Hundreds of thousands may lose Internet in July

Discussion in 'malware problems & news' started by ronjor, Apr 20, 2012.

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  1. Carver
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    Carver Registered Member

    Ditto, I heard the news this morning they said if you have computer problems because of DNS changer to call your ISP.
  2. Page42
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    Page42 Registered Member

    DNSChanger: By the Numbers
  3. Mrkvonic
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    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

    There are more important things that preventing people from installing crap on their computers, things like education, healthcare and whatnot. Why would police waste time with trivial things?
    Mrk
  4. Keatah
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    Keatah Registered Member

    The important things like healthcare and education are still not being addressed anyways.. So let's do something else. Let the cesspool of humanity be as it is.
  5. twl845
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    twl845 Registered Member

    Ya know, yesterday was July 9th when some folks were supposed to lose their internet. If you're reading this it wasn't you or me. I don't see a reason not to close this thread. :p
  6. CyberMan969
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    CyberMan969 Registered Member

    Some people can bring whole institutions down with just a few lines of code, spreading misery to millions of users. I'd hardly call that trivial.

    Also imagine if some creep was to bring down the systems of banks that fulfil charitable transactions to third world countries. Aid delivery could be severely affected and people could die as a result.

    Cybercrime is NOT trivial. To thing of it as such is naive.
  7. Mrkvonic
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    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

    How many people died of flu last year?
    How many died of C code?
    See the difference?
    Movies aside, the security thingie is overblown.
    No creep can bring banks down or anything like that.
    Doesn't work in real life. Life is not Die Hard 4 bullcrap.
    Mrk
  8. Mrkvonic
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    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

    Love your priorities. So compassionate.
    Cyber crime is like any other, if less violent.
    So priorities for THE police should be accordingly.
    I'd rather see thieves who rob old people go away than hax0rs who trick people into downloading suprapr0ndownlaoder2013.exe.
    Mrk
  9. CyberMan969
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    CyberMan969 Registered Member

    Apples and oranges my friend. Cybercrime affects millions worldwide, and unlike the flu (which will kill some of the old and the weak anyway), we can do something about it.
  10. CyberMan969
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    CyberMan969 Registered Member

    Nothing to do with compassion. You just hate the fact that someone happens to disagree with your way of thinking. Of course it's best for the scumbags who commit 'normal' crimes to be punished severely, I'm all for that, who wouldn't? You are just stating the obvious. The need to combat one form of crime does not negate the need to combat another as well.
  11. Mrkvonic
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    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

    Hate? A strong word. I just find it funny that people think their little puzzle of hobby and fun - malware drama - is the most important thing in the world, when it is probably the least important in the global scale of things.
    Mrk
  12. CyberMan969
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    CyberMan969 Registered Member

    You talk like you know me but you don't, and you couldn't be further from the truth regarding what I have seen first-hand and with my own eyes about real human misery. But you're also right, hate is a strong word. Lets agree to disagree and leave it at that, OK? :thumb:
  13. Gullible Jones
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    Gullible Jones Guest

    Wow, you're coming off fairly arrogant.

    Got news: Internet access is a privilege. Owning a computer is a privilege. Having the resources to learn how to use a computer... Is a privilege. To be a victim of malware you already have to be insanely privileged.

    It's not comparing apples to oranges. It's comparing a shoplifter to Hitler.
  14. Hungry Man
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    Hungry Man Registered Member

    Actually internet access is a human right according to the UN.
  15. Hungry Man
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    Hungry Man Registered Member

    I'm sure thousands have died and will die due to 'C Code' and banks are easy as **** to hack lol
  16. Gullible Jones
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    Gullible Jones Guest

    Not saying it shouldn't be. The fact remains that in practice it is a privilege, like many human rights in many places.

    Edit: I wonder if the UN considers health care a human right.
  17. CyberMan969
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    CyberMan969 Registered Member

    I never said that it was the same so please DO NOT put words in my mouth. Real life crime is worse, nobody can dispute that, and that fact does not negate the need for cybercrime to be fought as well.

    I have worked as a volunteer for a children's charity both in Africa and South America and have seen poverty and misery with my own eyes that most people only get to see on TV. I have also worked my a** off for years in order to be able to afford my petty 'privileges'. You simply don't have the right to assume things about me. HAVE I JUDGED YOU??

    I think this 'conversation'/debate, whatever you wanna call it, ends here. :mad: :mad: :mad:
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2012
  18. MarcP
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    MarcP Registered Member

    We had rolling blackouts yesterday across our province. Our utility company says that the high temperatures and the shutdown of 4 power plants forced the measure.

    They're not fooling anyone.... ;)
  19. twl845
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    twl845 Registered Member

    Maybe if you live in Communist China it's a privilege. In the USA you can have it all if you have the cash. :cool:
  20. Gullible Jones
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    Gullible Jones Guest

    Umm. See definition of a privilege?

    Edit: to be a bit more clear, the cash it depends on is also a privilege. In theory people can go from rags to riches (and some have), in practice that is hugely dependent on circumstances. Social mobility in the US (and many first-world countries) is pretty limited for most people.
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 10, 2012
  21. Gullible Jones
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    Gullible Jones Guest

    BTW, Cyberman969: I did make assumptions about where you were coming from, and that was stupid of me; I'm sorry for that. I still find myself in disagreement with you, but I thought an apology was due.
  22. CyberMan969
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    CyberMan969 Registered Member

    Thank you Jones, this means a lot to me and I also apologise for shouting in my last post. I think I didn't express correctly what I was trying to convey here. Of course there are much bigger problems in the world that cybercrime, no one can ever dispute that. What I was trying to say is that we also need better defences against cybercriminals. Of course the crimefighting resources have to be divided properly so real-life crime always takes priority.

    I was born into a poor family and we got no breaks from anyone. My dad has been working hard since he was 12 years of age and he is still the most honest man I have ever met. Both me and my brother had to work mega-hard in order to achieve a decent standard of living and be able to take care of our parents. These are the reasons why I hate fraudsters, scamsters etc., greedy, lazy people who take the easy route and exploit others to make a living; and the internet has become the perfect hunting ground for such predators.

    I was actually wrong about my earlier "heavier sentencing for cybercriminals" comment. A lot of those people won't be dissuaded by heavier sentencing alone, because the potential profits far outweigh the potential risks in their heads. We could get better results simply by educating new users and helping them adopt a more proactive attitude towards such dangers.

    Thank you again Jones!
  23. siljaline
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    siljaline Registered Member

    With all the verification tools that were and remain available, it was generally a non-event ...
  24. jackdiaz
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    jackdiaz Registered Member

    it sounds like everyone's pretty right about this topic.
    pharmacological/biological epidemics affect our society as severely as digital/economic epidemics but because they're rooted in different programs, they hurt different sections of our 'global' system. in most cases they intertwine and evolve into a far worse problem than just the flu or a breach, ex. think about the spread of disease in developing countries when they're hit by a fluke (or deliberate) blowout of their currency on the stock exchange.

    i don't know, the trajectory of the world interconnectedness feels like it's raising too fast for anything to be the single largest problem at this point.
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