. Here's a screenshot of my task manager, if that helps at all.

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  5. SweX
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    SweX Registered Member

    Hi once again acillatem ;)

    FYI. Yes you do have something else running in that screenie, I can see Firefox.exe running and it's using around 125MB of RAM at that moment. Plus plugin-container.exe using another 20MB (it's the Firefox plugin module)

    And yeah, I also don't think that NOD32 is the "troublemaker" in this.
    It must be something else Software/Hardware related, but what.......:doubt:
    (I personally don't think it's HW related.)
  6. acillatem
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    acillatem Registered Member

    Yeah, you're right, but when I've run these scans that have taken an hour and a half or more, nothing else is open at the time, so Firefox wouldn't have an affect on those scans. I'll have to run a scan with nothing else open to see what is showing up in task manager.
  7. rcdailey
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    rcdailey Registered Member

    With XP, you have to look in the control panel under Performance and Maintenance, Administrative Tools, Services (in the classic menu, Administrative Tools can be accessed directly). If you had Win 7, you could see the Services in the Task Manager. That's just one of the improvements, but we who have old computers can see these only on the computers that belong to others.

    Anyway, when you open the Services tab, you can see what services are installed, and which ones are "started." It is the ones that are started that will use resources.


    I find it is better to close the browser and my e-mail app when running a scan with NOD32.
  8. acillatem
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    acillatem Registered Member

    I usually do, and these ridiculously long scan have been with no browser or email open. Thanks for the info on the services!

    I've attached a screenshot of the services, and I took it while the scan was running, for whatever it's worth.

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  9. SweX
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    SweX Registered Member

    I see, that's good :thumb:
  10. rcdailey
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    rcdailey Registered Member

    I don't see anything abnormal, off hand. I did note that you have shell hardware detection enabled and I don't. I had to check on why that was and then I saw the relationship between that and autoplay. If you have autoplay enabled, you need shell hardware detection. I have autoplay disabled on my system. That's not a resource issue, just a security choice. Apart from that, there are obviously some hardware differences such as your having an Nvidia driver and I don't. I do have 2GB of RAM, and more space available on my hard drive (only about 35 percent in use out of 128GB on the boot partition), but you weren't having problems with regard to disk space and memory before.

    There is always the possibility that there is something wrong with components on the motherboard such as capacitors failing, which can affect the stability of power to your drives and memory. I had that problem with the motherboard in my system, so that I had to get a different box with a different motherboard that did not have failing components and swap the memory and hard drive. That fixed some issues that I was experiencing respecting slow operation from time to time and problems with lost clusters. Frankly, unless you know someone who can do such a swap at minimal cost (no more than $100), it's not worth fixing a computer that is 8 years old if there is a motherboard problem.
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