Manually aborted "Redistribute free space wizard" leaves donor partition unformatted

Discussion in 'Paragon Partition Manager Product Line' started by xentas, May 27, 2011.

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  1. xentas
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    xentas Registered Member

    Manually aborted "Redistribute free space wizard" left donor partition as unformatted

    I have (or perhaps - had?!) two partitions - a system one with Windows 7 and another one for nearly everything else.

    I was trying to increase my system partition (with 5GBs) as it was running out of space so i desided to use the "Redistribute Free Space Wizard" of Paragon Partition Manager 11 Personal. Upon start the wizard said it needs to reboot in order to gain exclusive access to my drive. After rebooting it started the procedure which was still not completed after 1 hour has passed. I aborted the operation from the abort command in the interface. Then, Windows booted with the first (system) partition intact while the second has been split into two - one 5GB unallocated space and the rest, what should have been my old partition downsized, is now an inaccesible, unformatted partition! Is all my data gone?! Can i recover the partition?

    Why i decided to abort:
    If my understanding of the cryptic data fields in the status of the running wizard is correct: "Done" and "All" (in GBs) mean respectively how much data has and will be written. In my estimate based on Done/All rate of change, it would have taken >16hrs to complete moving just 5GB of free space from one partition to the other! Seems it was moving the whole second partition? I had to do my own time estimate because the program wouldn't give me a correct one - estimated time left kept rising constantly (instead of the opposite!) despite read/write speeds not changing very much. Since i wasn't planning on such a long procedure and i needed my PC for work i decided to "abort" the operation thinking if it was a destructive abort the program would warn me. Instead, it simply asked if i'm sure i want to abort the operation without any notice of what the consequences might be.
    Last edited: May 27, 2011
  2. xentas
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    xentas Registered Member

    Please, anyone? What can i do to recover my data :(
    These were NTFS filesystems. Is the MFT table of the unformatted partition alive somewhere and the filesystem recoverable or is raw recovery of the files (with sth like GetDataBack) the only option?
    Sorry if i'm not very clear, i'm not an expert.
  3. SIW2
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    SIW2 Registered Member

    Did you try the Paragon partition undelete function?
  4. xentas
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    xentas Registered Member

    the donor partition that is lost has been splitted into a 5gb unallocated space and a 570gb partition that is unformated. it will only let me choose "undelete partition" on the unallocated space and there it finds nothing...
  5. xentas
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    xentas Registered Member

    omg, problem solved! seems everything is back at least the files that i've checked so far.

    Here's what i did:
    i deleted the unformated partition to combine it with the other unallocated space and then ran the "Undelete Partitions" wizard of Paragon Partition Manager on that whole resulting unallocated space and it found a partition to undelete. At first it looked as if it is the same partition that i just deleted - same size BUT this time it was offseted to the left and the chunk of unallocated space was on the other side. So i did the undelete and voila! Hopefully the unallocated space that is left is from defragmented free space of the original partition and no files are lost. Even if that's not so, it's a small portion.

    Thank you, SIW2 so much for making me consider this undelete function. A life saver :)
  6. SIW2
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    SIW2 Registered Member

    Glad you got it working. :D

    The Paragon partition undelete is very good. It would be better still if you could scan any part of the drive - instead of just unallocated space.
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