FriendlyGreetings spam/malware

Discussion in 'NOD32 version 1 Forum' started by marti, Oct 26, 2002.

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  1. marti
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    marti Registered Member

    What is ESET's position on this malware?

    McAfee doesn't consider it a virus, but has added (or will add) it to their definitions: http://vil.nai.com/vil/content/v_99760.htm

    Symantec has a write up, but has not added it to their definitions: http://securityresponse.symantec.com/avcenter/venc/data/friendgreetings.html

    CA/eTrust has a write up, but no definition: http://www3.ca.com/virusinfo/virus.asp?ID=13444
  2. CARCHARODON
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    CARCHARODON Registered Member

    I'll tell you I'm not a big fan of it.. Its just a worm that askes for Permission.... thanks Marti.
  3. marti
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    marti Registered Member

    I have seen warnings about "friendly greetings" posted in Wilders (not sure which forum), DSLR, and PC Q&A.

    My position is that the AV folks should include it in their definitions, as it does send an email to everyone in your address book (Microsoft programs only).
  4. LowWaterMark
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    LowWaterMark Administrator

    Yes, that is pretty bad. They can say, well, "People need to read the EULA", but I think people just look for the fastest way to get those off their screens.

    Here's the related link on Wilders:

    http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=4429;start=0;boardseen=1
  5. marti
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    marti Registered Member

    Good old "social engineering" at work. Real viruses use it, and use it effectively.
  6. rodzilla
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    rodzilla Registered Member

    My own gut feeling is that it should be included ... after all, it is a worm ... just a worm which asks for your permission to do its worming.

    I don't like what it does, and in my opinion the EULA doesn't warn strongly enough that you'll spam everyone you know if you agree to it ... but a judge may consider it to be a legitimate program, in which case there would be legal ramifications if antivirus software detected and blocked it as a virus.

    The other side of the coin of course is that if this spamware is legally declared kosher by a judge than virus coders could conceivably use that precedent to "legalize" the spreading of their own little nasties simply by tagging on ambiguous EULAs.

    Maybe a new virus category ... "Legal Worm" ... is needed. :)
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